Shows, events canceled in the UAE for mourning period

Shows, events canceled in the UAE for mourning period
Trevor Noah was set to speak at the fifth edition of the Culture Summit in the UAE. (AFP)
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Updated 14 May 2022

Shows, events canceled in the UAE for mourning period

Shows, events canceled in the UAE for mourning period

DUBAI: Multiple cultural shows and events in the UAE, including Culture Summit Abu Dhabi and Dubai Comedy Festival, have been postponed following the death of the country’s president Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al-Nahyan. 

On Friday, the Ministry of Presidential Affairs announced 40 days of mourning with flags at half-mast from Friday, with work suspended in the public and private sector for the first three days, starting Saturday. 

Culture Summit Abu Dhabi was scheduled to take place May 16-18 at Manarat Al-Saadiyat island. The Department of Culture and Tourism is yet to announce the new dates. 

Dubai Comedy Festival will reschedule its upcoming shows including Vir Das, Jo Koy, The Comedy Bizarre and The Laughter Factory till May 16. 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Mohamed Hamaki (@hamaki)

Kuwait, along with several other countries, also announced three days of mourning. Egyptian singer Mohamed Hamaki canceled his concert in Kuwait, which was scheduled to take place on May 13, in honor of the late president. 


‘Top Gun: Maverick’ offers high-octane action, nostalgia

‘Top Gun: Maverick’ offers high-octane action, nostalgia
Updated 6 sec ago

‘Top Gun: Maverick’ offers high-octane action, nostalgia

‘Top Gun: Maverick’ offers high-octane action, nostalgia

CHENNAI: “Top Gun: Maverick” is not all action and high-flying antics — it has tender moments, poignant nostalgia and a touch of romance that make Tom Cruise’s Pete “Maverick” Mitchell endearingly humane. A sequel to Tony Scott’s 1986 “Top Gun,” a blockbuster that is said to have caused a spike in US military enlistment, this fresh take is sure to enrapture crowds once again.

The film, which played at the just-concluded Cannes Film Festival, is enriched by the presence of a boyish and charming Cruise, who is a trained pilot and executed many stunts in the movie propelled by director Joseph Kosinski. The high-octane action is nail biting with daredevil maneuvers that are magical to watch.  

The sequel catches up with Maverick after more than 30 years of service as one of the Navy’s top aviators. He is seen pushing the envelope as a courageous test pilot and dodging the advancement in rank that would ground him, before a dangerous mission comes his way.

The narrative falls into a predictable pattern after that, but the flying — during the practice sessions and the actual operation — is exhilarating with the action sequences captured with clockwork precision by cinematographer Claudio Miranda. What is more, they look authentic — indeed, they are, for we are told Cruise is famously averse to CGI, opting instead to perform white-knuckling stunts himself. Production designer Jeremy Hindle got hold of old fighter jets and refurbished them to create believable and engaging action sequences.

Much of the runtime is confined to this, but when the film moves to a tender love story between Penny (Jennifer Connelly), who runs a local bar, and Maverick, we understand that he is not just obsessed with his planes. This plotline allows for a more nuanced version of the lead character to come to the fore, and the film is all the better for it.  

Kosinski and editor Eddie Hamilton, as well as the writers, are careful to keep the balance intact between this personal drama and the flying adventures. The score by Harold Faltermeyer, Lady Gaga and Hans Zimmer also adds to the enjoyment quotient, with Lady Gaga’s song “Hold My Hand” of particular noteworthiness. But in the end, “Top Gun: Maverick” is all about death-defying action and miraculous escapes and will give cinema-goers a wild ride.


Cannes Film Festival: Egyptian thriller nabs screenplay prize, ‘Triangle of Sadness’ wins Palme d’Or

Cannes Film Festival: Egyptian thriller nabs screenplay prize, ‘Triangle of Sadness’ wins Palme d’Or
Updated 26 min 34 sec ago

Cannes Film Festival: Egyptian thriller nabs screenplay prize, ‘Triangle of Sadness’ wins Palme d’Or

Cannes Film Festival: Egyptian thriller nabs screenplay prize, ‘Triangle of Sadness’ wins Palme d’Or
  • Swedish-Egyptian filmmaker Tarik Saleh's 'Boy From Heaven' wins best screenplay award
  • Zar Amir Ebrahimi selected as best actress for her performance as a journalist in Ali Abbasi’s 'Holy Spider”
  • Korean star Song Kang Ho wins best actor for his performance in Hirokazu Kore-eda’s 'Broker'

