Saudi Arabia wants to see ‘verifiable deeds’ from talks with Iran, says official

Update Ambassador Rayed Krimly, head of policy planning at the Saudi foreign ministry.
Ambassador Rayed Krimly, head of policy planning at the Saudi foreign ministry.
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Updated 08 May 2021

Saudi Arabia wants to see ‘verifiable deeds’ from talks with Iran, says official

Saudi Arabia wants to see ‘verifiable deeds’ from talks with Iran, says official
  • Talks ‘intensify’ on Iranian nuclear crisis
  • Minister said Saudi policy had been explained “very clearly” by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman

JEDDAH: A Saudi Foreign Ministry official said on Friday that talks between the Kingdom and Iran aim to reduce regional tensions, but added it was too early to judge the outcome and Riyadh wanted to see “verifiable deeds.”

The comments by Ambassador Rayed Krimly, head of policy planning at the ministry, were the first public confirmation that the rivals — who severed ties in 2016 — were holding direct talks.

“As to current Saudi-Iranian talks they aim to explore ways to reduce tensions in the region,” Krimly told Reuters. 

“We hope they prove successful, but it is too early, and premature, to reach any definitive conclusions. Our evaluation will be based on verifiable deeds, and not proclamations.”

Regional officials and sources told Reuters that the discussions were focused on Yemen and the 2015 nuclear deal between global powers and Iran, which Riyadh had opposed.

Iraq’s president said on Wednesday that Baghdad hosted more than one round of talks between Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Krimly said Saudi policy had been explained “very clearly” by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who last month said that while the Sunni  Kingdom has a problem with Tehran’s “negative behavior” it wanted good relations with Shiite Iran.

Krimly said recent media reports that the head of Saudi intelligence had held talks in Damascus were inaccurate. 

He said Saudi policy toward Syria remained based on support for the Syrian people, for a political solution under a UN umbrella and in accordance with Security Council resolutions, and for the unity and Arab identity of Syria.


Yemen war

Tensions between Riyadh and Tehran have festered over the Yemen war, where an Iran-aligned Houthi group has increased attacks on Saudi Arabia. Strains between the two Gulf powerhouses also grew after a 2019 assault on Saudi oil plants that Riyadh blamed on Iran, a charge Tehran denies.

Riyadh supported former US President Donald Trump’s decision in 2018 to quit the nuclear pact for not addressing Tehran’s missiles program and regional behavior. After Trump re-imposed sanctions on Iran, Tehran responded by breaching several nuclear restrictions.

Global powers are trying at talks in Vienna to bring the United States and Iran back into full compliance with the deal. Saudi Arabia has urged them to reach a stronger accord.

The talks began in Austria in early April. Russian delegate Mikhail Ulyanov tweeted following Friday’s meeting that “the participants agreed on the need to intensify the process.” The delegations seem to be ready to stay in Vienna as long as necessary to achieve the goal, he wrote.

Riyadh and Tehran have also backed opposing sides in Lebanon and Syria, where Iran has supported President Bashar Assad.

Gulf states have been alarmed by the rising influence of non-Arab Iran, Russia and Turkey in Syria, especially after Syria’s membership of the Arab League was suspended in 2011 over its crackdown on protesters at the start of the civil war.

The US pulled out of the landmark 2015 deal in 2018 after then-President Donald Trump said the pact needed to be renegotiated.

US President Joe Biden says he wants to rejoin the deal, but that Iran needs to return to compliance.

On Friday, Biden said he believed the Iranians were approaching the talks seriously, the AP reported

“But how serious and what they’re prepared to do is a different story,” Biden said. “We’re still talking.”