King Abdulaziz Public Library acquires rare Islamic medical manuscripts

The illustrations, drawn with pen and inks of different colors, present the entire human body, with each drawing taking a whole page. (SPA)
The illustrations, drawn with pen and inks of different colors, present the entire human body, with each drawing taking a whole page. (SPA)
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Updated 15 September 2021

King Abdulaziz Public Library acquires rare Islamic medical manuscripts

The illustrations, drawn with pen and inks of different colors, present the entire human body, with each drawing taking a whole page. (SPA)
  • The drawings demonstrate great craftsmanship in their use of lines and colors

RIYADH: One of the rarest human anatomy manuscripts dating from the 14th century has found its way to the King Abdulaziz Public Library in the Kingdom’s capital.
The book, titled “The Anatomy of the Human Body,” is the earliest known book to dissect and draw the inside of the human body. It was written by Mansur bin Mohammed bin Ahmed bin Yusuf bin Ilias Al-Kashmiri between 1380 and 1391.
The book is one of the most precious Islamic medical manuscripts. It preceded the modern anatomy of the Belgian physician Andreas Vesalius and the Italian painter Leonardo da Vinci.
European scientists learnt from the book’s drawings and manuscripts and made anatomy a part of their recognized medical education. The illustrations, drawn with pen and inks of different colors, present the entire human body, with each drawing taking a whole page.

FASTFACT

The book, titled ‘The Anatomy of the Human Body,’ is the earliest known book to draw and dissect the inside of the human body.

The drawings demonstrate great craftsmanship in their use of lines and colors. They utilized the art of the Islamic miniatures, which was standard at the time the book was written, and were drawn with no tools other than pens.
The chapters cover the bones, nerves, muscles, veins, arteries, face, nose, liver and other organs of the human body, with the author writing in detail about the functions of the arteries and describing the veins as mobile veins that emerge from the left and right ventricles of the heart, where the diastole and systole occur.
The book, written in Persian, was transcribed by a scribe named Mohammed Hassan on Dec. 16, 1707.


Riyadh book fair set to kick off next month

Riyadh book fair set to kick off next month
Updated 16 September 2021

Riyadh book fair set to kick off next month

Riyadh book fair set to kick off next month
  • Organizers cut costs to expand global participation in the major publishing event

RIYADH: The Riyadh International Book Fair, one of the region’s largest cultural events, will open on Oct. 1 at Riyadh Front with the participation of Arab and global publishing houses.

Iraq will be the guest of honor at the 10-day international cultural fair.

The new session of the fair, being supervised by the Literature, Publishing and Translation Commission, will see a significant expansion of activities and events, representing 16 cultural sectors.

The commission has offered a 50 percent discount on space rent to publishing houses from around the world, dropping shipping costs and establishing an e-store and e-selling points for all publishers.

Saudi Cultural Minister Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan said that the books, publishing, language, translation and literature sectors receive great support from King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

He said that the fair is an important cultural event in the publishing industry, adding that it highlights Saudi creativity and stimulates cultural participation and trade cooperation, so that Saudi Arabia can become a global gateway for the publishing sector.

The Riyadh International Book Fair will include for the first time an international conference for publishers on Oct. 4 and 5 to strengthen communication between local, Arab and international publishing houses, activate partnerships between related institutions and companies, and sustainably enrich the regional scene through discussion sessions, interactive activities, workshops and seminars.

The fair will include cultural and literary symposiums, poetry and art readings, discussion panels, interactive activities, and diversified workshops in the fields of art, reading, writing, publishing, book making, and translation.


Who’s Who: Abdulmohsen bin Hussain Al-Mushait, Saudi Institute of Public Administration chief in Asir region

Who’s Who: Abdulmohsen bin Hussain Al-Mushait, Saudi Institute of Public Administration chief in Asir region
Updated 16 September 2021

Who’s Who: Abdulmohsen bin Hussain Al-Mushait, Saudi Institute of Public Administration chief in Asir region

Who’s Who: Abdulmohsen bin Hussain Al-Mushait, Saudi Institute of Public Administration chief in Asir region

Abdulmohsen bin Hussain Al-Mushait has been the director general of the Asir region’s branches of the Institute of Public Administration since 2018.

Al-Mushait received a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1994 from the college of administration and economics of King Abdulaziz University. 

In 1997, he completed his postgraduate studies in business education at the IPA, specializing in office management.

Prior to his recent position he worked for four years as the director general of the general administration of printing and publishing at the IPA in Riyadh. From 2002 to 2008 he directed the publishing department at the same institute, where he was also a coordinator of numerous preparatory and training programs.

He served as the general supervisor of the institute’s internal and external publishing and book fairs for 10 years from 2002.

He has attended many training courses, seminars and conferences inside Saudi Arabia and abroad. He has been a member — and on some cases chair — of numerous training and development committees of the IPA.

Al-Mushait has conducted some 6,000 training hours, preparatory programs and seminars at the IPA, where he has developed several programs.