CANNES, France: Ruben Ostlund’s social satire “Triangle of Sadness” won the Palme d’Or at the 75th Cannes Film Festival on Saturday, handing Ostlund one of cinema’s most prestigious prizes for the second time. Meanwhile, Swedish-Egyptian filmmaker Tarik Saleh took best screenplay at Cannes for “Boy From Heaven,” a thriller set in Cairo’s Al-Azhar Mosque.
The festival also named Korean star Song Kang Ho best actor for his performance in Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda’s film “Broker,” about Korean family seeking a home for an abandoned baby.
“I’d like to thank all those who appreciate Korean cinema,” said Song, who also starred in Bong Joon Ho’s Palme d’Or winning film “Parasite” in Cannes three years ago.
Best actress went to Zar Amir Ebrahimi for her performance as a journalist in Ali Abbasi’s “Holy Spider,” a true-crime thriller about a serial killer targeting sex workers in the Iranian religious city of Mashhad. Violent and graphic, “Holy Spider” wasn’t permitted to shoot in Iran and instead was made in Jordan. Accepting the award, Ebrahimi said the film depicts “everything that’s impossible to show in Iran.”
The awards were selected by a nine-member jury headed by French actor Vincent Lindon.
The jury prize was split between friendship tale “The Eight Mountains,” by Charlotte Vandermeersch and Felix Van Groeningen, and Polish director Jerzy Skolimowski’s “EO,” about a donkey’s journey across a pitiless modern Europe.
“I would like to thank my donkeys,” said Skolimowski, who used six donkeys while making the film.
This year’s award for best first film, the Camera d’Or, went to Riley Keough and Gina Gammell for “War Pony,” a drama about the Pine Ridge Reservation made in collaboration with Oglala Lakota and Sicangu Lakota citizens.
Saturday’s closing ceremony brings to a close a Cannes that has attempted to fully resuscitate the annual France extravaganza which was canceled in 2020 by the pandemic and saw modest crowds last year. This year’s festival also unspooled against the backdrop of the war in Ukraine, which sparked red-carpet protests and a dialogue about the purpose of cinema in wartime.
Last year, the French body horror thriller “Titane” took the top prize at Cannes, making director Julia Decournau only the second female filmmaker ever to win the Palme. In 2019, Bong Joon Ho’s “Parasite” triumphed in Cannes before doing the same at the Academy Awards.
This year, the biggest Hollywood films at Cannes — “Elvis,”“Top Gun: Maverick,”“Three Thousand Years of Longing” — played outside Cannes’ competition lineup of 21 films. But their presence helped restore some of Cannes’ glamor after the pandemic scaling down the festival for the last two years.


Actors Mona Zaki, Aseel Omran jet to Cannes for festival closing 

Actors Mona Zaki, Aseel Omran jet to Cannes for festival closing 
Updated 28 May 2022

Actors Mona Zaki, Aseel Omran jet to Cannes for festival closing 

Actors Mona Zaki, Aseel Omran jet to Cannes for festival closing 

DUBAI: A handful of Arab celebrities have been spotted at the 75th Cannes Film Festival since organizers rolled out the red carpet on May 17. 

As the festival comes to an end, the red carpet played host to two more stars from the region: Egyptian actress Mona Zaki and Saudi singer, TV presenter and actress Aseel Omran.

The stars attended the screening of French screenwriter Leonor Serraille’s second feature, “Mother And Son (Un Petit Frere),” championing celebrity-loved Arab designers. 

Zaki stepped out wearing a form-fitting black gown from Lebanese designer Georges Hobeika’s fall/winter 2022-2023 collection. The dress, with a low back, featured geometric crystal detailing. 

Omran, the Khobar-born star, opted for a fully embroidered dress from US superstar Jennifer Lopez’s favorite designer Zuhair Murad.  

The blue floor-length flowing dress is off-the-shoulder and featured feather-detailing.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Aseel | أسيل (@aseel)

The stars are both brand ambassadors for the cosmetics company L’Oreal Paris, which they were representing at the film festival. 

“So excited to be @festivaldecannes with @lorealparis,” wrote Zaki to her 7.4 million followers. 

In March, Omran was named as the first Middle East ambassador for French luxury label Dior. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Aseel | أسيل (@aseel)

The songstress, known for her roles in TV shows including Netflix’s “Black Crows,” “Qabel Lil Kaser” and “Harun Al-Rashid,” rose to fame following her participation in reality TV shows “Gulf Stars” and “Hiya wa Huwa.”

The 32-year-old musician and fashion star has also partnered with other international brands including Italian luxury fashion house Bulgari.

