Foundation stone laid for $880m Chinese LED project in Saudi Arabia's Jubail

Foundation stone laid for $880m Chinese LED project in Saudi Arabia's Jubail
Jubail Industrial City and others overseen by the Royal Commission produce 6 percent of the world’s petrochemicals. (Supplied)
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Updated 03 July 2021

Foundation stone laid for $880m Chinese LED project in Saudi Arabia's Jubail

Foundation stone laid for $880m Chinese LED project in Saudi Arabia's Jubail
  • New factory is expected to create 4,000 jobs
  • SABIC to provide project with raw materials

RIYADH: Chairman of the Royal Commission for Jubail and Yanbu, Abdullah Al-Saadan, laid the foundation stone for a SR3.3 billion ($879.8 million) factory to produce LED lighting lamps in the in Blaskim area in Jubail 2.

The factory for China’s Shengkong International Company for Industry is expected to create more than 4,000 jobs, SPA reported.

The project has come together thanks to the collaboration between the Royal Commission and partners from Saudi Aramco, SABIC, Saudi Silk Road Company and China, Al-Saadan said.

Jubail Industrial City and the other Royal Commission cities represent 6 percent of petrochemical production worldwide, he said.

SABIC and Shengkong International signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MoC) to supply the project with the necessary raw materials, while the Saudi Silk Road Company for Industrial Services and CPC Company will produce plastic materials for medical use.


PIF-backed Soudah Development to plant more than 1 million trees in Soudah, parts of Rijal Almaa

PIF-backed Soudah Development to plant more than 1 million trees in Soudah, parts of Rijal Almaa
Updated 5 sec ago

PIF-backed Soudah Development to plant more than 1 million trees in Soudah, parts of Rijal Almaa

PIF-backed Soudah Development to plant more than 1 million trees in Soudah, parts of Rijal Almaa

RIYADH: Soudah Development, a Public Investment Fund company, on Saturday announced a new environmental initiative to plant more than 1 million trees across Soudah and parts of Rijal Almaa by 2030.

It was announced at the Green Saudi Initiative Forum. The landmark project will support the Saudi Green Initiative, which aims to plant 10 billion trees, reduce carbon emissions by 4 percent, and raise protected areas to more than 30 percent of the Kingdom’s total land area.

Protecting and expanding vegetation cover is at the heart of Soudah Development’s sustainable development strategy to transform Soudah and parts of Rijal Almaa into a luxury mountain tourism destination set atop Saudi Arabia’s highest peak. 

Deploying best-in-class irrigation techniques, the initiative to plant more than 1 million trees by 2030 will restore forests across a 627 square km area, boost natural environments, enhance ecological balance, and support the reintroduction of local species of flora and fauna.
Hussam Almadani, CEO of Soudah Development, said: “Investing in the country’s extraordinary natural resources has been a guiding principle since Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman launched Soudah Development. We have assembled some of the world’s foremost sustainability leaders to support our goals as we deliver a new era of sustainable luxury tourism in Saudi Arabia.”

He added: “We are extremely proud to announce our initiative to plant more than 1 million trees by 2030. It consolidates our efforts to promote world-class sustainable development and demonstrates the high standards we set for ourselves when it comes to promoting environmental leadership.”

By adopting global best practices, renewable energy and latest advanced technologies, Soudah Development is working to reduce water and electricity consumption, divert waste away from landfill and achieve carbon neutrality.

 


Royal Commission for AlUla aims to slash emissions by 270 metric tons annually

Royal Commission for AlUla aims to slash emissions by 270 metric tons annually
Updated 5 min 19 sec ago

Royal Commission for AlUla aims to slash emissions by 270 metric tons annually

Royal Commission for AlUla aims to slash emissions by 270 metric tons annually

RIYADH: The Royal Commission for AlUla aims to reduce carbon emissions by 270 metric tons annually by adopting a circular carbon economy approach, said the commission’s CEO Amr AlMadani on Saturday.

He was speaking at a session titled “Give to nature, Nature gives back: The business case for a circular economy” held on the sidelines of the Saudi Green Initiative Forum in Riyadh.

AlMadani said: “If we look today at AlUla the culture, oases and its current state demonstrate clearly why a circular carbon economy and sustainable practices are must do today for this oasis to revive. 

“We are committed through our masterplan to free the Oasis (AlUla) from the negative effects.” Almadani said.

He said the commission is already working on a solar and renewable energy complex, which would produce 500 MW in excess to support the growing power demand by 2035.  “We are also integrating with the national (power) grid to make sure that any generated excess energy that is sustainable (should) flow through the sustainable grid,” AlMadani said. 

The session was attended by Magdi Batato, executive vice president, head of operation, Nestle and Renat Heuberger, co-founder and CEO, South Pole. 

 


Sport is a key part of climate action, says Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud

Sport is a key part of climate action, says Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud
Updated 47 min 18 sec ago

Sport is a key part of climate action, says Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud

Sport is a key part of climate action, says Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud

RIYADH: Sport needs to be recognised as a key weapon in the fight against climate change, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the United States declared at the Saudi Green Initiative on Saturday.

Speaking in Riyadh, Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud said implementing the UN Sports for Climate Action Framework and supporting its signatories will promote sustainability.

“The principles of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change can educate, inform and inspire our conduct, and our behaviour, and it can make it clear that sports will help lead this battle,” she said, adding: “And as a member of the Saudi Olympic family and also representing the International Olympic Committee. I'm proud that the sporting world has this opportunity to confront the climate crisis.”