For his outstanding contributions and achievements, Al-Mushait was awarded the King Abdulaziz Medal of the third class. He has also received many national and international certificates of thanks and appreciation.

He is a member of numerous committees in the administrative governorate of the Asir region, where he served as chairman
of the housing committee for several years.


Saudi Arabia launches new healthcare model program

Saudi Arabia launches new healthcare model program
Updated 16 September 2021

Saudi Arabia launches new healthcare model program

Saudi Arabia launches new healthcare model program
  • Makken’ Healthcare Model Program will activate a transformation by task-shifting a selection of valued employees in the ministry of health
  • Dr. Sami Al-Solami, CEO of the Health Academy, said the project includes international partnerships with educational institutions and universities

JEDDAH: The “Makken” Healthcare Model Program was inaugurated on Wednesday to prepare the working force and build competencies within the health communities in Saudi Arabia.

Dr. Sami Al-Solami, CEO of the Health Academy, said the project was aligned with health practitioners and that a platform was launched to introduce the healthcare program to the public.

“Makken training will activate a healthcare transformation by task-shifting a selection of valued employees in the Ministry of Health to roles within the new model,” Al-Solami told Arab News.

“We are aiming to provide the best quality of health services that will have a positive impact on the health of the citizens.”

The program was inaugurated by Saudi Minister of Health Dr. Tawfiq bin Fawzan Al-Rabiah, who is also the chairman of the board of trustees at the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties. The inauguration was held at the commission’s headquarters in Riyadh.

Al-Solami said the “Makken” program passes through four stages: The program, the readiness of the health communities, the trainer, and the trainees. He also noted the program includes international partnerships with educational institutions and universities.

Al-Rabiah said training and developing the health cadres will be an integral part of the healthcare program to elevate the overall system in the Kingdom.

“We are passing through a big transformation period for the healthcare system, and this transformation necessitates training and preparation for a new healthcare model and its requirements,” he said. “We need a different expertise and work style that ensures the efficiency of the healthcare system.”

Al-Rabiah thanked the Health Academy for its efforts in the new healthcare model, developing the training centers in the health communities, and the continued preparation and training of the health cadres.

In addition, he thanked the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties, which founded the Healthcare Academy, and the Health Holding Company.

“We support this training and work jointly to achieve the estimated benefit and expand it in the upcoming period,” Al-Rabiah said.

Dr. Mohammed bin Ibrahim Al-Saghir, CEO of the Health Holding Company, said the idea of Makken is an extension of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 in empowering individuals to oversee their own personal health.


Saudi Arabia joins global initiative to protect ozone layer

Saudi Arabia joins global initiative to protect ozone layer
Updated 16 September 2021

Saudi Arabia joins global initiative to protect ozone layer

Saudi Arabia joins global initiative to protect ozone layer

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia is to take part in a global initiative to protect the ozone layer.

The Kingdom, represented by the National Center for Environmental Compliance, will on Thursday join celebrations to mark the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer.

On Sept. 16, 1987, more than 190 countries signed the Montreal Protocol to determine the procedures to be followed at a global level for the phasing out of ozone-depleting substances.

The ozone layer is a thin part of the Earth’s atmosphere that absorbs most of the ultraviolet radiation from the Sun but when depleted more UV radiation can reach the surface potentially harming humans and other living things.

NCEC spokesman, Abdullah Al-Mutairi, said: “The National Strategy for the Environment represents an important pillar that distinguishes the Kingdom from others, as it takes into account Saudi Arabia’s leading value regionally and internationally and its remarkable leadership in the environmental aspect in general, and those aspects related to the preservation of the ozone layer in particular.”

FASTFACTS

The ozone layer is a thin part of the Earth’s atmosphere that absorbs most of the ultraviolet radiation from the Sun but when depleted more UV radiation can reach the surface potentially harming humans and other living things.

On Sept. 16, 1987, more than 190 countries signed the Montreal Protocol to determine the procedures to be followed at a global level for the phasing out of ozone-depleting substances.

He pointed out that the Kingdom had confirmed its active partnership and seriousness in adopting the Montreal Protocol by entrusting the NCEC with the job of implementing regulations governing ozone-depleting substances and hydrofluorocarbons (better known as HFCs).

These compounds are characterized by their chemical stability in the near-surface atmosphere and contain one or more atoms of chlorine, bromine, or both, kicking off sequential interactions in the upper atmosphere stratosphere, leading to ozone depletion.

Al-Mutairi noted the NCEC’s ongoing coordination and cooperation with the UN Environment Program.

“The Kingdom’s positive presence extends to legislation to cooperate with all environmental entities worldwide and join hands to preserve and sustain the components of a rich environment, preparing and implementing mentoring programs and providing awareness materials, as well as organizing meetings and workshops to implement this important protocol, supporting partnerships with the government and private sectors so as to promote environmental work and enhance its technologies,” he added.

