Ramadan business picks up for London’s Arab eateries as coronavirus restrictions ease

Syrian supermarket Dimashqi provides all the standard food products and delicacies from the Middle East. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
1 / 27
Syrian supermarket Dimashqi provides all the standard food products and delicacies from the Middle East. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Syrian supermarket Dimashqi provides all the standard food products and delicacies from the Middle East. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
2 / 27
Syrian supermarket Dimashqi provides all the standard food products and delicacies from the Middle East. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Dimashqi supermarket and Ayam Zaman restaurant, based in Shepherd’s Bush in West London, are some of the favored Syrian spots in the city. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
3 / 27
Dimashqi supermarket and Ayam Zaman restaurant, based in Shepherd’s Bush in West London, are some of the favored Syrian spots in the city. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Syrian supermarket Dimashqi provides all the standard food products and delicacies from the Middle East. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
4 / 27
Syrian supermarket Dimashqi provides all the standard food products and delicacies from the Middle East. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Syrian supermarket Dimashqi provides all the standard food products and delicacies from the Middle East. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
5 / 27
Syrian supermarket Dimashqi provides all the standard food products and delicacies from the Middle East. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Ayam Zaman restaurant have closed their seating area and are only providing takeaway services during Ramadan and Eid. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
6 / 27
Ayam Zaman restaurant have closed their seating area and are only providing takeaway services during Ramadan and Eid. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
7 / 27
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
8 / 27
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
9 / 27
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
10 / 27
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
11 / 27
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
12 / 27
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
13 / 27
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
14 / 27
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
15 / 27
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
16 / 27
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
17 / 27
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Based in Shepherd’s Bush in West London, Naama opened in 2003 and specializes in Lebanese cuisine. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
18 / 27
Based in Shepherd’s Bush in West London, Naama opened in 2003 and specializes in Lebanese cuisine. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Naama restaurant and butcher has closed their seating area and are only providing takeaway services during Ramadan and Eid. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
19 / 27
Naama restaurant and butcher has closed their seating area and are only providing takeaway services during Ramadan and Eid. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Naama restaurant and butcher has closed their seating area and are only providing takeaway services during Ramadan and Eid. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
20 / 27
Naama restaurant and butcher has closed their seating area and are only providing takeaway services during Ramadan and Eid. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Ayam Zaman restaurant offers meals of the day for iftar, but have had to reduce their menu this year. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
21 / 27
Ayam Zaman restaurant offers meals of the day for iftar, but have had to reduce their menu this year. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Dimashqi supermarket and Ayam Zaman restaurant, based in Shepherd’s Bush in West London, are some of the favored Syrian spots in the city. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
22 / 27
Dimashqi supermarket and Ayam Zaman restaurant, based in Shepherd’s Bush in West London, are some of the favored Syrian spots in the city. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Naama restaurant and butcher has closed their seating area and are only providing takeaway services during Ramadan and Eid. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
23 / 27
Naama restaurant and butcher has closed their seating area and are only providing takeaway services during Ramadan and Eid. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Based in Shepherd’s Bush in West London, Naama opened in 2003 and specializes in Lebanese cuisine. Pictured Director Moussa Merhi. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
24 / 27
Based in Shepherd’s Bush in West London, Naama opened in 2003 and specializes in Lebanese cuisine. Pictured Director Moussa Merhi. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Ayam Zaman restaurant offers meals of the day for iftar, but have had to reduce their menu this year. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
25 / 27
Ayam Zaman restaurant offers meals of the day for iftar, but have had to reduce their menu this year. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
26 / 27
Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
27 / 27
The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
Short Url
Updated 09 May 2021

Ramadan business picks up for London’s Arab eateries as coronavirus restrictions ease

Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)
  • The gradual easing of COVID-19 restrictions has contributed to a sharp increase in trade
  • UK’s third national lockdown was partially lifted on April 12 and outdoor dining is permitted at restaurants and cafes

LONDON: During Ramadan last year, the pandemic took a heavy toll on the famed Arab restaurants and food stores in west London.
This year, however, a combination of shrewd business decisions and the gradual easing of COVID-19 restrictions has contributed to a sharp increase in trade for many and brought hope that the worst of the pandemic might be over.
“People can’t practice Ramadan as usual but we tried to make it in a different and safer way...and this year, we are more prepared and organized,” Khaled Alghorani, the manager of Dimashqi, a Syrian supermarket in Shepherd’s Bush, told Arab News.

