Hezbollah brings Iranian fuel into Lebanon, Al-Manar TV says

Hezbollah brings Iranian fuel into Lebanon, Al-Manar TV says
Vehicles ride near a banner depicting Syria's President Bashar al-Assad, and Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei as the first truck carrying Iranian fuel is expected to reach Lebanon today, near the Lebanese-Syrian border, in Lebanon. (Reuters)
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Updated 16 September 2021

Hezbollah brings Iranian fuel into Lebanon, Al-Manar TV says

Hezbollah brings Iranian fuel into Lebanon, Al-Manar TV says
  • The decision to import fuel marks an expansion of the role played by the Iran-backed Hezbollah in Lebanon

BEIRUT: Hezbollah began bringing Iranian fuel into Lebanon via Syria on Thursday, a move the Shiite group says aims to ease a crippling energy crisis but which its opponents have said exposes the country to the risk of US sanctions.
Quoting its correspondent, Hezbollah’s Al-Manar TV said a convoy of around 20 tanker trucks carrying Iranian fuel oil had entered Lebanon. The Iran-backed Hezbollah has said the ship carrying the fuel docked in Syria on Sunday.
The trucks crossed into northeastern Lebanon near the village of Al-Ain, where a banner declared that Hezbollah had broken a “siege” on Lebanon.
“Thank you Iran. Thank you Assad’s Syria,” declared another banner, referring to Syrian President Bashar Assad.
The energy crisis is a result of a financial meltdown that has devastated the Lebanese economy since 2019, sinking the currency by some 90 percent and sending more than three quarters of the population into poverty.
Fuel supplies have dried up because Lebanon does not have enough hard currency to cover even vital imports, forcing essential services including some hospitals to scale back or shut down and sparking numerous security incidents.
The decision to import fuel marks an expansion of the role played by the Iran-backed Hezbollah in Lebanon, where critics have long accused the heavily armed group that has fought wars with Israel of acting as a state within the state.
Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah said on Monday the ship had docked in Syria to avoid harming Lebanon and to avoid embarrassing some of its allies, an apparent reference to the sanctions risk.
Washington has reiterated that US sanctions on Iranian oil sales remain in place, but it has not said whether it is considering imposing measures against Lebanon over the move by Hezbollah.
Washington designates Hezbollah as a terrorist group and has also targeted it with sanctions.
The United States, a big supplier of humanitarian and military aid to Lebanon, is backing a plan to ease the energy crisis using Egyptian natural gas piped via Jordan and Syria. The US ambassador has said Lebanon does not need Iranian fuel.
Nasrallah has said a second ship with fuel oil would arrive in the Syrian port of Baniyas in a few days, with a third and fourth, respectively carrying gasoline and fuel oil, also due.


Nabd Al-Riyadh shows the present Kingdom on the walls of past

Nabd Al-Riyadh shows the present Kingdom on the walls of past
Updated 10 min 23 sec ago

Nabd Al-Riyadh shows the present Kingdom on the walls of past

Nabd Al-Riyadh shows the present Kingdom on the walls of past
  • Nabd Al-Riyadh, which means the pulse of the capital, presents the rich past of the Kingdom since its foundation through more than 400 storytelling visual presentations

RIYADH: Nabd Al-Riyadh, one of Riyadh Season’s 14 zones, opened its doors for visitors this week to take them on a visually enhanced journey to explore the history, heritage and culture of Saudi Arabia.

The zone, which is free, was a popular feature of Riyadh Season when it first appeared in 2019. This year it has been given an extra touch of music and shows from all around the world to accompany the Saudi folklore and keep the visitors entertained.

Nabd Al-Riyadh, which means the pulse of the capital, presents the rich past of the Kingdom since its foundation through more than 400 storytelling visual presentations. The zone perfectly embodies Saudi cultural traditions and heritage with an artistic simulation of its history projected on the walls of Masmak Palace.

Abdulhameed Fouzi, a visitor from Tabuk, said that Masmak Palace “is one of the places I really wanted to visit and see in person.”

“Masmak Palace is often where the people pledged allegiance to their kings. This is where everything used to happen in the past,” said Rana Al-Wakeel, another visitor.

The zone offers entertainment for individuals, families, and children with musical performances and art shows that will continue until mid-January 2022.

The events at Nabd Al-Riyadh include the Safat Square, which has sand painting, Rubik’s square painting, “3D” street art, glitter art and theatrical and musical performances, as well as the Safat Caffe, which serves traditional drinks and sweets.

The Al-Masmak Square area includes artistic, theatrical, and interactive performances, while the Nabd Al-Riyadh theatre features more than 30 Saudi and international bands, orchestras and singers.


