New decisions to create 40,000 jobs for Saudis

The ministry has issued a number of Saudization decisions since last year. (SPA)
The ministry has issued a number of Saudization decisions since last year. (SPA)
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Updated 05 July 2021

New decisions to create 40,000 jobs for Saudis

The ministry has issued a number of Saudization decisions since last year. (SPA)
  • Minister of Human Resources and Social Development Ahmed Al-Rajhi said the ministry’s plan for this year targeted providing more than 203,000 jobs

RIYADH: Ministerial decisions aimed at creating 40,000 jobs for nationals were announced on Sunday. The jobs will be in legal advice, law firms, customs clearance, real estate, the cinema sector, driving schools, and technical and engineering professions.
Minister of Human Resources and Social Development Ahmed Al-Rajhi said the ministry’s plan for this year targeted providing more than 203,000 jobs.
He added that these decisions were a continuation of the ministry’s strategy of enabling Saudis to obtain high-quality jobs and providing a stimulating work environment, contributing to more Saudis working in the private sector and increasing their participation in the labor market.
The ministry has issued a number of Saudization decisions since last year, including ones that target commercial complexes, the food and beverage industry, and education jobs in the public sector. These decisions aim to support establishments and job seekers according to organized mechanisms and set timetables while also boosting the localization of specific professions in vital sectors such as dentistry, pharmacy, engineering, and accounting.

They also aim to target and foster quality professions, leadership, supervisory and sustainable jobs that have a high rate of growth and development, as well as jobs that require high technical skills.

The decisions contribute to increasing the participation of nationals in the Saudi labor market and providing high-quality job opportunities for men and women.

 


German journalist acquitted of terror charges in Turkey

German journalist acquitted of terror charges in Turkey
Updated 24 min 33 sec ago

German journalist acquitted of terror charges in Turkey

German journalist acquitted of terror charges in Turkey
  • Mesale Tolu was accused of engaging in terror propaganda and being a member of a banned left-wing group
  • Reporters Without Borders ranks Turkey at 153 out of 180 countries in its World Press Freedom Index of 2021

ISTANBUL: A Turkish court has acquitted German journalist Mesale Tolu after years on trial for terror-related charges.
“After 4 years, 8 months and 20 days: Acquitted of both charges!” Tolu tweeted after her acquittal. She was accused of engaging in terror propaganda and being a member of a banned left-wing group — the Marxist-Leninist Communist Party.
Tolu, 38, was placed in pre-trial detention for eight months in 2017. She was later released but was barred from leaving Turkey until August 2018. She lives in Germany.
Before her arrest, Tolu worked as a translator and journalist for the Turkish ETHA news agency.
German-Turkish relations were tense at the time of Tolu’s arrest, when eight other German or German-Turkish citizens were imprisoned. Berlin considered the arrests to be politically motivated.
Reporters Without Borders ranks Turkey at 153 out of 180 countries in its World Press Freedom Index of 2021. At least 34 media employees are currently behind bars, according to Turkey’s Journalists Union.


Visitors swarm Saudi Arabia’s Jazan Honey Festival

Around 3,500 kilograms of honey were sold at last year’s festival with a total value of more than SR2 million. The event aims to support local beekeepers. (SPA)
Around 3,500 kilograms of honey were sold at last year’s festival with a total value of more than SR2 million. The event aims to support local beekeepers. (SPA)
Updated 31 min 51 sec ago

Visitors swarm Saudi Arabia’s Jazan Honey Festival

Around 3,500 kilograms of honey were sold at last year’s festival with a total value of more than SR2 million. The event aims to support local beekeepers. (SPA)
  • Event showcases the region’s tourism, economic, and investment components

JEDDAH: The seventh Jazan Honey Festival is attracting more fans in the region’s Edabi governorate, where the event is held annually.

