Armenians, Azerbaijan trade blame over breach of Nagorno-Karabakh peace deal

Separatist officials in Nagorno-Karabakh said the Azerbaijani military launched an attack late Friday that left three local ethnic Armenian servicemen wounded. (AFP/File Photo)
Separatist officials in Nagorno-Karabakh said the Azerbaijani military launched an attack late Friday that left three local ethnic Armenian servicemen wounded. (AFP/File Photo)
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Updated 12 December 2020

Armenians, Azerbaijan trade blame over breach of Nagorno-Karabakh peace deal

Separatist officials in Nagorno-Karabakh said the Azerbaijani military launched an attack late Friday that left three local ethnic Armenian servicemen wounded. (AFP/File Photo)
  • The new clashes mark the first significant breach of the peace deal brokered by Russia on Nov. 10
  • Deal was major shock for Armenians, triggering protests calling for resignation of PM

YEREVAN: Armenian officials and Azerbaijan on Saturday accused each other of breaching a peace deal that ended six weeks of fierce fighting over Nagorno-Karabakh, and Azerbaijan’s leader threatened to crush Armenian forces with an “iron fist.”
The new clashes mark the first significant breach of the peace deal brokered by Russia on Nov. 10 that saw Azerbaijan reclaim control over broad swathes of Nagorno-Karabakh and surrounding lands which were held by Armenian forces for more than a quarter-century.
Separatist officials in Nagorno-Karabakh said the Azerbaijani military launched an attack late Friday that left three local ethnic Armenian servicemen wounded.
Russian peacekeepers deployed to the region to monitor the peace deal reported a violation of the cease-fire in the Gadrut region on Friday. The report issued Saturday by the Russian Defense Ministry didn’t assign blame.
Later in the day, the Armenian Defense Ministry also charged that the Azerbaijani army mounted an attack in the south of Nagorno-Karabakh on Saturday.
Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev reacted on Saturday by blaming Armenia for the new clashes and threatened to “break its head with an iron fist.”
“Armenia shouldn’t try to start it all over again,” Aliyev said during a meeting with top diplomats from the United States and France who have tried to mediate the decades-old conflict.” It must be very cautious and not plan any military action. This time, we will fully destroy them. It mustn’t be a secret to anyone.”
Azerbaijan’s Defense Ministry said in a statement late Saturday that its forces thwarted Armenian “provocations” and restored the cease-fire.
Armenian officials said the fighting raged near the villages of Hin Tager and Khtsaberd, the only settlements in the Gadrut region that are still controlled by Armenian forces. They noted that the two villages have been fully encircled by the Azerbaijani army, which controls the only road leading to them.
Nagorno-Karabakh lies within Azerbaijan but was under the control of ethnic Armenian forces backed by Armenia since a separatist war there ended in 1994. That war left Nagorno-Karabakh itself and substantial surrounding territory in Armenian hands.
In 44 days of fighting that began in late September and left more than 5,600 people killed on both sides, the Azerbaijani army pushed deep into Nagorno-Karabakh, forcing Armenia to accept last month’s peace deal that saw Azerbaijan reclaim much of the separatist region along with surrounding areas. Russia deployed nearly 2,000 peacekeepers for at least five years to monitor the peace deal and to facilitate the return of refugees.
Azerbaijan marked its victory with a military parade on Thursday that was attended by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and involved more than 3,000 troops, dozens of military vehicles, and a flyby of combat aircraft.
The peace deal was a major shock for Armenians, triggering protests calling for the resignation of Prime Minister Nikola Pashinyan, who has refused to step down. He described the peace agreement as a bitter but necessary move that prevented Azerbaijan from taking over all of Nagorno-Karabakh.


Young Pakistani inventor invents ‘smart shoes’ to help blind people

Young Pakistani inventor invents ‘smart shoes’ to help blind people
Updated 3 min 14 sec ago

Young Pakistani inventor invents ‘smart shoes’ to help blind people

Young Pakistani inventor invents ‘smart shoes’ to help blind people
  • Wasiullah, 17, says he entered world of innovation by repairing and fixing damaged battery-operated toys

