Facebook launches #MonthofGood campaign for Ramadan

Facebook launches #MonthofGood campaign for Ramadan
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Updated 17 April 2021

Facebook launches #MonthofGood campaign for Ramadan

Facebook launches #MonthofGood campaign for Ramadan
  • Instagram initially developed its Ideas of Good campaign, now in its third year, as a result of a key insigh

This Ramadan, Facebook is marking the holy month with a global campaign across its family of apps. The #MonthofGood campaign, which brings together Facebook, Instagram, Messenger and WhatsApp, aims to celebrate charity, collaboration and community.

Despite the social distancing resulting from the pandemic, Ramadan remains a time for charity and celebration. Globally, in 2020 people raised twice as much as in 2019 through Ramadan-related fundraisers across Facebook and Instagram. “We saw our users rally behind multiple causes, raising over $5 billion for nonprofits and personal causes through fundraisers on Facebook and Instagram,” Ramez Shehadi, Managing Director at Facebook MENA, told Arab News.

Instagram initially developed its Ideas of Good campaign, now in its third year, as a result of a key insight, said Shehadi, which was that “Ramadan is the kindest time of the year on the platform.”

“In 2019, we saw people post about not only charitable activities, but also finding time to reflect as well as bond with their families,” he said. There were more than 16 million uses of the word Ramadan and references to Ramadan hit 4 million in the 30 days leading up to the holy month. There was a 40 percent growth in the use of the word “kindness” on Instagram across the world in the 30 days leading up to the holy month.

“Last year was drastically different – we saw Muslims around the world spend their first Ramadan in lockdown and it was a unique experience to observe a season known for its strong sense of togetherness and collaboration, in isolation,” he said. However, the Muslim community found new ways of gathering, donating and celebrating virtually, which inspired the initial Instagram campaign.

In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and Turkey, more than 6.5 million people joined the Ramadan-related groups created in 2020. For instance, “LyedFeLyed اليد في اليد ” is a group created last year that aims to connect families in need with donors and associations. “As of May last year, it had already helped 700 families, within days of opening the group,” said Shehadi. Other groups that arose during the pandemic are “Stop and Help”, founded by Heather Harries, her husband and two sons from the UAE, which aims to lift community spirits during the pandemic by offering support to families in need of basic essentials and “UAE Fusion Socialites,” which is founded by Sharjah-based Pakistani mother, Ayesha Sohail, who uses her social media skills to help low-income families.

This year, Facebook has extended the campaign across all its platforms as the #MonthofGood because it’s a “no-brainer,” according to Shehadi. “As a collective for four apps, we have the opportunity to amplify this effect, providing more platforms and more tools for organisations and individuals to explore, express and inspire good.”

Facebook will be running various activations across the globe in locations including India, US, UK, Nigeria and MENA focusing on the pillars of kindness, community and charity.

These include:

“Ideas of Good,” a list of 30 kind deeds and do-good moments to act on virtually.

“Guide to Ramadan” by Canadian creator Sarah Sabry, in collaboration with her Muslim followers.

A pay-it-forward chain globally, which will be kicked off by creators such as Haifa Beseisso, Nabih Alkayali, Raha Moharrak, Logina Salah, and Adel Aladwani in the MENA region.

Live Suhoor Talks, a global series hosted by Muslim creators across the UK, Asia and MENA, featuring weekly conversations about topics ranging from food and fasting to mental health and wellbeing.

Facebook Watch and IGTV series with creators such as Khalid Al-Ameri and Manal Al-Alem and networks MBC, TVision, and Zee Entertainment.

A MENA-specific collaboration with Jordan-based Arabic podcast network Sowt spotlighting inspiring community leaders from the regional diaspora to talk about how they use Facebook Apps for virtual acts of kindness during Ramadan.

Spotlighting zakat-eligible nonprofits such as Rahma Worldwide, UNHCR, Heroic Hearts, Molham Volunteering Team and Zakat Foundation of America with active Ramadan fundraisers and campaigns to provide food baskets, supplies and medical aid to orphans, widows and refugees.

Additionally, Facebook will spotlight small and medium businesses (SMBs) that have inspired good this Ramadan. “These are businesses that have gone above and beyond to help people around them and their communities, with their acts of charity and kindness,” said Shehadi.

The increased time spent on Facebook’s apps during the holy month also presents a significant opportunity for advertisers. “Ramadan is one of the biggest and longest global festive moments. Given the current circumstances we are in, people need positivity during the holy month and therefore feel-good themes always work at Ramadan if you do it right.”