The store is extremely popular; it stocks standard food items alongside delicacies from the Middle East, making it a favored Syrian spot. Like other business owners in the area, however, Alghorani has had to adapt the services he provides in response to the realities of the pandemic.
“We have new special offers and we introduced an online service, so customers can place orders for groceries, halal meats and desserts and we can deliver anywhere in the UK in chilled packages so they receive the food as fresh as it is in the supermarket,” said Alghorani.
The holy month, which began on April 13, has been somewhat of a blessing, he added. Shelves are restocked daily after iftar so customers can shop with ease during the day while adhering to preventative measures. Popular items include soups, drinks, sweets, dates, apricot paste (Qamar Al-Din) and maarouk, a traditional brioche-like bread filled with dates that is only made during Ramadan.




Syrian supermarket Dimashqi provides all the standard food products and delicacies from the Middle East. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)

“Because of the pandemic we had a shortage of some products and we had delays as well, but by the end we managed to get most of the stock for Ramadan,” said Alghorani.
The supermarket shares its space with Ayam Zaman, one of the top Syrian and Middle Eastern restaurants in the city. It has managed to remain open throughout the pandemic but has had to restrict its services and is not offering as wide a variety of special Ramadan dishes as it usually does.
“People prefer to dine in a restaurant than sitting at home, especially on Eid. But unfortunately because of the lockdown, which is going to end on May 17, we are going to continue with takeaway orders only, with new offers on desserts,” said Alghorani.




Ayam Zaman restaurant offers meals of the day for iftar, but have had to reduce their menu this year. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)

“Before COVID-19, Ramadan used to be the busiest time; we had better services, better sales and the restaurant wouldn’t have any reservations (available) — we were fully booked, because people like to sit and break their fast together.”
The restaurant also normally supplies iftar for office employees during Ramadan but because the majority of staff is still working from home, that service has taken a huge hit and the restaurant is instead relying on private functions.
The UK’s third national lockdown was partially lifted on April 12; non-essential shops were allowed to reopen, outdoor dining is permitted at restaurants and cafes, and up to 15 people from three households can meet and socialize outdoors.




Naama restaurant and butcher has closed their seating area and are only providing takeaway services during Ramadan and Eid. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)

“The lockdown (eased) and the weather was good, so people were happy and I think everybody’s in the mood to go outside, do shopping and even eat outside,” Moussa Merhi, general manager of the Naama restaurant and butcher’s shop in Shepherd’s Bush, told Arab News.
He said business is picking up and this year is much better than last. People appear calmer, less scared of the disease and are spending money but no longer panic buying, he added.
He said Naama is not focusing on iftar as it normally does during Ramadan because most people are eating at home, but that the restaurant is receiving a surprising amount of delivery orders. Like Ayam Zaman, Naama is still restricting its service to takeaways and deliveries, to protect the health of its staff.

The well-established restaurant, which opened in 2003, specializes in Lebanese cuisine. One of its specialties is a whole lamb on a bed of rice, garnished with toasted nuts.
“People are now gathering a lot. It’s not like last year,” said Merhi. “This year it’s different — people are holding iftars (and) I am receiving big orders for large amounts of money. I think they had enough from the last lockdown.
“It’s a blessed month and it’s to do with the environment and providing good service to people who are fasting. It’s good for business, don’t get me wrong, but the main concept is to help people and I think everybody is trying and helping in their own way.”