UN warned its credibility is at stake over the Palestinian question

UN warned its credibility is at stake over the Palestinian question
Updated 12 min 53 sec ago

UN warned its credibility is at stake over the Palestinian question

UN warned its credibility is at stake over the Palestinian question
  • General Assembly President Abdulla Shahid reiterated that a two-state solution is the only way forward and said ‘we cannot give up hope’
  • His comments came days after the 74 th anniversary of Resolution 181, which called for the partition of Palestine into Arab and Jewish states

NEW YORK: There is more at stake in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict than peace and security in the Middle East, according to Abdulla Shahid, the president of the UN General Assembly.

The reputation of the global community and its ability to work together to resolve international disputes, in keeping with the founding vision of the UN, is also on the line, he warned.

“That is why we cannot give up hope,” said Shahid as he calling on member states to make every effort to join forces to resolve the conflict in line with international human rights and humanitarian laws, and the UN charter.

“We must maintain the credibility of this great institution and push for positive dialogue and engagement between the parties involved.”

Speaking on Wednesday during a plenary meeting of the General Assembly to discuss the Palestinian question and the situation in the wider Middle East, Shahid described as “disheartening” the lack of progress on an issue that has been on the UN agenda since the organization’s earliest years.

The situations in Palestine and the wider region are “deeply intertwined,” he said.

“We have seen time and time again how the spillover effects of the Palestinian-Israeli dispute undermine the stability of the broader region,” he added.

“As long as the Palestinian people are deprived of statehood, as long as illegal settlements continue to be built on land that Palestinians are justly entitled to, as long as Palestinian families are forced to flee the violence and injustices against them and they cannot return home, anger and bitterness will fester.

“This will contribute to a cycle of violence that has gone on for far, far too long.”

The plenary session came days after the 74th anniversary of resolution 181, which was passed by the General Assembly on Nov. 29, 1947. It called for the partition of Palestine into Arab and Jewish states, with the city of Jerusalem a separate entity to be governed by an international regime.

Facilitating a two-state solution based on pre-1967 borders is the “most important thing” the world can do to help resolve the conflict, said Shahid, who called for an acceleration of the multilateral political process to find a just and peaceful settlement.

Turning to key issues affecting Palestinians, he said it is time for the international community to back its words with actions in terms of humanitarian assistance, support for efforts to resolve the conflict, and upholding the dignity of Palestinians.

“Year after year we speak of the appalling humanitarian crisis in Palestine, especially the Gaza strip,” Shahid said. “But words are insufficient. Words cannot substitute for the lack of running water, electricity, proper sanitation, and decent living conditions that millions of Palestinians endure.

“Words can express how COVID-19 has exacerbated these challenges but they cannot resolve them. Words cannot save Palestinian people suffering from decades of occupation, arbitrary arrests and the use of excessive force against them. Words cannot restore their demolished homes or halt the proliferation of illegal settlements on their land.”

More than half of the five million Palestinians in the Occupied Territories are dependent on humanitarian assistance to survive. That number rises to 80 percent in Gaza, where residents “cry out for access to even basic amenities and services,”  Shahid said.

The many Palestinian refugees across the Middle East are also in jeopardy, he added, highlighting the large shortfall in funding for the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East. He called on the international community to ensure it provides enough financial support to maintain the life-saving work of the agency.

“Let us all come together as an international community and reiterate our commitment to protect the rights of the Palestinian people,” said Shahid.

“Let us grant them what they have been justly demanding for so long: dignity, statehood and respect.”


Former Finnish F1 driver enjoys Saudi hospitality 

Former Finnish F1 driver enjoys Saudi hospitality 
Updated 33 min 50 sec ago

Former Finnish F1 driver enjoys Saudi hospitality 

Former Finnish F1 driver enjoys Saudi hospitality 
  • Danube, the supermarket and hypermarket chain in Saudi Arabia, hosted a “Racing Kitchen” event at Red Sea Mall in Jeddah with Häkkinen
  • Two Finnish drivers, Kimi Räikkönen and Valtteri Bottas, will also be participating at the Saudi Grand Prix

JEDDAH: The inaugural edition of the Saudi Arabian Grand Prix is set to be held in Jeddah from Dec. 3. 

Mika Häkkinen, a two-time Formula One champion and founder of the INZDR app, is in Jeddah to create awareness about the importance of maintaining a healthy diet.

The Finnish racing legend has been telling locals that “consuming a healthy, nutrient-rich diet is key to performing at your peak when you are an athlete and in general for living a radiant life.” 

Danube, the supermarket and hypermarket chain in Saudi Arabia, hosted a “Racing Kitchen” event at Red Sea Mall in Jeddah with Häkkinen.

The “Racing Kitchen,” hosted on the Danube app during the F1 season, features an array of nourishing recipes that could be part of a nutrient-rich diet to inspire an optimized lifestyle. 