“It’s also powerful if you can connect people to a real-life opportunity to do good,” he said. For instance, in 2018, Facebook partnered with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the creative agency Leo Burnett Beirut to boost blood donations during Ramadan in a campaign called “Giving is in your blood,” which reached more than 28 million people across the Middle East and increased blood donations by 36 percent on average.

“We see a lot of brands engage with consumers in a personalised and relevant way during Ramadan too,” he added. For instance, Nestlé MENA developed a bilingual, informative bot for Messenger, in partnership with Facebook’s Creative Shop, that raised awareness of the content and services provided by its brands during Ramadan and helped Nestlé to gain insights about its consumers’ eating habits and preferences.


CNN journalist manhandled by Israeli forces

CNN journalist manhandled by Israeli forces
Updated 19 May 2021

CNN journalist manhandled by Israeli forces

CNN journalist manhandled by Israeli forces

RIYADH: Social media footage has shown CNN staff being surrounded and pushed by Israeli forces.
The clip shows Ben Wedeman, a CNN senior correspondent, being encircled by Israeli soldiers near a stone barrier before being shoved away from it.

Wedeman, who has reported on conflicts in Syria and a previous war in Gaza in 2014, can be seen walking away despondently while inspecting his hand, which may have been injured during the incident. 
The video was tweeted by Mark Stone, Sky News’ Middle East correspondent, who has been reporting for the broadcaster from the region.
In the same clip, another member of the press is seen being violently pushed by another soldier.
The Sky News reporter indicated that the behavior by the Israeli forces in the video isn’t an isolated incident.
“It’s happened to us all this week,” he says before recounting an interaction with Israeli police.
“Today I walked past a policeman. I smiled and said hello. ‘F*ck off’ he said,” the reporter wrote.

 

In another Tweet, Stone says: “I saw a lot more instances of entirely unnecessary, provocative behavior by Israeli police/military today. At Damascus Gate (stun grenades thrown at peaceful Palestinian group), in Sheikh Jarrah (skunk water fired on Palestinian homes) & Bethlehem (volleys of tear gas).”
On Tuesday, the continuing violent exchanges of heavy airstrikes and rocket fire between Israelis and Palestinians claimed more lives.
Protestors and Israeli security forces clashed at multiple locations across the occupied West Bank and in east Jerusalem.
On Saturday, an Israeli strike destroyed a building in Gaza City that housed offices of The Associated Press (AP) and other media outlets. The building was evacuated before the strike.
US Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Monday said he had not seen any Israeli evidence that Hamas was operating from the building.
AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt said his organization was seeking “information from the Israeli government and are engaged with the US State Department to try to learn more” and said the “world will know less about what is happening in Gaza because of what happened today.”
According to Aidan White, founder of the Ethical Journalism Network, the destruction of media assets in Gaza City is serious but by no means unusual. “If one looks back over the past 25 years, the targeting of media institutions and journalists themselves has increased dramatically,” he told Arab News.
This is happening “not least because the capacity of the media to report from war zones — and to be able to report wrongdoing and inappropriate behavior or war crimes — is greatly enhanced, and changing technology has had a lot to do with it.”


How the inconvenient truth of Jeff Bezos’s fabricated ‘phone leak’ story revealed a deeply-rooted media bias against Saudi Arabia

Bloomberg Businessweek published an excerpt from journalist and author Brad Stone’s tell-all book on the Amazon chief which revealed the truth behind the leak. (Amazon Unbound)
Bloomberg Businessweek published an excerpt from journalist and author Brad Stone’s tell-all book on the Amazon chief which revealed the truth behind the leak. (Amazon Unbound)
Updated 18 May 2021

How the inconvenient truth of Jeff Bezos’s fabricated ‘phone leak’ story revealed a deeply-rooted media bias against Saudi Arabia

Bloomberg Businessweek published an excerpt from journalist and author Brad Stone’s tell-all book on the Amazon chief which revealed the truth behind the leak. (Amazon Unbound)
  • Many US, UK publications rushed to blame Saudi Arabia for the leak of the 2020 scandal, but only four retracted their stories when the truth emerged that Riyadh had nothing to do with it
  • Experts slam the now Bezos-owned Washington Post for failing to report fairly on him after recent book revealed that leak came from former brother-in-law, not Saudi Arabia

LONDON: On May 8, Saudi Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Adel Aljubeir took to Twitter to ask whether or not those who have accused the Kingdom of the so-called Bezos Hack would come forward and acknowledge their mistake, or “simply delete their tweets and hope that their positions at the time disappear into the sunset?”

The Bezos Hack refers to an incident in January 2020 when Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was accused, without any proof, of illegally tapping into the phone of Amazon’s Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos. The crown prince was accused of leaking news of the affair with presenter Lauren Sanchez to US tabloid the National Enquirer because of Bezos’s ownership of the Washington Post.