PESHAWAR: A young inventor from Pakistan’s northwest has designed “smart shoes” for visually impaired people that warn them with a sound or vibration about any obstacle on their path within a radius of 120 cm.
Hailing from the Swat Valley in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Wasiullah, the 17-year-old inventor, told Arab News he had entered the world of innovation by repairing and fixing damaged battery-operated toys.
“Visually impaired people will no longer need walking sticks or guides after smart shoes acquire popularity,” Wasiullah, who goes by a single name, said. “The shoes are fixed with an ultrasonic sensor and Arduino board to keep blind people safe while they are walking. Such individuals can get a prior notification of any looming hindrance.”
Local physics teacher Muhammad Farooq said Wasiullah was his most brilliant student and that he had planned to design a new type of a wheelchair to help visually impaired people navigate their surroundings, but that he could not do it due to financial constraints.
Budget restrictions did not stifle his inventiveness, though, and when he designed the shoes earlier this year, it was reward for his perseverance.
“I still believe he has the potential to emerge as a leading scientist if he gets proper coaching and opportunity,” Farooq said.
One such opportunity, which would also help Wasiullah afford higher education in the field of science, could be introducing his invention to the market.
“Smart shoes for visually impaired people are available in foreign countries,” Farooq said. “But their prices are beyond the reach for many in this country. The government should own the project because the shoes Wasiullah has made are comparatively cheaper.”
Mian Sayed, a social activist from Swat, has seen Wasiullah’s smart shoes and is positive that they could even become an export product.
“I knew Wasiullah, who is one of the brilliant students (who) can bring laurels for the country,” Sayed added. “The shoes invented by him can even be exported if the project is owned by the government.”
Wasiullah said a pair of his smart shoes could cost about 4,500 rupees ($26), but he would not be able to finance production himself as he also needs to finance his college studies.
An opportunity may come from the local government.
Sajid Shah, head of the provincial directorate general of science, told Arab News the shoes will soon be evaluated by experts.
“After evaluation by our scientists,” he said, “our department will promote the project of smart shoes invented by Wasiullah for commercial purposes.”

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Philippines seeks to complete restoration of Marawi before end of Duterte’s term

Philippines seeks to complete restoration of Marawi before end of Duterte’s term
Updated 21 sec ago

Philippines seeks to complete restoration of Marawi before end of Duterte’s term

Philippines seeks to complete restoration of Marawi before end of Duterte’s term
  • Duterte inaugurated the reconstructed Grand Mosque of Marawi

MANILA: Four years after pro-Daesh militants captured Marawi, leading to months of fighting with the Philippine Army that reduced the city to ruins, the chief reconstruction official said on Monday the restoration process should be completed by the end of President Rodrigo Duterte’s term in June.
The siege of the lakeside town on the island of Mindanao began on May 23, 2017, and lasted five months, leaving more than 1,100 people dead. It was the military’s toughest and longest conflict since the Second World War.
Marawi suffered widespread damage during the fighting, which forced more than 100,000 residents from their homes in the predominantly Muslim city, according to International Committee of the Red Cross estimates.
“The Task Force Bangon Marawi, along with its 56 implementing agencies, remains on track in completing all infrastructure projects included in the master development plan within the term of President Rodrigo Duterte,” Maj. Gen. (Retd.) Eduardo Del Rosario, head of Task Force Bangon Marawi, an inter-agency task force in charge of reconstruction, told Arab News.
“Rehabilitation of public infrastructures in the city is now 75 to 80 percent complete,” he added.
As Marawi marked the fourth anniversary of its liberation from the Daesh-affiliate militant Maute group on Saturday, Duterte inaugurated the reconstructed Grand Mosque of Marawi.
“This place holds historical and cultural significance in the lives of the Maranaos, who will rejoice as a nation as the Grand Mosque of Marawi brings hope to our Muslim brothers and sisters,” the president said, as the mosque reopened for public use.
So far five of the city’s 30 mosques have been rebuilt, according to Del Rosario, who said the reopening of the Grand Mosque was a symbol of the Duterte administration’s “full commitment to rehabilitate Marawi.”
During the mosque’s reopening, Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao MP Zia Alonto Adiong said the end of the 2017 conflict in Marawi had “left behind so much death and destruction,” but added its residents had been determined to “rise from the ashes of war” and rebuild their communities.
“I am hopeful that in our lifetime, we will see the rise of a better Marawi, a Marawi City with stronger and more resilient communities as its core foundation,” Adiong said.
But the majority of the displaced still cannot return to their homes. Most are living with relatives, while others remain stuck in evacuation centers.
Del Rosario was unable to say whether their houses would be restored by the end of Duterte’s term.
While the reconstruction task force was created in 2017, the city’s rehabilitation has been a process marred by delays.
“The people of Marawi all wish to go home,” Mindanao Party List Representative Amihilda Sangcopan said after the reopening of Grand Mosque, as she called for the restoration of houses to be fast-tracked. “Let us give them the chance to feel the normalcy of life back, a life they used to have four years prior.”