The festival was recently launched by Jazan Gov. Prince Mohammed bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz. He was briefed upon his arrival about the festival’s activities and the accompanying events.
Local resident Dr. Mohammed Al-Ghazwani said the festival sought to introduce and showcase the region’s various agricultural, tourism, economic, and investment components, including honey.
He added that the festival, where 50 beekeepers were displaying various types of first-class natural honey, also aimed to support local beekeepers and that it had helped apiarists to invest in the region’s fertile environment to produce commercial quantities.
“The festival also helps Jazan’s honey farmers to develop packaging methods for their honey products, in light of the support and care given by the wise leadership aiming to develop the country and serve citizens and improve their well-being,” Al-Ghazwani said in a speech on behalf of locals. “Over 700 kilograms of honey have so far been sold over the last three days of the festival, worth more than SR250,000 (around $67,000).”
Around 3,500 kilograms of honey were sold at last year’s festival with a total value of more than SR2 million.

HIGHLIGHT

The festival was recently launched by Jazan Gov. Prince Mohammed bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz. He was briefed upon his arrival about the festival’s activities and the accompanying events.

A local visitor to the festival, Mohammed Hassan Hakami, told Arab News that the region could produce different types of honey including sidr, which was a well-liked and popular variety in the Kingdom.
“In the region, we also have other honey types, such as Al-Qatad, Al-Majra, Al-Samrah, and Al-Shawkah. We also have different types of fine beeswax,” Hakami said.
He bought 2 kilograms of sidr tree honey and expressed his confidence that the festival’s organizers would not allow low-quality honey to be put on sale.
Honeybee expert Faiz Al-Quthami said that Salam honey could not be produced anywhere else but Jazan.
“Jazan is the best region for producing bees, honey, and beeswax. The region also has mangrove honey, which is higher in medicinal and nutritional value than any other type of honey. However, many beekeepers pay less attention to this type of honey,” he said.
Al-Quthami said that some types of honey were more expensive than others simply because of the shortage of the produced quantities.
He said that Majra honey, for example, was produced in small batches due to its short season but that this factor justified its high prices when compared to those of sidr tree honey.
“Sidr honey is very popular in Saudi Arabia for its fine quality, availability, and reasonable price. Based on scientific research and studies, however, Al-Samar honey is the second-best honey after that of the mangrove shrubs.”


Michigan city council becomes first all-Muslim led government in US

Amer Ghalib, Hamtramck mayor, leads alongside a majority Arab-American city council. (Screenshot/AN Photo)
Amer Ghalib, Hamtramck mayor, leads alongside a majority Arab-American city council. (Screenshot/AN Photo)
Updated 44 min 8 sec ago

Michigan city council becomes first all-Muslim led government in US

Amer Ghalib, Hamtramck mayor, leads alongside a majority Arab-American city council. (Screenshot/AN Photo)
  • Yemeni-born mayor leads Hamtramck alongside elected city council which is made up almost entirely of Arab immigrants

HAMTRAMCK, Michigan: Hamtramck, Michigan is the first city in the US to be led by an all-Muslim government.

A city of mostly Polish-Americans for 99 years, locals say the population has gradually shifted to now be over half Arab-Americans. And in its 100th year, the city’s leaders reflect that change. 

“It was a historic achievement that’s never happened before for the Arabs and immigrants,” Amer Ghalib, Hamtramck mayor, told Arab News.

“And I think it inspired many of the youth to go for this field and made them confident in themselves and of their abilities and that they have become an inseparable part of the fabric of this society,” he added.

The Yemeni-born mayor leads Hamtramck alongside the elected city council which, with the exception of one American-born convert to Islam, is made up entirely of Arab immigrants.

Having moved when he was 17, Ghalib considers the two square miles that make up Hamtramck to be his mother city.

“I feel proud and I feel a big responsibility and this is why we have to work very hard to prove that we, as immigrants, can work and succeed in managerial, public service, and political fields in this country,” he said.

Preempting any Islamaphobic backlash or fear, Ghalib assured citizens that they should not expect any changes from an all-Muslim city government, just efforts to revitalize city infrastructure and a commitment to serve its people. 