Based in Shepherd’s Bush in West London, Naama opened in 2003 and specializes in Lebanese cuisine. Pictured Director Moussa Merhi. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)

Bosses at cafe and bakery Pistachio and Honey also said that they are finding business easier this Ramadan compared with last year.
“People got to know more about the coronavirus, they got to know more about how to socialize and how to social distance,” director Anas Sheekh Aly told Arab News.
Aside from being scared to leave their houses last year, people were also scared to eat sugar, he said, due to the uncertainty about the disease and the limited information that was available.




Pistachio and Honey have managed to weather the storm and opened their second, larger branch a few months ago. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)

A year on and many people have received a vaccine or caught the virus and recovered, Aly said, and the lockdown is also less strict. However the economic effects of the pandemic mean that a lot of people have less money to spend on non-essentials and are put off by high prices, he added, which has affected his business.
Sweets and desserts are a major part of the Ramadan table, and certain varieties are only made during the holy month, particularly qatayef, awama (luqaimat), namoura, madlouka, maghshousha and halawet el-jibn. The bakery makes all of these from scratch, along with its flagship product: qishta (a type of clotted cream). Aly has acquired the only license in the UK to make qishta from raw cow’s milk in the traditional, authentic way.
“It’s quite a hard process but this helps us get the real taste coming from our countries,” said Aly. “But our prices are very cost-effective, our sweets are healthy — we use less sugar, pure butter ghee and pure flour — and we are using all of the finest ingredients.”




The recently-opened Pistachio and Honey cafe and bakery makes everything from scratch using the finest ingredients. (AN photo/Sarah Glubb)

The area around the cafe is always fragrant with the scent of fresh-baked kanafeh, which it makes from scratch using akawi, baladi and Nabulsi cheese to get the authentic taste, unlike some other bakeries that use mozzarella.
Originally from Syria, Aly opened the first branch of his business on March 25 last year, a day before the first lockdown was imposed. By the time the restrictions eased and he could reopen, most of his stock had expired. Although he suffered heavy losses as additional lockdowns were imposed, he managed to weather the storm and opened his second, larger branch: like the first, in Acton — a few months ago.
“Ramadan is a month of blessing and you don’t even know how livelihood will come to you,” said Aly. “For business it’s very good; even if you don’t do anything you will get business in Ramadan.” But he added that the true spirit of the month is felt in one’s heart and we should appreciate what we have.
“There are refugees all over the world that don’t have food or water to drink,” he said. “It gets you to feel more about them, it gets you to feel more about people who are starving and thirsty, and so you do more religion and you appreciate what you have more — and this is what we teach our kids as well when we get them to fast.”


Canada pays final homage to Muslim family killed in terror attack

Canada pays final homage to Muslim family killed in terror attack
Updated 13 June 2021

Canada pays final homage to Muslim family killed in terror attack

Canada pays final homage to Muslim family killed in terror attack
  • Canadian PM Trudeau called the killings a “terrorist attack” and vowed to clamp down on far-right groups and online hate
  • The four victims were killed by Nathaniel Veltman while they were out for an evening walk near their home in London, Ontario

LONDON, Canada: Several hundred people gathered in London, Ontario on Saturday to pay homage to a Muslim family deliberately mowed down by the driver of a pick-up truck, in an attack that has shocked Canadians and which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau denounced as “terrorist.”
Four members of the Afzaal family — a man and his wife, their teenage daughter and his mother — were out for a walk in their London neighborhood Sunday when a 20-year-old man in a black pickup truck drove into them on purpose, according to authorities.
A fifth family member, a nine-year-old boy, was seriously injured.
On Saturday, hundreds of people filled a large parking lot and a football field next to the London Islamic center, where a private ceremony was held, to join in a public remembrance around the family’s four caskets, each covered with a Canadian flag.
“The very fact that their coffins are draped in the beautiful Canadian flag is a testimony of the fact that the entire Canadian nation stands with them,” Pakistan’s ambassador to Canada, Raza Bashir Tarar, told the crowd.
The ceremony, with brief remarks and prayers, was broadcast live on major Canadian networks.
“We are not alone in our grief,” said Ali Islam, an uncle of Madiha Salman, one of the victims. He stressed that the outpouring of support “has been the first step toward finding a way to heal.”
“We realized that our extended family was much larger than we could have ever imagined.”
Another speaker at the event, Sajid Ali Mohamed, noted that the attack on the Muslim family has been described as terrorism, instead of being blamed on mental illness.
“If it’s not a turning point, at least it’s a nudge in the right direction,” he said.