Father of MP’s suspected killer ‘despises terrorists’ after run-ins with Al-Shabaab

Father of MP’s suspected killer ‘despises terrorists’ after run-ins with Al-Shabaab
Updated 18 October 2021

Father of MP’s suspected killer ‘despises terrorists’ after run-ins with Al-Shabaab

Father of MP’s suspected killer ‘despises terrorists’ after run-ins with Al-Shabaab
  • Ali Harbi Ali, 25, accused of stabbing David Amess to death on Friday
  • His father faced death threats from extremists while working for Somali government

LONDON: The father of the suspect accused of murdering British MP David Amess is said to “despise terrorists” after being targeted himself with death threats by Somali extremists.
Ali Harbi Ali, 25, from London, is being held by police over the suspected murder of Amess on Friday.
Ali is estranged from his parents, the Daily Mail reported, and his father Harbi Ali Kullane is said to “despise terrorists” after his time working alongside the Somali prime minister before coming to the UK in 1996.
A security source told the Daily Telegraph that Kullane was himself involved in countering extremist narratives while working with the Somali government.
The source said: “He was quite involved in countering Al-Shabaab’s message in his role as comms director, and he received death threats from them for doing so, which is common for anyone involved in a high-profile position in the government.”
Ali was referred to Britain’s counterterrorism program five years ago after his teachers noticed his views becoming increasingly radical.
Estranged from his family, the young man was enamored with hate preacher Anjem Choudary, who had himself been jailed on terrorism-related charges until recently.
Choudary’s videos, his former friends told The Sun, turned Ali from a “popular pupil into an extremist.”
Kullane has reportedly been in contact with British security services, who are analyzing Ali’s phone and looking for an explanation as to his movements and thought processes ahead of the sudden attack.
Officials are reportedly not yet clear on why the man chose Amess as the target, but a government insider told the Daily Telegraph: “He was unlucky. He was not targeted because of his political party. David Amess was not specifically targeted.”
Amess, 69, was stabbed 17 times during the attack, which took place during his surgery — weekly open meetings in which politicians meet their local constituents.
The attack has raised questions in Britain over the effectiveness of its de-radicalization program Prevent, which was already under review after a string of other terrorist incidents.
There have also been concerns that the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions to daily life might have radicalized more individuals, as people are spending more time alone and online.
“Counter-terror police and MI5 have been concerned for some time that once we emerged out of lockdown there would be more people out on the streets and more targets for the terrorists,” a security source told the Daily Telegraph.


UK govt urged to make good on Shariah-compliant loans promise

UK govt urged to make good on Shariah-compliant loans promise
Updated 18 October 2021

UK govt urged to make good on Shariah-compliant loans promise

UK govt urged to make good on Shariah-compliant loans promise
  • Survey: Thousands of Muslims miss out on university every year because they cannot access Shariah-compliant finance
  • Implementation of Islamic loan system a ‘question of political priority,’ expert tells Arab News

LONDON: MPs, campaigners and Islamic finance professionals will deliver a letter to UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Tuesday urging him to take action that would end the annual exclusion of thousands of British Muslims from higher education.

A survey by the Muslim Census, published on Monday, found that thousands of young British Muslims choose not to go to university every year because the loans they rely upon to fund their studies bear interest.

“There is a genuine and widespread need for ASF (alternative student financing), and its absence is leading to unequal access to university,” reads the letter signed by Lord Sharkey, MP David Timms, Islamic Finance Guru CEO Ibrahim Khan, Rizwan Yusoof of the National Zakat Foundation and Asha Hassan, a student finance campaigner.

It is religiously prohibited for Muslims to borrow or lend money upon which interest is paid. This means British-Muslim students are forced to pay up to £9,000 ($12,361) per year upfront for their education, as well as cover all their own living expenses.

Muslim Census found that of its survey’s 36,000 respondents, roughly 10 percent missed out on higher education entirely because of a lack of alternative financing options.

A further one in six self-financed their education, which “resulted in severe restrictions with regards to which course and university they decide to attend,” it said.

