Charity Commission: No action needed over Prince Charles Qatari cash donation

Prince Charles meets with Ukrainian refugees holding a Ukrainian flag during his visit to Launceston, where he was proclaimed The Duke of Cornwall in 1973, in Cornwall on July 19, 2022. (Reuters/File Photo)
Prince Charles meets with Ukrainian refugees holding a Ukrainian flag during his visit to Launceston, where he was proclaimed The Duke of Cornwall in 1973, in Cornwall on July 19, 2022. (Reuters/File Photo)
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Updated 20 July 2022

Charity Commission: No action needed over Prince Charles Qatari cash donation

Charity Commission: No action needed over Prince Charles Qatari cash donation
  • Last month the Sunday Times reported the heir to the British throne had been personally given €3 million in cash by ex-Qatari prime minister

LONDON: Britain’s Charity Commission said on Wednesday it had decided against carrying out any further investigation into a large sum of cash given to Prince Charles which he then handed over to one of his charities.
Last month the Sunday Times reported the heir to the British throne had been personally given €3 million ($3.05 million) in cash by ex-Qatari prime minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al-Thani between 2011 and 2015, some of it in shopping bags.
Charles’ office said the money was handed over to one of his charities which carried out appropriate governance and gave assurances that all the correct processes were followed. Anti-monarchy campaign group Republic, however, said it had written to regulator the Charity Commission to demand an investigation.
“We have assessed the information provided by the charity and have determined there is no further regulatory role for the Commission,” a Charity Commission spokesperson said.
The Sunday Times said there was no suggestion that the payments were illegal, but a senior royal source has since said Prince Charles would not now accept large sums of cash handed over to him for his charities.


Chechnya’s Kadyrov says sending teenage sons to Ukraine front

Chechnya’s Kadyrov says sending teenage sons to Ukraine front
Updated 03 October 2022

Chechnya’s Kadyrov says sending teenage sons to Ukraine front

Chechnya’s Kadyrov says sending teenage sons to Ukraine front
  • Ramzan Kadyrov, a former warlord who leads the Muslim-majority Chechnya republic, has been one of the most vocal supporters of Putin’s Ukraine offensive
  • Kadyrov’s post on Telegram concering his sons came as the Kremlin dismissed his call to use low-yield nuclear weapons in Ukraine after a series of military defeats

MOSCOW: Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov, an ally of President Vladimir Putin, said Monday he was sending three of his teenage sons — aged 14, 15 and 16 — to the Ukraine front.
“It’s time to prove themselves in a real fight, I can only welcome this desire,” Kadyrov wrote on Telegram, posting a video of the young boys firing missiles in a shooting range.
“Soon they will go to the front line and will be on the most difficult sections of the contact line.”
He said Akhmat (16), Eli (15) and Adam (14) have been trained for combat “almost from their youngest years” and insisted he was “not joking.”
The video showed the boys in camouflage clothing and dark glasses, on tanks, guns strapped to their waists, shooting rocket launchers and machine guns.
At times the teenagers smile while shooting or made a thumbs-up gesture.
Kadyrov, a former warlord who leads the Muslim-majority Chechnya republic, has been one of the most vocal supporters of Putin’s Ukraine offensive.
The post came as the Kremlin on Monday dismissed his call to use low-yield nuclear weapons in Ukraine after a series of military defeats.
“This is a very emotional moment,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said during a daily briefing with journalists, referring to his statements.
“In our country, the use of nuclear weapons happens only on the basis of what is stated in the relevant doctrine,” Peskov said.
Peskov nevertheless hailed the “heroic contributions” of the Chechen leader to the military operation in Ukraine.
Kadyrov called on the nuclear option after Moscow withdrew from the town of Lyman, which took weeks to gain control of earlier this year.
“In my personal opinion, more drastic measures should be taken, up to the declaration of martial law in the border areas and use of low-yield nuclear weapons,” Kadyrov said on his Telegram channel.
He also criticized Colonel-General Alexander Lapin, who is in charge of Russia’s forces fighting in the region, calling him “mediocre.”