Pallbearers arrange the caskets at a funeral service for the terror attack victims in London, Ontario, on June 12, 2021. (Geoff Robins/The Canadian Press via AP)

The funeral cortege then headed to a cemetery — as people lined the route in a show of solidarity — for the private burial of Salman Afzaal, 46, his wife Madiha, 44, their daughter Yumna, 15 and Salman’s mother Talat, 74.
Many people wore either green ribbons, in support of the Muslim community, or mauve ones, Yumna’s favorite color.The attack has badly shaken the Muslim community and other Canadians as well.
Numerous vigils and solemn commemorations have taken place across Canada in recent days.
On Friday, several thousand people joined in an ecumenical walk through the streets of London, which is home to some 30,000 Muslims.
Many bore posters reading “We are all human” or “Hate kills.”
People also paid homage Friday in Quebec City, where a January 2017 mosque shooting claimed six lives.
The latest attack has fueled debate about the prevalence of Islamophobia in Canada and, within the Muslim community heightened fears that outward signs of religious affiliation can make a person a target.
In an interview with the CBC network, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan said the attack had shocked people across Pakistan.
He called on the international community to take action against “hate websites which create hatred among human beings.”
“Some international leaders, or leaders in the Western countries, actually don’t understand this phenomenon,” he added in excerpts of the interview released ahead of its broadcast on Sunday.
Twenty-year-old Nathaniel Veltman, who has no criminal record and no known link to any extremist group, has been charged in the attack with four counts of first-degree murder and one of attempted murder.
Police say the attack was planned and motivated by hatred, and have not ruled out adding terrorism-related charges.
Trudeau has promised to step up the fight against extremist groups.
Following the attack, Canadian deputies adopted a nonbinding resolution, introduced by the left-leaning New Democratic Party, calling for a national summit on Islamophobia this summer — as many Canadian Muslim organizations have demanded.


Shooting in Texas capital leaves 14 wounded; one suspect still at large

Shooting in Texas capital leaves 14 wounded; one suspect still at large
Updated 13 June 2021

Shooting in Texas capital leaves 14 wounded; one suspect still at large

Shooting in Texas capital leaves 14 wounded; one suspect still at large
  • Two of the injured were in hospital in critical condition and the other 12 were in stable condition

TEXAS: Fourteen people were wounded after two men opened fire at each other in a busy entertainment district in downtown Austin, Texas early on Saturday, police said, adding that one of the suspected shooters remained at large.
Gunfire erupted at about 1:30 a.m. in the Sixth Street area, a popular nightlife destination in the state capital, Austin Police Department Interim Chief Joseph Chacon said in a news conference on Saturday afternoon.
"This does appear to be an isolated incident between two parties," he said. "Most of the victims were innocent bystanders."
Police officers who were nearby rushed to the scene where they applied tourniquets and performed CPR on victims, Chacon said.
Two of the injured were in hospital in critical condition and the other 12 were in stable condition. There were no deaths, Chacon said.
The Austin Police Department said on Saturday evening that one suspect had been arrested with the help of the US Marshals Lone Star Fugitive Task Force, and that officers were continuing to follow up on leads to apprehend the remaining suspect.


