British-Moroccan catwalker Nora Attal joins models on Dior runway in Paris

British-Moroccan catwalker Nora Attal joins models on Dior runway in Paris
Dior hosted two live shows. (AFP)
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Updated 06 July 2021

British-Moroccan catwalker Nora Attal joins models on Dior runway in Paris

British-Moroccan catwalker Nora Attal joins models on Dior runway in Paris

DUBAI: Dior ventured back into the real world Monday after more than a year away, with an in-person show for its Fall/Winter 2021-22 Haute Couture collection in Paris.

Moroccan-British catwalk star Nora Attal was among the models who walked the runway for the French luxury fashion house.  

The 22-year-old fashion star stomped down the runway wearing a feminine flowy mustard-yellow dress with a deep neckline. 




Attal stomped down the runway wearing a feminine flowy mustard-yellow dress with a deep neckline. (AFP)

Other models wore modernized versions of the house’s iconic Bar jacket paired with pleated wraparound skirts and tailored trousers. Outerwear was a major theme, such as a cashmere coat with patchwork embroidery. For evening, models wore ethereal long silk plissé dresses in soft shades of yellow, plaster, or Dior gray.

Attal, who made her runway debut in 2017, is a catwalk fixture at the house of Dior. She has walked in plenty of shows for the Parisian maison, including the Fall 2021 ready-to-wear, spring 2019 couture, spring 2018 ready-to-wear, and Fall 2018 couture shows.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dior Official (@dior)

Most fashion houses opted to continue with digital shows and presentations as the couture season got under way, but Dior hosted two live shows.

In a way, it felt like an earlier time, before anyone had ever used the term “social distancing” or wore a surgical mask with Louboutin heels.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dior Official (@dior)

The shows took place at Dior’s favorite venue, a temporary structure in the garden of the Musée Rodin. Street photographers jostled one another outside the front gate, while invited photographers massed at the photo call within. 

Guests greeted one another with air kisses. Several international accents were proof of a return to overseas travel. There were stars like US actresses Jessica Chastain and Jennifer Lawrence, Italian actress Monica Bellucci, British model Cara Delevingne and many more.


Lebanese director Mounia Akl’s silver-screen success story

Lebanese director Mounia Akl  has been praised by critics for her debut feature film. (Supplied)
Lebanese director Mounia Akl has been praised by critics for her debut feature film. (Supplied)
Updated 32 sec ago

Lebanese director Mounia Akl’s silver-screen success story

Lebanese director Mounia Akl  has been praised by critics for her debut feature film. (Supplied)

CAIRO: “Why am I obsessed with trash?” asks Mounia Akl with a laugh. “Actually, it’s funny because I have been called ‘the trash director’ by friends. But I think ‘Submarine,’ for me, was a stepping stone to ‘Costa Brava.’ So it’s not like I’ve been obsessed with trash all my life. It’s just that ‘Submarine’ was a fragment of ‘Costa Brava’ in many ways.”

The Lebanese director is sitting quietly in a corner of the TU Berlin Campus El Gouna, patiently discussing her debut feature, “Costa Brava, Lebanon.” At the film’s core is Lebanon’s trash crisis — a toxic and tragic disaster that has laid bare the fissures in Lebanese society. It’s a topic Akl knows only too well, having covered similar ground in her award-winning short, “Submarine,” and protested during the country’s 2015 trash crisis.   

“It was the first time that I felt like I belonged to a movement, because that movement was leaderless in a way,” says Akl of the protests. “I grew up after the civil war in a country where you only matter when you’re following a certain person or a certain political party. And I don’t. I never felt like I belonged to that world. At the time of the garbage crisis I remember it felt like the streets belonged to my generation. The crisis also felt like it was a great metaphor for everything that was wrong about the country. It was not just an environmental disaster that transformed our city. It was all linked to political corruption.”

Into this world of activism Akl has thrown her fascination with family. In “Costa Brava,” that family consists of former political activists Walid (Saleh Bakri) and Souraya (Nadine Labaki) and their children Tala (Nadia Charbel) and Rim (Geana and Ceana Restom). Together they live a life of splendid isolation in the mountains overlooking Beirut, having escaped the city’s toxic pollution to enjoy an eco-conscious, self-sufficient existence. Living with this quirky, free-spirited family is Walid’s ageing mother, Zeina (Liliane Chacar Khoury). 

However, their utopian dreams are shattered when the construction of an illegal landfill site on a hill bordering their property brings the country’s trash crisis to their doorstep. It is an act of environmental vandalism that will soon cause familial fault lines to appear.   