“There is no difference, because we are all bound by the city regulations and the country’s constitution, with laws and regulations that we cannot violate,” he said.

“All religions promote virtue and our noble Islam promotes doing good and abandoning evil and respecting others and treating them well.”


Nadal, Barty impress but Djokovic looms over Australian Open

Nadal, Barty impress but Djokovic looms over Australian Open
Updated 51 min 53 sec ago

Nadal, Barty impress but Djokovic looms over Australian Open

Nadal, Barty impress but Djokovic looms over Australian Open
  • Osaka successfully opens title defense but Gauff an early big-name casualty

MELBOURNE: Rafael Nadal and Ashleigh Barty made devastating starts to their Australian Open title campaigns on Monday as the Grand Slam attempted to move on from the Novak Djokovic visa saga.

Naomi Osaka launched the defense of her women’s crown with victory but Coco Gauff was an early big-name casualty. The American 17-year-old dumped out in straight sets by Wang Qiang, who is ranked outside the top 100.

The only Australian Open champion in the men’s draw after nine-time winner Djokovic’s deportation, Nadal started his quest to become the first male to win 21 Grand Slams by sweeping aside 66th-ranked Marcos Giron, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2.

The draw has opened up for the Spanish great with defending champion Djokovic out of the picture and the other member of the “Big Three,”  Roger Federer, not at Melbourne Park because of injury.

But the 35-year-old Nadal said he was just relieved to be playing tennis after Djokovic’s refusal to get vaccinated against COVID overshadowed the first Grand Slam of the year right up until the last moment.

Although Djokovic’s absence is good news for Nadal’s tilt at men’s tennis history, he said he would rather the world No. 1 from Serbia was playing.

“The ideal situation in the world of sport is that the best players are on court,” said Nadal, who plays Germany’s Yannick Hanfmann in the second round.

He may not be there, but Djokovic still looms over the tournament.

Nadal was all guns blazing at Rod Laver Arena, showing no apparent ill effects from a foot injury he suffered last year and then being “very sick” with COVID in December.

“Today is one victory in the first Grand Slam. Happy for that. One month ago situation had been different — looks very ugly in some way,” he said.

Other winners in the men’s draw on day one of the so-called “Happy Slam,” where crowds have been capped at 50 percent because of the pandemic, included seventh seed Matteo Berrettini.

The Italian defeated American Brandon Nakashima in four sets despite tummy trouble.

Also through was third seed Alexander Zverev in the night match, but 12th-seeded Briton Cameron Norrie lost in three sets to Sebastian Korda, the son of 1998 Australian Open champion Petr Korda.

There was to be no fairytale run for “lucky loser” Salvatore Caruso.

The Italian had earned a place in the main draw when Djokovic was deported but he fell at the first hurdle.

In the women’s draw, top seed and world No.1 Barty made a real statement of intent, crushing qualifier Lesia Tsurenko in 54 minutes, 6-0, 6-1.

The 25-year-old faces Lucia Bronzetti of Italy next as the pre-tournament favorite and home hope chases a maiden Australian Open title.

“There’s always something special about playing on a Monday night in the Australian Open,” said Barty, who will need to deal with high expectations from the home fans.

Japan’s former world No. 1 Osaka, the reigning champion, was also largely untroubled with a 6-3, 6-3 win against Colombia’s Camila Osorio.

Seeded 13 after a disrupted 2021 in which she said she had suffered “long bouts of depression,”  Osaka cruised through in 68 minutes.

“I would say I feel more comfortable in my skin, if that makes sense,” said the 24-year-old, who won the title at Melbourne Park in 2019 and 2021. She will play American Madison Brengle next.

Also through are French Open champion Barbora Krejcikova, Greek fifth seed Maria Sakkari and reigning Olympic champion Belinda Bencic.

But there was heartbreak for Tunisian ninth seed Ons Jabeur, who did not even make it onto court and withdrew because of injury before her match.