Hong Kong democracy activist Agnes Chow released from prison

Hong Kong democracy activist Agnes Chow released from prison
Agnes Chow rose to prominence as a student leader in the now defunct Scholarism and Demosisto political groups, alongside other outspoken activists. (AP)
Updated 13 June 2021

Hong Kong democracy activist Agnes Chow released from prison

Hong Kong democracy activist Agnes Chow released from prison
  • Chow, along with Wong and Nathan Law, who has since been given asylum in Britain, came to prominence as teenage activists during the 2014 protests to demand universal suffrage

HONG KONG: Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Agnes Chow was released from prison on Saturday after serving nearly seven months for her role in an unauthorized assembly during anti-government protests in the city in 2019.
The 24-year-old activist had been convicted together with her long-time activist colleague, Joshua Wong, for their involvement in an illegal rally near police headquarters in the Chinese-ruled city.
Wong remains in prison and the reason for Chow’s early release after being sentenced to 10 months in jail was not clear.
Some of her supporters wore black T-shirts and yellow masks and one held a yellow umbrella, a symbol of protests in the former British colony dating back to 2014.
Chow, along with Wong and Nathan Law, who has since been given asylum in Britain, came to prominence as teenage activists during the 2014 protests to demand universal suffrage.

FASTFACTS

• Agnes Chow was also arrested last year on suspicion of ‘colluding with foreign forces’ under the security law but has not faced any charges related to that.

• Fluent in Japanese, Chow has a sizable following in Japan, particularly on social media and had traveled to the country frequently before her arrest.

The three founded the democracy group Demosisto in 2016, which dissolved hours after Beijing passed a contentious national security law for the city last year amid fears it could be targeted under the legislation.
The law has stifled the pro-democracy movement and raised concern about prospects for the autonomy Hong Kong was promised under a “one country, two systems” formula when it was handed over to China in 1997.
Chow was also arrested last year on suspicion of “colluding with foreign forces” under the security law but has not faced any charges related to that.
Fluent in Japanese, Chow has a sizable following in Japan, particularly on social media and had traveled to the country frequently before her arrest. She often posted on Twitter in Japanese.


Pakistan steps up vaccine rollout with 100m target

Pakistan steps up vaccine rollout with 100m target
Government employees wait their turn to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in Peshawar. (AP)
Updated 13 June 2021

Pakistan steps up vaccine rollout with 100m target

Pakistan steps up vaccine rollout with 100m target
  • Health authorities budget $1.1bn for Pfizer, Sinovac and AstraZeneca jabs

LAHORE: Pakistan has received 14.5 million coronavirus vaccine doses since it began its vaccination campaign in February, and plans to buy a further 90 million doses to inoculate the adult population in the second half of the year, the country’s health ministry has said.

Announcing its 2020-21 federal budget, Pakistani Minister of Finance Shaukat Tarin said that the government has allocated $1.1 billion to buy coronavirus vaccines and plans to vaccinate 100 million people out of the country’s 216 million population by July 2022.
It has also set aside 100 billion Pakistani rupees ($641 million) to combat coronavirus in the next fiscal year.
According to data shared with Arab News by health chief Dr. Faisal Sultan, as of June 9, the country had received 14.5 million vaccine doses, of which 11.06 million had been bought from pharmaceutical companies, 2.7 million donated by China and a consignment of 1.34 million contributed by Covax, the global dose-sharing platform for poorer countries.
Last November, Pakistan’s government allocated $150 million to buy COVID-19 vaccines from international manufacturers. The fund has been used to buy 11.06 million doses as well as pay transportation costs and buy the equipment needed to administer vaccines across the country, according to Dr. Rana Muhammad Safdar, director-general of health in Islamabad.

HIGHLIGHTS

• As of June 8, about 9.9 million doses of the 14.5 million total doses received had been administered, according to data provided by the health chief.

• According to a government portal, 3.6 percent of Pakistan’s 70 million adult population has been fully inoculated so far.