Meanwhile, Zaki, 45, is a renowned Egyptian actress who started her career at the age of 16. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Aseel | أسيل (@aseel)

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One of her most recent films is the action-thriller “The Spider,” which is currently in theaters in the Middle East. She stars alongside Egyptian actor Ahmed El-Sakka. 

The actress also starred in the Arabic remake of the hit Italian feature “Perfect Strangers,” which was released on Netflix in January. 

The Cannes Film Festival was also attended by Palestinian-Dutch model Bella Hadid, part-Saudi catwalk star Shanina Shaik, Saudi actress Fatima Al-Banawi and Tunisian-French model Sonia Ben Ammar, to name a few. 


US-Egyptian designer Jacquie Aiche talks new collection, working with Sofia Richie

US-Egyptian designer Jacquie Aiche talks new collection, working with Sofia Richie
Updated 28 May 2022

US-Egyptian designer Jacquie Aiche talks new collection, working with Sofia Richie

US-Egyptian designer Jacquie Aiche talks new collection, working with Sofia Richie

DUBAI: Celebrity-loved jewelry label Jacquie Aiche’s recently released collection, “Divine Rising,” is all about summer loving — and the part-Egyptian designer behind the brand spoke to Arab News about the inspiration behind the line. 

Inspired by “Mother Earth,” the designer, who was born to an Egyptian father and an Indigenous American mother, explained that the new release celebrates the creative energy drawn from new beginnings.

“It seems as if everything around us is going through an incredible period of rebirth and transformation, so I wanted to honor this sense of renewal, and the beautiful, wild nature it carries,” the designer said. 

For this collection, the jeweler tapped US model Sofia Richie to front her campaign.  

The 23-year-old It-girl posed in the brand’s diamond-encrusted body chains, bracelets, earrings and rings which were designed and handcrafted in Aiche’s studio.

“Sofia radiates such a natural, ethereal glow and was an absolute dream to work with,” said Aiche. “Her energy made the jewels shine even brighter.”

For Aiche, jewelry is “everything” — it is much more than just adornment. “It speaks to the soul. It is a form of self-expression, a way of deep healing and a talisman of personal meaning,” she explained. 

The designer’s main goal with her brand, she said, is to create pieces that carry “special, transformative energy” that brighten up her customers. I want to spread the love I feel daily,” she said. 

Aiche launched her eponymous label from her garage in 2008. 

When she first began making jewelry, she would design pieces anonymously and sell them in her boutique, she said.

“At that time, fine jewelry was so traditional but I wanted to create pieces that felt special, spiritual and personal,” she said. “I felt so connected to the healing power of precious stones and wanted to share that energy with the world. When I saw how women responded to my pieces, I knew I was on the right path since the brand has taken a life of its own.”

She has since amassed an impressive celebrity client list that includes Hailey Bieber, Usher, Rihanna, Jada Pinkett Smith and Blake Lively.

“I have such a strong, beautiful tribe, who have all sort of organically found and gravitated towards my designs. I love that about life, the unknown and the unexpected,” she said. 


Dig in: Fast food spots to try in Saudi Arabia

Dig in: Fast food spots to try in Saudi Arabia
Updated 28 May 2022

Dig in: Fast food spots to try in Saudi Arabia

Dig in: Fast food spots to try in Saudi Arabia

From international hotspots to homegrown eateries, these restaurants in Saudi Arabia are so much more than your basic fast food joints. 

Fatburger 

Besides their juicy burgers, foodies in Riyadh can dig into the signature fat and skinny fries alongside Fatburger’s beef that is freshly ground and grilled to perfection.

Hamburgini

Hamburgini has sharing packages at affordable prices that will make for a great after-pool meal with your family and friends this summer.

Century Burger

Hungry fans can choose from toppings galore at this burger joint. It is also known for its colored, flavored buns like the black garlic and pink spicy bread. 

Section-B

For all the vegans out there, Section-B has got you covered with their vegan patties and array of plant-based topping options. 

Johnny Rockets 

It’s popular for a reason — the well-known US eatery offers everything from angus beef burgers and tender chicken sandwiches to loaded hotdogs.

Buffalo’s Express 

Love chicken wings? This restaurant boasts traditional and boneless wings slathered in an array of sauces, from honey garlic to Asian sesame and fired up BBQ sauce. 

Jan Burger

Crispy tenders, curly fries, grilled burgers and delicious sauces – Jan Burger has it all. Whether you are on a health kick or in the mood for fried goodies, this spot has something for everyone.