Also out was the 18th-seeded prodigy Gauff, surprisingly losing 6-4, 6-2 to China’s Wang.

“I think just everything disappointed me about today,” said Gauff.

“I feel like in the pre-season, I worked really hard, and I felt like I was ready to have a good run here.

“Today I just didn’t perform well.”


Saudi law of elderly is based on country’s customs and traditions

Saad Al-Hammad, the spokesperson for the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Development. (Supplied)
Saad Al-Hammad, the spokesperson for the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Development. (Supplied)
Updated 33 min 54 sec ago

Saudi law of elderly is based on country’s customs and traditions

Saad Al-Hammad, the spokesperson for the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Development. (Supplied)
  • Legislation will give the elderly ‘priority in services and investing their skills in a variety of fields’

RIYADH: It is important to ensure social protection for elderly people — be it quality of life, providing assistance, or investing their skills in various fields. Society, however, must know that these rights are part of Saudi Arabia’s social norms and traditions.

The Saudi Cabinet approved a new law to protect the rights of elderly citizens in the Kingdom earlier this month.
Saad Al-Hammad, the spokesperson for the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Development, said: “The new law strengthens the position of the elderly in society and is based on our customs and traditions, by giving the elderly priority in services and waiting areas and investing their skills in a variety of fields.”
This legislation, says Al-Hammad, grants the elderly special privileges and preserves their social, financial, and legal rights. It also sets harsh penalties, such as fines and imprisonment, for those who abuse the elderly, be they elderly individuals themselves or the private and government institutions that provide services to them.

HIGHLIGHT

This legislation, according to official, grants the elderly special privileges and preserves their social, financial, and legal rights.

He noted that the elderly have the right to choose to live with their families, and that sheltering in care homes depends on the situation of the elderly and what serves the public interest.

According to a UN report, those aged 65 and over made up around 3.4 percent of Saudi Arabia’s population. (Supplied)

“National centers are part of the transformation work in the elderly services, with the goal of achieving well-being and social integration for them, improving their status, and assisting families in providing care services for those who need them,” Al-Hammad explained.
According to Article 8 of the law, if a provider is unable to support the elderly financially, and no one in the elderly’s family can support them either, the ministry shall support them financially, according to what is specified by the regulation.
The ministry is obligated to enable the elderly to live in an environment that preserves their rights and dignity, and spreads awareness to clarify their rights. The ministry is also responsible for providing reliable statistical data about the elderly, which will benefit researchers in conducting studies and research.
The law also requires the ministry to organize and implement appropriate programs for the elderly, improve their skills, experiences, and hobbies, enhance their integration into society, encourage able-bodied elderly people to work, support their employers and promote volunteering activities serving the elderly.
The ministry must rehabilitate public and commercial facilities, residential neighborhoods, the surrounding environment, and mosques to ensure they are suitable for the needs of the elderly. They must also allocate places for the elderly in public facilities and at public events and urge the private sector, business owners, and civil bodies to care for them.
Government agencies should prioritize the elderly seeking basic services, particularly health and social services.
The ministry must also grant the elderly a privilege card that allows them to benefit from the public services to meet the necessities of their daily lives.
According to a UN report, those aged 65 and over made up around 3.4 percent of Saudi Arabia’s population, a figure it predicted could reach 6 percent by 2030.
Eng. Badr Al-Eyada, chairman of the board of directors of the Saudi Elderly Support Organization, stressed that it conducted a study on the situation of elderly care and launched a guide to services for the elderly. The guide presents services and facilities provided by the governmental, private, and civil sectors in 13 regions of the Kingdom.
Al-Eyada said his organization established and operated the first telephone consultation unit for the elderly in the Kingdom, which reflects its dedication to programs to facilitate telephone consultations for the medical, psychological, social, and legal needs of elderly people across the Kingdom.
He added that the approved law would provide the elderly with the care, attention, and protection they deserve, and helps ensure social security for the elderly, whilst significantly raising awareness of this group’s rights.