The ambassador went on to argue that climate change can only be tackled if millions of young people around the world are mobilized to take care not just of themselves, but the environment around them.

 “And that's what sports has always done, and at no time has that leadership been more important than now as we look to protect the future generations and protect our planet,” she said.  

The Kingdom is signing the sports framework with the United Nations.

Princess Reema believes the world can be impacted by sports, saying: “Sports are a reflection of what we value: excellence, friendship, respect. It can be transforming and sports can educate and inform.”

“When I think of sports. I think of a community. I think of people striving, reaching for long sought dreams and sports will always bring us together. It will always challenge us to be our best,” she added.


SGI: Youth will play a big role in Saudi Arabia's environmental agenda

SGI: Youth will play a big role in Saudi Arabia's environmental agenda
Updated 23 October 2021

SGI: Youth will play a big role in Saudi Arabia's environmental agenda

SGI: Youth will play a big role in Saudi Arabia's environmental agenda
  • "It is your generation that must make us be accountable," says UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres

DUBAI/JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia is in full gear to host the upcoming Saudi Green Initiative in Riyadh — a much awaited event that will set out the Kingdom’s ambitious environmental agenda. 

But the event is not only going to cover Saudi efforts to fight climate change, but also rally the wider Middle East region to comply with international targets, including limiting global warming to below 2 degrees compared to pre-industrial levels. 

Experts all over the world have emphasized the role of collaboration to achieve this, with Saudi Arabia demonstrating it with its remarkable hosting of the G20 summit last year — at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The efforts are not only coming from governments though — one of the most reported environmental campaigns is coming from young people, which the UN said is just logical given they are the inheritors of the Earth.

“My generation has largely failed until now to preserve both justice in the world and to preserve the planet. It is your generation that must make us be accountable to make sure that we don't betray the future of humankind,” UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres previously said in a statement. 

This will be reflected in the upcoming SGI, where a parallel event that focuses on youth participation in the regional and global environmental agenda will be held.

The Youth Green Summit, happening on October 24, is “a platform for environmental literacy, advocacy, and policy making,” according to the SGI website. 

It will feature interactive workshops and collaborative climate policy activities, as well as panels with leading youth activists. 

Saudi Arabia has a massive young population — almost 51 percent of the Kingdom is below 25 years old, and the government has been empowering them to contribute to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s “Vision 2030” to improve the quality of life in the Kingdom. 

A Saudi-based founder of a local environmental initiative said including the youth in discussions about the environment is “what will provide effective results.”

“The future of national development in the Kingdom hinges on empowering its youthful majority,” Eshraq Al-Haddad told Arab News.

She added: “The Kingdom has already made tremendous efforts to empower youth through programs and projects of national transformation initiatives, increasing their participation in society and the labor market.”

Al-Haddad said many young Saudis have shown an increasing interest in environmental sustainability, and many are championing this cause through creating businesses or promoting environmental awareness through community activities or campaigns.

“In a recent development, Saudi youth have been profoundly involved in the lead up to the Saudi G20 Summit. Hence, youth have been the major beneficiaries of the chance for open dialogue and inclusive policy making,” she said.

The Saudi youth is “yearning for an active role to make a positive impact towards the environment,” Al-Hadded said, adding the “Saudi Green Initiative is a great step.”

A 23-year-old Saudi-based diver, Joud Hamshari, said she is “thrilled” for the upcoming Youth Green Summit.

“We scuba dive to explore the underwater and enjoy the scenery of marine life. As divers, it is our responsibility to preserve the aquatic environment, and it is good to have the support of SGI to sustain the effort we do as scuba divers,” she said.

Other divers like Hamshari have been involved in different activities to create awareness in their own communities, including annual clean-up drives. 

Fifteen-year-old Saudi Nour Binmahfouz said: “As divers, it is our obligation to preserve the aquatic environment and educate those who have neglected their duties. With the support of the Saudi Green initiative, us divers will be able to continue with our efforts in spreading awareness as pollution in the ocean has skyrocketed.”

The SGI Forum will take place on October 23, followed by the Youth Green Summit on the next day.

 


Prince Charles: Saudi Arabia has 'critical role' in fighting climate change

Prince Charles: Saudi Arabia has 'critical role' in fighting climate change
Updated 20 min 42 sec ago

Prince Charles: Saudi Arabia has 'critical role' in fighting climate change

Prince Charles: Saudi Arabia has 'critical role' in fighting climate change

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has a "critically important" role in diversifying the world's energy mix and tackling climate change, the UK's Prince Charles has insisted.

In a video played at the Saudi Green Initiative Forum in Riyadh, the Prince of Wales said the work in the Middle East to tackle climate change is providing hope that the world can experience a green recovery.

The Prince warned there is a “dangerously narrow window of opportunity” for nations to act, adding: “But, there is hope, and we are already seeing real progress — something the Saudi Green initiative and Middle East Green Initiative aim to accelerate.

"As I’ve been trying to stress for many years, the region has huge potential for renewable energy including solar power, wind, green hydrogen and carbon capture.

"These industries can drive economic growth and increase green job opportunities.

"Ladies and gentlemen, the Kingdom's global leadership in energy transition is critically important.

"I can only say that it is enormously encouraging to see the commitment to diversifying its emergency mix, recognizing the cascading economic and social environment benefits that renewable energy provides.

"Practical projects on the ground help bring to life the transformative potential of the green economy.

“Bearing in mind that the region is estimated to lose 13 billion dollars to dust storms every year, there is no doubt that the regional initiative to plant billions of trees would have a truly transformative effect for the benefit of generations to come.”