“I’ve always been obsessed with family and how, by observing the structure of a family, you can understand the cracks in a society,” says Akl, who co-wrote the film with Clara Roquet. “Growing up, I always thought that it was because of Lebanon that my parents were fighting. I was convinced that there was a relationship between the outside pressure that they felt and the fact that my parents had moments of vulnerability. So I wanted to make a movie about that friction. About how outside pressure in Lebanon leads to people not having the time to exist or to take care of themselves, which brings out our own demons because we’re always in a state of crisis.”

Filmed over 36 days in November and December last year and produced by Abbout Productions, “Costa Brava” had its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival in September and won the NETPAC Prize at the Toronto International Film Festival soon after. It would go on to pick up the audience award at the BFI London Film Festival, but it was arguably in Egypt that the film began to gather serious momentum. The movie not only won the FIPRESCI Award for Best Debut Film at the El Gouna Film Festival earlier this month, but the inaugural El Gouna Green Star Award for sustainability. In doing so, it catapulted Akl and the film’s young stars into the regional spotlight.  

“It’s been a very heartwarming few months because I feel like we’ve been receiving a lot of open-hearted reactions from audiences,” says Akl, who cast her close friend, Yumna Marwan, as Walid’s sister Alia. “Being in London was quite emotional for me because not only was the room filled with an international audience that was very moved by the film, but also a lot of Lebanese expats who felt they really related to some of the struggles that the characters go through. And that’s something that has been very heartwarming — seeing how different people, whether in Venice, London, Toronto, or here in Egypt, react to the film. Because I feel that in each country people relate to a different character for different reasons.”

Much of the film’s success lies in its intimate portrayal of a family in crisis, but also in its two youngest and brightest stars. When Akl walked on stage to collect the first of the film’s two awards at El Gouna with Marwan and producer Myriam Sassine, it was the Restom sisters who stole the show. Seemingly unfazed by the cinematic spotlight, the twins were a highlight of the festival, with their charismatic and captivating portrayal of Rim (they took it in turns to play different scenes) integral to the film’s lovingly eccentric core.

“I remember seeing a video of this kid and I fell in love with her,” recalls Akl, who had already watched more than 100 other videos before casting the sisters. “Then the casting director told me there was another one and that they were twins. So I brought them both to the casting session thinking one of them would be Rim, but both of them were so great. Each of them had a trait of the character that the other didn’t. One of them was very emotional and hyper-empathetic and was like a 70-year-old person in a seven-year-old body. The other one was like this wild child Mowgli from ‘Jungle Book.’ So I divided the scenes between the two and it was a practical decision because one would get tired and we’d cast the other the next day.”

Filming was by no means easy. The August 4 explosion derailed the film’s production schedule and traumatized many in the crew, while the pandemic and the country’s deep economic crisis piled the challenges high. Such was Lebanon’s plight that the original idea of setting the film in a dystopian future was removed as reality caught up with the film’s production. In addition, green measures were implemented to create sustainability on set. That meant recycling, saving water and electricity, and reducing carbon emissions. It also meant utilizing special effects to create a landfill on an otherwise green mountainside. 

“I don’t think filmmakers should have messages in their films, but raise questions,” says Akl. “The most important thing for me is that some characters in this film are in agreement with each other that things need to change. That’s something that was important for me. Because when you believe you can change, then maybe there’s a bit of hope.”


E! People’s Choice Awards dedicates category to Mideast influencers

Lebanese influencer Karen Wazen is in the running for the award. (Getty Images)
Lebanese influencer Karen Wazen is in the running for the award. (Getty Images)
Updated 57 min 11 sec ago

E! People’s Choice Awards dedicates category to Mideast influencers

Lebanese influencer Karen Wazen is in the running for the award. (Getty Images)

DUBAI: US TV channel E! is hoping to engage Middle Eastern audience by dedicating a category of the upcoming E! People's Choice Awards to the Arab region.

For the first time, the E! People's Choice Awards has dedicated a category to the Middle East –  the Middle Eastern Social Media Star of 2021 – with eight contenders from the region in the running.

In the race to be crowned the Middle Eastern Social Media Star of 2021 are Syrian comedian and actor Amr Maskoun; Kuwaiti style icon and fashion influencer Ascia; Saudi Arabian fashion and style influencer Alanoud Badr, who goes by the online name Fozaza; Lebanese fashion guru and lifestyle influencer Karen Wazen; Emirati storyteller Khalid Al-Ameri; Egyptian Instagram sensation and beauty influencer Logina Salah; Iraqi YouTube sensation Noor Stars; and Bahraini filmmaker Omar Farooq.

"This last year has been game changing for creators — and in one of the toughest years of my career, it means the world to have been recognized and nominated,” Ascia said, according to a released statement.

For her part, Fozaza said: “It’s always a blessing and a reward in itself to be recognized and acknowledged for your passions, especially in the Middle East. I’m very grateful to be nominated for the People’s Choice Awards mainly because the people are the ones I do this for every day.”