Extrapolated to the UK’s Muslim population as a whole, these results mean that more than 4,000 potential students are forgoing a university education every year, while close to 6,000 are forced to self-fund.

In 2013, then-Prime Minister David Cameron pledged to deal with the inequity in access to education for Muslims, saying: “Never again should a Muslim in Britain feel unable to go to university because they cannot get a student loan simply because of their religion.”

But nearly 10 years since that promise was first made, Muslims are still being forced to choose whether to pursue an education or stick to the principles of their religion, Hassan told Arab News.

“This is really important to our community, but we’ve so far felt like we have no voice. This letter is hopefully a chance for the prime minister to see that this is a big issue,” she said.

“There are thousands and thousands of students who have the grades, the ambition, the aspiration, but because they don’t feel like they can compromise on their religious convictions, they’re left with no option,” she added.

“Four out of five Muslims who do take out loans feel conflicted by it, but they’re in a position where they feel like they can’t do anything else about it.”

Omar Shaikh, managing director of the UK Islamic Finance Council, told Arab News that the creation of a financing system for British Muslims is “workable” and that its creation is a matter of politics, not practicality.

“UKIFC was appointed by the Department of Education to put together a detailed product that’s efficiently implementable and works at parity with the existing student loans system,” he said. 

“Following various workshops and input from the Student Loans Co., Shariah scholars, the Department for Education and lawyers, we were successfully able to create a workable pragmatic structure. We know it can be done and isn’t onerous to do so,” he added.

“It’s now a question of political priority. We look forward to the government progressing matters, and commend the Department for Education for driving this inclusive policy.”


French ambassador ordered out of Belarus in diplomatic spat

French ambassador ordered out of Belarus in diplomatic spat
Updated 18 October 2021

French ambassador ordered out of Belarus in diplomatic spat

French ambassador ordered out of Belarus in diplomatic spat
  • France’s Foreign Minister said ambassador’s departure on Sunday was due to the “unilateral decision” of Belarusian authorities
  • Belarusian Foreign Ministry said the emergency departure of the French ambassador is connected with his unwillingness to present his credentials to Lukashenko

PARIS: France says that its ambassador to Belarus has been ordered out of the country.
In a communique Monday, France’s Foreign Minister said that Ambassador Nicolas de Lacosate’s departure on Sunday was due to the “unilateral decision” of Belarusian authorities.
Local media say the move to kick the ambassador out is linked to a fallout over the non-recognition by France, and other European Union countries, of Lukashenko’s re-election in August 2020.
The Belarusian Foreign Ministry said that the emergency departure of the French ambassador from the country is connected with his unwillingness to present his credentials to Lukashenko.
“The head of the French diplomatic mission did not express readiness to complete the procedure for assuming office as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the Republic of Belarus, which is stipulated by international law and generally recognized practice,” said Anatoly Glaz, press secretary of the Belarusian Foreign Ministry.
France’s Foreign Ministry explained that de Lacoste did not present his credentials to Lukashenko because it was “in line with the common European position of not recognizing the legitimacy of the outcome of the August 2020 presidential election.”
Lukashenko claimed victory in a sixth presidential term but the election was marred by claims of widespread voter fraud. More than 35,000 people were arrested and thousands beaten by police for protesting against Lukashenko’s sixth term after an election in August 2020 that the opposition condemned as fraudulent and many Western countries refused to recognize as valid.
The French ambassador arrived in Minsk after the controversial presidential election. In December, he handed copies of his credentials to the Belarusian foreign minister, but did not want to meet with Lukashenko.
De Lacoste actively met with representatives of civil society and politicians in Belarus. Among the latest meetings were negotiations in Minsk with activists of the opposition “Tell the Truth” movement, which was closed by the authorities. And also a meeting on Oct. 16 with the ex-leader of Belarus Stanislav Shushkevich, who sharply criticizes the current government.
Belarusian opposition figure Pavel Latushko — a former Belarusian ambassador to France — called on the French ambassador to continue his mission from Lithuania.
“The French Ambassador may continue his mission in the interests of developing relations between France and Belarusian society from Vilnius,” Latushko said. “The regime is entering open conflict both with neighboring countries and with the leading states in world politics.”
Calling it an “unjustified decision,” France said it has taken proportionate measures regarding Belarusian diplomats in France. Belarusian Ambassador to France Igor Fisenko was recalled to Minsk for consultations, the Belarusian Foreign Ministry said.