Saudi Arabia’s Amkest Group signs deal with US green energy firm

Saudi Arabia’s Amkest Group signs deal with US green energy firm
Amr Khashoggi, Chairman of Amkest Group and Scott Poulter, Chief Executive of Pacific Green Technologies
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Updated 05 December 2020

Saudi Arabia’s Amkest Group signs deal with US green energy firm

Saudi Arabia’s Amkest Group signs deal with US green energy firm
  • Its expansion into Saudi Arabia through this joint venture is no surprise since the Kingdom is aiming for 30 percent of its energy to come from renewable sources by 2030

RIYADH: US-based Pacific Green Technologies Inc. (PGTK) has signed a joint venture agreement with Amr Khashoggi Trading Co. Ltd. (Amkest Group) to incorporate a company in Saudi Arabia for the sale of Pacific Green environmental technologies.
Amkest Group, founded in 1983, has a history of success in the Kingdom. Its diverse business portfolio includes construction material production and supply, property development and consulting services.
Commenting on the partnership, Scott Poulter, PGTK’s CEO, said: “Saudi Arabia under its Vision 2030 strategic framework, which calls for 9.5 GW of the Kingdom’s energy to be supplied through renewables by 2030, is set to undergo rapid growth.”
Poulter added: “Pacific Green’s technologies, particularly in the solar power, desalination and battery energy storage system sectors, provide the perfect solution to the Kingdom’s growing demand, and we are excited to leverage Amkest Group’s hard-earned relationships to contribute toward the goals of Vision 2030.”
Amr Khashoggi, chairman of Amkest Group, said: “We believe the combination of our experience and knowledge of the Saudi market, coupled with Pacific Green’s portfolio of technologies, provides the foundation for an incredible partnership and the opportunity to offer multiple complementary technologies.”
Pacific Green is focused on addressing the world’s need for cleaner and more sustainable energy. Its expansion into Saudi Arabia through this joint venture is no surprise since the Kingdom is aiming for 30 percent of its energy to come from renewable sources by 2030.
The deal comes on the back of an expectation that Saudi Arabia will attract more than $20 billion in investments in renewables over the next decade. This forecast was made by the CEO of Saudi National Grid in October, according to a report by S&P Global.


France wants end to US-Europe trade spat

France wants end to US-Europe trade spat
Updated 17 January 2021

France wants end to US-Europe trade spat

France wants end to US-Europe trade spat
  • All eyes on President-elect Biden to resolve disputes between partners

PARIS: The EU and the incoming administration of US President-elect Joe Biden should suspend a trade dispute to give themselves time to find common ground, France’s foreign minister said in remarks published on Sunday.

“The issue that’s poisoning everyone is that of the price escalation and taxes on steel, digital technology and Airbus,” Jean-Yves Le Drian told Le Journal du Dimanche in an interview.

He said he hoped the sides could find a way to settle the dispute. “It may take time, but in the meantime, we can always order a moratorium,” he added.

At the end of December the US moved to boost tariffs on French and German aircraft parts in the Boeing-Airbus subsidy dispute, but the bloc decided to hold off on retaliation for now.

The EU is planning to present a World Trade Organization (WTO) reform proposal in February and is willing to consider reforms to restrain the judicial authority of the WTO’s dispute-settlement body.

The US has for years complained that the WTO Appellate Body makes unjustified new trade rules in its decisions and has blocked the appointment of new judges to stop this, rendering the body inoperable.

The Trump administration, which leaves office on Wednesday, had threatened to impose tariffs on French cosmetics, handbags and other goods in retaliation for France’s digital services tax, which it said discriminated against US tech firms.

Overturning decades of free trade consensus was a central part of Trump’s “America First” agenda. In 2018, declaring that “trade wars are good, and easy to win,” he shocked allies by imposing tariffs on imported steel and aluminum from most of the world.

While Trump later dropped tariffs against Australia, Japan, Brazil and South Korea in return for concessions, he kept them in place against more than $7 billion worth of EU metal. The bloc retaliated with tariffs on more than $3 billion worth of US goods, from orange juice and blue jeans to Harley Davidson bikes, and took its case to the WTO.

While Biden promises to be more predictable than Trump, he is not expected to lift the steel tariffs immediately. Even if he wants to, he could run into reluctance from producers in “rust belt” states such as Michigan and Pennsylvania that secured his election win.

Hosuk Lee-Makiyama, director of trade think tank ECIPE, said the US was unlikely to award Europe a “free pass,” noting that countries that had offered concessions to have their tariffs lifted could complain if Europe won better treatment.

Resolving future trade disputes could become easier, if Biden reverses Trump policy that paralyzed the WTO by blocking the appointment of judges to its appellate body.