"I’m so proud that there’s a category celebrating Middle Eastern voices. I’ve been such a fan of the People’s Choice Awards for years and to be nominated is already a win for me,” Wazen said, with Al-Ameri adding “since we started our journey of entertaining people on social media our goal has always been to build bridges between different parts of the world, to bring people closer together, and to show the world that there is more that makes us similar than makes us different. Just being recognized and nominated by the People’s Choice Awards on the other side of the world is an achievement in itself, and lets us know that we are on the right track, that our work is making a difference.”

The official voting window is from 27 October to 17 November. Fans can vote up to 25 times per day, per category on www.votepca.com/me.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Khalid Al Ameri (@khalidalameri)

 

 


Incomparable Cordoba — a cultural crossroads with unique history

Cordoba’s historic center is architecturally unique as it preserves, side by side, its complex Islamic, Christian, and Jewish past. (Supplied)
Cordoba’s historic center is architecturally unique as it preserves, side by side, its complex Islamic, Christian, and Jewish past. (Supplied)
Updated 28 October 2021

Incomparable Cordoba — a cultural crossroads with unique history

Cordoba’s historic center is architecturally unique as it preserves, side by side, its complex Islamic, Christian, and Jewish past. (Supplied)

CORDOBA: At a time when religious differences continue to divide, a visit to the Andalusian city of Cordoba is a refreshing history lesson, reminding us of what it means to live together in multicultural harmony. 

Cordoba’s historic center is architecturally unique as it preserves, side by side, its complex Islamic, Christian, and Jewish past. “Convivencia,” or coexistence in Spanish, is a term you’ll often hear in reference to medieval Spain, where Arabs ruled between 711 and 1492 CE. 

The Jewish Quarter. (Shutterstock)

Cordoba is a city that celebrates tolerance and knowledge. With its yellow buildings, narrow cobblestoned streets, and white walls clad with blue flowerpots, Cordoba’s historic center is a wonderful place for a holiday. 

The Hotel Maimonides — named after the Cordoba-born 12th-century Jewish philosopher — is a stone’s throw away from the city’s most-iconic monument, the Mosque-Cathedral. There will be hordes of tourists and street vendors attempting to sell you rosemary twigs, but it is worth the hassle. Built in the 8th century, this UNESCO World Heritage Site was first erected by Abd al-Rahman I, whose successors kept expanding it to accommodate the area’s growing population. At one point, it could fit in around 40,000 worshippers. Its concrete jungle of red and white, arching columns command attention, as does its sumptuous mihrab, decorated with golden mosaics.    

A statue of Maimonides. (Shutterstock)

When Catholic forces took over the city in 1236, they eventually built a gothic cathedral — also elegant in its own way — in the middle of the mosque. Nowhere else in the world does such a disorienting structure exist, which is why some believe the Mosque-Cathedral’s interior lacks visual harmony. While it’s free to enter the building’s spacious orange-tree courtyard, to enter the Mosque-Cathedral itself you’ll have to pay, but concessions apply for students, seniors and the disabled. The nighttime “Soul of Cordoba” tour is a great time to visit the Mosque-Cathedral. It is much quieter and breathtakingly beautiful with dimmed lighting. 

The nighttime “Soul of Cordoba” tour is a great time to visit the Mosque-Cathedral. (Shutterstock)

The Jewish Quarter, or ‘Juderia,’ is another historical point to explore. As you walk up Calle de los Judíos (Jewish Street), you will not only come across a well-known statue of Maimonides but one of just three remaining synagogues in all of Spain. Inside this 14th-century synagogue, which has a women’s gallery in the upper section, Hebrew inscriptions and geometric patterns cover the walls. In the past, the synagogue was also a hospital and kindergarten. 

The city is full of statues of luminaries associated with it, including the philosopher Averroes (Ibn Rushd) and oculist Al-Gafequi. If you have time, stop by the underground Baños del Alcazar Califal — an Arab bath house used by caliphs for socializing, pampering, and cleansing. 

Baños del Alcazar Califal. (Shutterstock)

Cordoba also has plenty of dining options. Casa Qurtubah is a lovely restaurant that cooks up Moroccan and Levantine dishes. For upbeat ambiance, go for La Chiquita de Quini. For cozy, try El Rincon de Carmen or Casa Palacio Bandolero for a quiet dinner. The restaurants’ popular patio spaces tend to get busy, so it’s wise to book in advance. Wherever you decide to go, the city’s simple and delicious staple of salmorejo, a thicker version of gazpacho soup, is a must-try.

A number of small and affordable museums are peppered around the city center. The Archaeology Museum, founded in the 19th century, sits on the site of an old Roman Theatre, the remains of which can still be found in the museum’s basement. The Museo Julio Romero de Torres is especially intimate with its deep red walls and sensual paintings of Spanish women. De Torres was born in Cordoba in 1874. He lived and died there, and his namesake museum was set up right next to his home. 

