Dubai gets another Guinness World Records entry in the energy sector

Dubai gets another Guinness World Records entry in the energy sector
The Jebel Ali complex of the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) has an electricity generation capacity of 9,547 megawatts. (File/AFP)
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Updated 02 March 2021

Dubai gets another Guinness World Records entry in the energy sector

Dubai gets another Guinness World Records entry in the energy sector
  • Dubai project recognized as largest single-site natural gas power facility in the world

DUBAI: Dubai has chalked up another Guinness World Records entry — and this time it’s for a gas project.

The Jebel Ali complex of the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) has been recognized as the largest single-site natural gas power generation facility in the world, state news agency WAM reported.

The complex has an electricity generation capacity of 9,547 megawatts.

The emirate has been a prolific participant in the Guinness Book of Records, which first appeared in 1955 and has since sold more than 143 million copies.

“DEWA has created comprehensive electricity infrastructure development plans based on demand forecast until 2030,” Saeed Mohammed Al-Tayer, chief executive of the authority, said.

DEWA provides services to over one million customers.

Located on the southern fringe of Dubai, the plant was extended in 2019 and now has a capacity of 2,885 megawatts of electricity and 140 million gallons of desalinated water per day.

The award comes as the authority undergoes key updates in its operations, including the application of artificial intelligence and other “disruptive” technologies.

“This has resulted in DEWA improving its generation efficiency by 33.41 percent, which also helped achieve considerable financial savings,” Al-Tayer said.

He added: “This improvement has also reduced more than 64 million tons of carbon emissions, which are equivalent to planting 327 million trees. It has also reduced more than 46,000 tons of nitrogen oxide gases and over 3,000 tons of sulfur dioxide.”