The center’s spokesman also highlighted efforts by international partners to exchange information and expertise and conduct relevant studies with private sector organizations to provide environmentally friendly technologies in the Kingdom that contributed to the sustainability of the ozone layer.

He said that the center worked with relevant authorities to regulate the import and export of substances harmful to the ozone layer and implement programs and activities that reduced ozone pollution and degradation.

The NCEC was also responsible for organizing several training programs to raise skill levels among technicians and other practitioners involved in environmental work, Al-Mutairi added.


New campaign to help Saudi Arabia’s legion of internet addicts

New campaign to help Saudi Arabia’s legion of internet addicts
Updated 16 September 2021

New campaign to help Saudi Arabia’s legion of internet addicts

New campaign to help Saudi Arabia’s legion of internet addicts
  • Excessive use of social media and online gaming is a threat to family stability, campaign chief says
  • Study finds 46% of participants spend between 2 and 5 hours a day on social media or playing online games

MAKKAH: The growing dependence on the internet has dramatically changed the way people communicate with one another. With the rise in social media content and a boom in the online gaming industry, Saudis are more connected than ever before.
As Saudi Arabia continues to grow, both online and offline, 95.7 percent of its 34.8 million population now have internet capabilities. Earlier this year, Minister of Communications and Information Technology Abdullah Al-Swaha announced that the Kingdom ranked seventh place globally in 5G technology and internet speed, which means more people are connected, making it potentially easier to stay online for more extended periods than necessary.
In collaboration with “Social Impact Corporation UK,” Saudi Arabia’s Mawaddah Society for Family Development in Makkah launched its campaign “Use it, do not get addicted,” which aims to shed light on the emerging problem of internet addiction — specifically social media and online gaming — along with the social and economic impact it has on the Kingdom. The study was led by Dr. Maen Altengi, an entrepreneur who specializes in data and social impacts, and Tania Gupta, the director of data science, engineering, and analytics at marketing agency MRM, who also studied internet social science at Oxford University.
More than 1,200 participants were included in the study as the information was sent through online surveys and short messages via social media outlets.
The results showed that 46 percent of people in the study spend between two and five hours a day going through social media and/or playing online games. Participants who spent more than six hours a day made up 36 percent while 6 percent spent less than one hour a day engaging on social media and/or online games.
Mawaddah director general Mohammed Al-Radhi said the campaign aims to increase societal awareness regarding the danger of internet addiction, ways to fight it, and provide treatment consultations for technology addiction.
He told Arab News that 23 percent of family problems were due to internet addiction and pornographic films based on his past research. 
“The campaign comes to enhance awareness in a large segment of society about the dangers of internet addiction and ways of treatment through several media channels,” Al-Radhi said.
“We are preparing to turn the campaign into a treatment program for technology addicts in an attempt to preserve the cohesion and stability of the family.”
Although it is not technically considered a clinical addiction, Al-Radhi said internet addiction disorder is caused by a pathological and compulsive use of the internet, which weakens an individual’s function in society, the family, and various other areas of life.
“Technology addiction also leads to a lack of communication between individuals and creates problems due to moods and behavioral disturbance,” Al-Radhi said. “There is also a mental health impact of addiction when it comes to social media, games, browsing websites, pornography, and online purchases.”
He suggested the establishment of consulting centers to cure technology addiction and setting a limit for internet use, particularly for children, as positive means of breaking the habit. 
“Strategies should be developed to control the volume and type of use of the internet through trainers and parents, setting societal programs to help manage addiction, and being keen on promoting participatory technology with society,” Al-Radhi said.
He said the cost of wasted opportunities due to social media and online gaming use among Saudis reached SR92 billion ($23.92 billion).
The most outstanding result of the study, Al-Radhi said, is that 25 percent of internet users in the Kingdom understood and acknowledged the negative effect of internet overuse on their social life and their productivity at work.


According to the study, 20 percent of the participants said that they still need to spend more time on the internet and that 34 percent had attempted to minimize their internet use on social media and online gaming, but to no avail.
Al-Radhi also said 32 percent of the participants in the study admitted they used social media or online gaming to combat their daily life problems or improve their behavior.
Mohammed Hussein Al-Abdali, a high school student in Makkah, said that he spends most of his time on social media, specifically Snapchat.
“I found the diversity that I was looking for through the presence of Snapchat celebrities,” Al-Abdali said. “Some provide meaningful content and some of them provide useless content.”
Sharing the same sentiment, 17-year-old high school student Awad Ammar Al-Hadhali from Jeddah told Arab News that he faces a big problem when he is offline. He said he prefers his social media feed, watching his favorites series on Netflix, and having quick access to his online games to actual in-person entertainment.
“They are an integral part of my daily life,” Al-Hadhali said. “It is the way it is in today’s world. You are never disconnected.”
Al-Radhi said the problem with internet addiction will only get worse over time.
“It becomes harder for addicts to control using the internet now or in the future,” he said. “This is why it is necessary to think in more realistic, comprehensive, and creative ways to deal with this issue.”