Elsewhere, over 20 years ago, Salma Al-Farouki founded Casa Andalusi, which educates visitors about Arabs’ long history of cultural contributions to Andalusia. Casa de Las Cabezas (House of Heads), meanwhile, is a charming museum — despite the gory myth of seven heads found hanging here — that demonstrates how an upper-class family would once have lived in this house and its multifunctional rooms. 

Finally, Museo Vivo de Al-Andalus recounts Cordoban histories through detailed miniature displays. The latter museum is connected to the Mosque-Cathedral area by the city’s long Roman Bridge. Crossing it, preferably around sunset, is an ideal way of ending the day, above the Guadalquivir River.


Candlestick breaks Sotheby’s record for sale of an ‘Islamic object’ at $9.1 million

The silver-inlaid brass candlestick, which was made in Northern Iraq circa 1275, soared to $9.1 million. (Supplied)
The silver-inlaid brass candlestick, which was made in Northern Iraq circa 1275, soared to $9.1 million. (Supplied)
Updated 28 October 2021

Candlestick breaks Sotheby’s record for sale of an ‘Islamic object’ at $9.1 million

The silver-inlaid brass candlestick, which was made in Northern Iraq circa 1275, soared to $9.1 million. (Supplied)

DUBAI: A 12th century candlestick has broken the record for an Islamic object at auction at Sotheby’s, following its sale as part of the Arts of the Islamic World & India auction this week.

The silver-inlaid brass candlestick, which was made in Northern Iraq circa 1275, soared to $9.1 million during a 25-bidding battle on Wednesday.

The silver-inlaid brass candlestick, which was made in Northern Iraq circa 1275, soared to $9.1 million. (Supplied)

The price represents a new record for an Islamic object at auction at the famed British auction house, beating the previous record for an Islamic object held by the “Debbane" Iznik Charger, which sold at Sotheby's for $6.9 million in 2018.

The auction house said the candlestick the finest example of Islamic metalwork to appear on the market in over ten years, adding that it has been in the same private collection since the 1960s and was recently exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The decorations on the object include a stately parade of courtiers and musicians  


Fashion turns heads at FII summit in Riyadh

Fashion turns heads at FII summit in Riyadh
Updated 28 October 2021

Fashion turns heads at FII summit in Riyadh

Fashion turns heads at FII summit in Riyadh

RIYADH: The coronavirus pandemic forced most organizers around the world to hold several key summits and events online thus depriving participants of the chance to meet others in person. 

High-profile events such as the Future Investment Initiative not only offer a platform to discuss global and regional issues but also provide an opportunity for the attendees to try to look their best. 

The pre-event to-do list not only includes finalizing keynote speeches or presentations but also the most suitable attire to don at the event.

Despite all the seriousness of the issues being discussed at this year’s FII, one cannot ignore the style and fashion tastes of the participants. Colorful abayas, suits, dresses, and special accessories tell stories of their own.

Colin Rhys, chief executive officer of KARAVAN, a nomadic hospitality brand looking to expand into the Kingdom, turned heads with his unique fedora with a piece of Shemagh (Saudi headgear) tied to it. 

He told Arab News that the idea of the hat came up five years ago in AlUla when the original black band that went around it broke off. “I was with a Saudi friend who tied this (Shemagh material) to the hat,” Rhys said.

“I wore it to every FII, every single event, every year, everywhere,” he said. “It has become a part of me.”

He added: “We’re really excited to be here at the FII. I think we see the huge opportunity that the Crown Prince has laid out for us, and we’re excited to be part of the journey moving toward (Vision) 2030.”

Asma Arkubi, Saudi client adviser at the Red Sea Development Co. said she saw some of the most beautiful abayas at the FII.

“I really liked how these women walked in with something cultural and extremely fashionable at the same time, it was like a mini fashion show for me,” she told Arab News.

“Combining modern chic designs with culture is something I’ve always been a fan of,” she added.

John Pagano, CEO of the Red Sea Development Co. and Amaala, said it is his third time attending the FII, and highlighted that attendees are eager to come back to in-person events.

“I think this is almost probably the best FII for a whole variety of reasons, not least because it's the first one after the pandemic and it just shows how much people want to come and meet face to face something we had been missing for over the last two years,” Pagano told Arab News.

“But I also think, and I’m really pleased of the fact that it’s really cemented Saudi Arabia’s reputation for the Future Investment Initiative. It is now a global event, and it’s attended by the brightest people in the world, and I’m pleased to be part of that,” he added.

Mimoun Assraoui, CEO of RIF Trust and vice-chairman of Latitude, who was also present at the FII, said: “I’m very happy to be here because I missed it last year. We did it virtually last year and this year I’m amazed by the contents, the people, and the high-level of experience, and seeing people happy again to connect with each other.”