Häkkinen, who is thrilled to be in Saudi Arabia, said: “Whenever I used to race, I always wanted to speak to the people of that country, understand their culture. Even though I am a two-time F1 world champion and the treatment will be special, I still wanted to understand how they will treat me. I have found Saudis to be very kind, nice, and polite. It reflects their parents’ and grandparents’ upbringing. With this kind of behavior, I have made lots of friends.” 

Through the INZDR app, the former Finnish driver said that F1 enthusiasts “can also learn more about the sport and get access to exclusive content from their favourite drivers.”

Two Finnish drivers, Kimi Räikkönen and Valtteri Bottas, will also be participating at the Saudi Grand Prix. Commenting on who has a high chance of winning, Häkkinen said: “Kimi will retire at the end of this year. He had a great career in his life and he did fantastic work. I admire his energy which he gave to F1. Talking about the general speed, I do not think they have a really good chance but with F1 you never know what will happen. Speaking of Valterri Battos, he can be really good in the Saudi Grand Prix and may have a chance to win it too.”


US oil pares gains after weekly fuel stockpiles jump

US oil pares gains after weekly fuel stockpiles jump
Updated 48 min 32 sec ago

US oil pares gains after weekly fuel stockpiles jump

US oil pares gains after weekly fuel stockpiles jump
  • A new coronavirus variant triggered fresh travel restrictions that could dampen oil demand
  • White House was still studying proposals from Democratic lawmakers to ban crude oil exports to keep US prices down

DUBAI: West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil futures slipped on Wednesday, reversing course from early gains after a US official said the country was still considering tools to lower energy prices, and as government data pointed to weaker gasoline demand.
Also pressuring oil prices, a new coronavirus variant triggered fresh travel restrictions that could dampen oil demand. Also, an OPEC+ document showed the group lifting its forecast for an oil surplus in the new year.
WTI US crude futures were down 51 cents, or 0.76 percent, at $65.77 a barrel at 1:49 p.m. ET (1849 GMT). During the session, they were up as much as 4 percent.
Global benchmark Brent crude was down 24 cents, or 0.36 percent, at $68.99 a barrel.
US Deputy Energy Secretary David Turk said the Biden administration could adjust the timing of its planned release of strategic crude oil stockpiles if global energy prices drop substantially.
He added that the White House was still studying proposals from Democratic lawmakers to ban crude oil exports to keep US prices down.
US gasoline stocks rose 4 million barrels last week to 215.4 million barrels, government data showed, far surpassing analysts’ expectations in a Reuters poll for 29,000-barrel rise. Distillate stockpiles increased 2.2 million barrels to 123.9 million barrels, versus expectations for a 462,000-barrel build.
Crude inventories fell 910,000 barrels in the week, data showed, compared with forecasts for a 1.2 million-barrel drop.
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries concluded its meeting without a decision on whether to release more oil into the market.
The OPEC+ alliance, which includes Russia and other producers, will likely take a policy decision on Thursday. Reports and analysts suggested that expectations were growing that the group will take a pause due to the threat from a new virus variant.
“There is much to suggest that OPEC+ will not initially step up its oil production any further in an effort to maintain current prices at around $70/bbl,” PVM analyst Stephen Brennock said.
OPEC+ sees the oil surplus growing to 2 million barrels per day (bpd) in January, 3.4 million bpd in February and 3.8 million bpd in March next year, an internal report seen by Reuters showed.
Several OPEC+ ministers, though, have said there is no need to change course. But even if OPEC+ agrees to go ahead with its planned supply increase in January, producers may struggle to add that much.
Both Brent and WTI front-month contracts in November posted their steepest monthly falls in percentage terms since March 2020, down 16 percent and 21 percent respectively.
Analysts at Goldman Sachs called the decline in oil prices “excessive,” saying “the market has far overshot the likely impact of the latest variant on oil demand with the structural repricing higher due to the dramatic change in the oil supply reaction function still ahead of us.”


What We Are Reading Today: Managing Medical Authority by Daniel A. Menchik

What We Are Reading Today: Managing Medical Authority by Daniel A. Menchik
Updated 20 min 54 sec ago

What We Are Reading Today: Managing Medical Authority by Daniel A. Menchik

What We Are Reading Today: Managing Medical Authority by Daniel A. Menchik

Exploring how the authority of medicine is controlled, negotiated, and organized, Managing Medical Authority asks: How is knowledge shared throughout the profession? Who makes decisions when your heart malfunctions—physicians, hospital administrators, or private companies who sell pacemakers? How do physicians gain and keep their influence? Arguing that medicine’s authority is managed in collegial competition across venues, Daniel Menchik examines the full range of stakeholders driving the direction of the field: Medical trainees, clinicians, researchers, administrators, and even the corporations that develop groundbreaking technologies enabling longer and better lives.