For over a year, major Western news outlets — from the New York Times and Washington Post to Britain’s Guardian and Daily Telegraph — have peddled story after story of the alleged leak by Saudi Arabia and each revelation that came afterwards.

And yet, when Bloomberg Businessweek published an excerpt from journalist and author Brad Stone’s tell-all book on the Amazon chief which revealed the truth behind the leak, the final follow-up story never came.

“This was a serious accusation and if evidence emerges that it’s untrue it’s important that media outlets either report this or correct their previous stories,” William Neal, a London-based strategic communications consultant, told Arab News.

“More broadly, too often Western outlets are keen to cast Saudi Arabia in a negative light rather than reporting the facts. Their audience deserves to see the full picture, not partial reporting,” Neal said.

The truth — which appears to have involved nothing more than Sanchez’s Hollywood B-list agent brother selling his sister out for $200,000 in what was described as a “public-relations masterstroke” from Bezos —  was not as useful to the outlets as a falsified Saudi connection was.

The Saudi angle, as Stone notes, was “only a fog of overlapping events, weak ties between disparate figures and more strange coincidences.”

He added: “For Bezos and his advisers, though, who were still trying to positively spin the embarrassing events surrounding his divorce, such a cloud of uncertainty was at the very least distracting from the more unsavory and complicated truth.”

A two-week media monitoring period by Arab News since the Bloomberg Businessweek revelation saw few Western outlets publish features on the latest update or correct their previous reporting, which has now been proven to be unsubstantiated.

Outlets including the New York Times and CNN, among others, did not run the story — a decision which goes against their supposed professional journalism practices and industry norms. Meanwhile, the Bezos-owned Washington Post found itself in its own conflict of interest where it vehemently defended its owner throughout the ordeal, while keeping silent over the latest findings.

“I would say that it does show bias when media outlets don’t take the time to correct incorrect claims, and issue corrections when new information comes out. Or sometimes what we'll see is they will issue the correction, but they'll do it quietly. So then, the original incorrect story got a lot more attention.” Julie Mastrine, director of marketing at AllSides, a US media watchdog, told Arab News.

“Our position is that ‘there is no such thing as unbiased news’ and what people really need to do is become aware of that and then learn how to spot bias and read broadly across the political spectrum so that they get multiple perspectives that can kind of challenge them to think critically and consider multiple angles.”

The Bezos-Washington Post conflict of interest has, however, been the subject of coverage by the New York Post and the Wall Street Journal. They, as well as the Daily Mail and The Times of London, have published features revealing how Bezos took advantage of his ownership of the Washington Post and of former US President Donald Trump’s alleged ties to the National Enquirer to cast himself as a “political target.”

The Journal’s Holman W. Jenkins wrote in a column: “Seldom will you find a newspaper admitting that it lied to you unless it can push the blame off on a plagiarizing or fabulizing reporter who will be said to have defrauded his or her own editors and institution. Now the Washington Post has an owner who fits this description.”

Amazon Founder Jeff Bezos (R) and his partner US new anchor Lauren Sanchez. (File/AFP)

A Saudi newspaper editor and a member of the Saudi Journalists Association said: “This wouldn’t be the first time that Western media has been accused of foregoing the standards of journalism that it holds others accountable for.”

They added: “It is understandable that in our industry, most editors prefer bad news and scandals. Nobody is asking these British and American newspapers for favorable coverage of Saudi Arabia, what we as fellow journalists expect of them however is to abide by their own professional standards and retract or apologize for the false stories they published.”

Other examples of bias in Western media came last March when a Houthi-caused fire at a Yemeni migrant detention center killed scores of Ethiopians. Fewer than a handful of Western media outlets covered the incident. Meanwhile, any mistakes committed by Saudi Arabia — ones that the Kingdom has acknowledged and apologized for —  are immediately scrutinized by the press.

The lack of coverage of the migrant fire even stoked criticism from one of Black Lives Matter Greater New York’s founding members.

“This is an issue that needs attention. This is something that can’t be ignored. This is something I won’t ignore. There are 44 people murdered and the news isn’t paying attention,” Hawk Newsome said in an interview on the Arab News-sponsored Ray Hanania radio show.

“I have strong reason to believe that the news isn’t paying attention because they’re black people. It’s my duty to fight for black people across the world.”

Twitter: @Tarek_AliAhmad


Israel under fire for ‘sickening’ rocket emoji tweets

Israel under fire for ‘sickening’ rocket emoji tweets
Updated 18 May 2021

Israel under fire for ‘sickening’ rocket emoji tweets

Israel under fire for ‘sickening’ rocket emoji tweets
  • The social media account, reportedly managed by the foreign minister, claimed that the posts refer to the number of rockets fired at Israeli citizens by Hamas
  • Critics argued, however, that the posts, which came amid fresh Israeli strikes on Gaza, were insensitive

LONDON: Israel has come under fire for posting hundreds of rocket emojis on the state’s Twitter account on Monday amid its heavy bombardment of Gaza.