As of June 8, about 9.9 million doses of the 14.5 million total doses received had been administered, according to data provided by the health chief. According to a government portal, 3.6 percent of Pakistan’s 70 million adult population has been fully inoculated so far.
Of the doses administered, most people — 3,513,088 — have received a Sinovac jab, Sultan said, adding that 2,548,788 people have been given the Sinopharm vaccine.
There are 1,876 vaccination centers in the country, which the government aims to increase to 4,000.
Islamabad, Pakistan’s capital, has vaccinated the highest number of eligible individuals — 320,000 — or 27 percent of the city’s adult population.
Most of those vaccinated in Pakistan have been men, data showed, with the ratio of men to women receiving vaccinations being 60:40.
The country has already placed orders for an additional 90 million doses of the vaccine, the health chief added.
He said that authorities expected to receive 34 million doses of the Sinovac vaccine later this year, including 4 million in June, and a further 5 million doses each month until December.
Pakistan is also securing 18 million doses of the China-produced CanSino vaccine, which includes delivery of 3 million doses of the drug every month from July to December.
The US Pfizer vaccine will be administered across the country as well, with 1 million arriving in July and 11 million between July and  December, totaling 12 million doses.
Separately, Pakistan will receive another 1.23 million dose delivery of the UK-produced AstraZeneca jab this month, donated through the Covax platform.
However, the government has voiced concern at people failing to show up to receive a second jab.
“About one in five people fail to have their second dose,” Sultan said.
But Safdar said that the missed appointments might be the result of a backlog in late May, and that “people are now turning up, including those who missed their dose.”


Pro Palestinian rally in London calls on UK government to impose Israel sanction

Pro Palestinian rally in London calls on UK government to impose Israel sanction
Updated 12 June 2021

Pro Palestinian rally in London calls on UK government to impose Israel sanction

Pro Palestinian rally in London calls on UK government to impose Israel sanction
  • Groups say 8,000 attended protests, with 185,000 writing to MPs ahead of debate

LONDON: Pro Palestinian protesters gathered outside Downing Street in the British capital, London, on Saturday to call on the UK government to impose sanctions on Israel over its bombardment of the Gaza Strip last month.
The demonstration comes two days before Parliament is set to debate a petition to introduce sanctions against Israel, after it received more than 380,000 signatures, above the 100,000 threshold required for it to be considered.
The protest, which also comes on the eve of a G7 meeting of world leaders in Cornwall, is part of the “Resist G7 Day of Action for International Justice”organized by a coalition of groups calling on the G7 nations to “end all military-security cooperation with Israel, and employ targeted sanctions until Israel complies with international law,” the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC) said.
Organizers said over 8,000 people attended the protest, and 185,000 people directly contacted MPs to “pressure the UK government to hold Israel accountable for repeatedly violating International law, via the imposition of sanctions.”

Organizers say over 8,000 people attended the protest in central London calling on the the British government to introduce sanctions on Israel. (FOA)

Moreover, 10,000 people requested a meeting with their MPs on Wednesday to ask them to attend the parliamentary debate on Monday and speak in favor of sanctions on Israel, as part of a national lobby organized by UK-based NGO Friends of Al-Asqa (FOA).
“Over a space of 10 days, 185,000 people sent a letter that we were organizing through our website on the back of Shiekh Jarrah and what was happening at Al-Aqsa Mosque to ask for a call of sanctions,” FOA’s Shamiul Joarder told Arab News.
Israel’s 11-day campaign in Gaza followed heightened tensions in the West Bank, after Israeli security forces stormed the Al-Aqsa Mosque several times during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and wounded hundreds of worshippers, while in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood in Jerusalem, dozens of Palestinians face evictions from their homes.
“Israel violates over 40 UN resolutions; the campaign to impose sanctions will continue until Israel is held to account for failing to abide by international law,” said Joarder.
He added that what they have found over the years is more people are becoming politically aware, astute and literate, and are more understanding of the political dynamics in the region.

“Social media has really helped to see what is happening on the ground, to help see on your phone the apartheid taking place in Palestine, and that has really allowed people to galvanize and understand that us giving money is not the solution here, we need to become politically active,” he said.
“Even though the bombs have stopped in Gaza, the occupation remains, and it is really welcoming and a blessing that so many people are still engaged, which is a slight difference to 2008 and 2014. I feel as though people really understand that just because there is a cease-fire, it does not mean the occupation has ceased, it does not mean the apartheid has finished, or the settlements have finished, or the colonial project has come to an end. People understand that the occupation remains and they need to continue to campaign.”
The FOA and PSC organized the protest along with Stop the War Coalition, Palestinian Forum in Britain, and the Muslim Association of Britain.