The social media account, reportedly managed by the foreign minister, claimed that the posts refer to the number of rockets fired at Israeli citizens by Hamas. 

Israel clarified that the tweets were merely an attempt to give viewers a perspective on the recent airstrikes. 

The tweets were accompanied by a message that read: “Just to give you all some perspective, these (rocket emojis) are the total amount of rockets shot at Israeli civilians. Each one of these rockets is meant to kill. Make no mistake. Every rocket has an address. What would you do if that address was yours?”

Critics argued, however, that the posts, which came amid fresh Israeli strikes on Gaza, were insensitive. 

The Israeli bombing campaign has killed at least 213 Palestinians so far, including 61 children, with more than 1,400 people wounded, according to the Gaza Health Ministry.

The tweets were met with heavy criticism online. Louis Fishman, an associate professor at Brooklyn College, City University of New York, tweeted that “Israel has lost the diplomatic front in this war. It is now left to emojis. Really, this is pathetic.”

Others online called the tweet “sickeningly cruel and vindictive”, “deranged” and “beyond vile.” 

Israel has escalated its violent campaign on Palestine, with more than 52,000 Palestinians displaced and hundreds of buildings destroyed in the Gaza Strip.


Israeli reporters facing physical attacks and online threats

Israeli reporters facing physical attacks and online threats
Updated 18 May 2021

Israeli reporters facing physical attacks and online threats

Israeli reporters facing physical attacks and online threats
  • The N12 channel provided security details for four of its on-air reporters – Dana Weiss, Guy Peleg, Yonit Levi and Rina Mazliah – after a rise in online threats against them
  • Journalist and presenter Ayala Hasson was part of a TV crew that was assaulted in Lod with rocks last week by people from the far-right group La Familia

LONDON: A rise in physical attacks and online threats against high-profile TV reporters perpetrated by members of far-right Jewish groups has been recorded in Israel and Palestine, with one media outlet providing security for some of its journalists as a result.

The N12 channel provided security details for four of its on-air reporters – Dana Weiss, Guy Peleg, Yonit Levi and Rina Mazliah – after a rise in online threats against them. One suspect has been arrested in connection to the threats made against Weiss.

Reporters from Channel 12, Israel’s public broadcaster Kan News, and Channel 13 were attacked after extremists took to the streets to target Israeli citizens of Palestinian origin in locations including Tel Aviv and Lod. 

Journalist and presenter Ayala Hasson was part of a TV crew that was assaulted in Lod with rocks last week by people from the far-right group La Familia. 

Concern over journalist safety has increased significantly since Israel bombed a Gaza tower block used by Associated Press and Al Jazeera at the weekend.


Customer experience firm promotes key managers in MENA region

Customer experience firm promotes key managers in MENA region
Vimal Badiani, MD of Merkle and dentsu’s Customer Experience Management (CXM) Service Line for MENA
Updated 18 May 2021

Customer experience firm promotes key managers in MENA region

Customer experience firm promotes key managers in MENA region
  • Vimal Badiani made MD of Merkle, Dentsu’s CXM Service Line, and will be responsible for leading and growing the business
  • Beth Williams becomes Merkle’s head of performance media

DUBAI: Vimal Badiani has been promoted to managing director of customer experience management (CXM) company Merkle, which is part of Dentsu.

And he will also head Dentsu’s CXM service line for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

In his new role, Badiani will be responsible for leading and growing the business by helping clients deliver a total customer experience.

Previously head of performance, he has been part of the Dentsu group for nearly five years. He joined Merkle UK in 2016 to oversee paid search through the acquisition of Periscopix, which is now Merkle’s media agency, and moved to the MENA region in 2017 to develop Merkle’s performance business.

“My focus will be on delivering growth and maturity through new business support and existing client engagement, providing a total customer experience, underpinned by a strong data foundation, proof in performance media execution, and highlighting the value of CRM (customer relationship management) strategies for nurture,” said Badiani.

Beth Williams, the newly appointed head of performance media at Merkle MENA, has been part the business for eight years, gaining market experience in Europe, the Asia-Pacific region, and now MENA.

She joined Merkle at the beginning of her career in 2014 as an associate and has experience across ad tech platforms as well as building additional service lines for Merkle MENA in feed management. In her new position, Williams will oversee Merkle’s growing performance team in Dubai and Lebanon.