Egyptian scholars win prestigious award for energy research

Egyptian scholars win prestigious award for energy research
Updated 03 October 2022

Egyptian scholars win prestigious award for energy research

Egyptian scholars win prestigious award for energy research
  • Pair recognized in Young Talents from Africa category
  • Awards presented by Italian President Sergio Mattarella in Rome

ROME: Two young Egyptian scholars have been honored with a prestigious Eni Award for their work related to research and technological innovation in the energy sector.

Yousif Adam, of The American University in Cairo, and Ibrahim Mohamed Ibrahim Moustafa Ibrahim, of the Arab Academy for Science, Technology and Maritime Transport, were presented with their prizes by Italian President Sergio Mattarella at a ceremony at Quirinal Palace in Rome.

They were both recognized in the Young Talents from Africa category.

Established in 2007 by the Italian energy company from which they take their name, the Eni Awards are considered an international benchmark for research in energy and the environment.

The aim of the prizes is to promote better use of energy sources and to stimulate the work of new generations of researchers.

Adam’s work was related to sustainable wastewater management in Africa, while Ibrahim proposed a thesis on improving the accuracy of solar energy prediction.


King Charles III in first engagement since queen’s death

King Charles III in first engagement since queen’s death
Updated 03 October 2022

King Charles III in first engagement since queen’s death

King Charles III in first engagement since queen’s death
  • Large crowds turned out on the streets of Dunfermline in Fife, north of Edinburgh, hoping to get a glimpse of the new monarch
  • Charles wore a kilt for the visit and greeted Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and other leaders

LONDON: King Charles III and his wife Camilla, the queen consort, visited Scotland Monday in their first joint public engagement since the royal mourning period to remember Queen Elizabeth II ended.
Large crowds turned out on the streets of Dunfermline in Fife, north of Edinburgh, hoping to get a glimpse of the new monarch. Charles, who wore a kilt for the visit, spent some time shaking hands with well-wishers after he greeted Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and other leaders.
The royal couple were visiting to formally give city status to Dunfermline, the birthplace of another King Charles: Charles I, who reigned in the 17th century before his execution, was the last British monarch born in Scotland.
Dunfermline was among towns that won city status as part of Platinum Jubilee celebrations to mark Elizabeth’s 70 years on the throne.
Later Monday, Charles and Camilla will host a reception for around 300 guests at Edinburgh to celebrate the British South Asian community. The royals will meet British Indians, Pakistanis, and many others and pay tribute to the contributions they made to the UK
Charles became sovereign immediately upon the death of his mother Elizabeth in Balmoral Castle, Scotland, on Sept. 8. Britain held 10 days of national mourning, while the royal family extended the mourning period for a week after the queen’s funeral on Sept. 19.


Top Al-Shabab leader killed in joint operation: Somalia govt

Top Al-Shabab leader killed in joint operation: Somalia govt
Updated 03 October 2022

Top Al-Shabab leader killed in joint operation: Somalia govt

Top Al-Shabab leader killed in joint operation: Somalia govt
  • Abdullahi Yare was one of seven leaders named by the United States on its most-wanted list in 2012

MOGADISHU: The Somali government announced on Monday a top Al-Shabab militant, who had a $3.0-million US bounty on his head, had been killed in a joint air strike in southern Somalia.
The drone strike on October 1, launched by the Somali army and international security partners, killed Abdullahi Yare near the coastal town of Haramka, the ministry of information said in a statement dated Sunday but posted online on Monday.
“This leader... was the head preacher of the group and one of the most notorious members of the Shabab group,” it said.
“He was former head of the Shoura council and the group’s director for finances,” the ministry said, referring to a powerful consultation body within Al-Shabab.
A co-founder of the Al-Qaeda-linked group, Yare was believed to be next in line to take over the leadership of the movement from its ailing chief Ahmed Diriye, according to the ministry.
“His elimination is like a thorn removed from Somalia as a nation,” the ministry said.
Yare was one of seven leaders named by the United States on its most-wanted list in 2012. Washington offered three million dollars for his capture.
The announcement of the strike comes weeks after Somalia’s recently elected President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud vowed to stage all-out war on the jihadists, following a string of deadly attacks. They include a 30-hour hotel siege in the capital, Mogadishu, that killed 21 people.
Mohamud last month urged citizens to stay away from areas controlled by Al-Shabab as he vowed to ratchet up offensives against the militants.
US forces have in the past partnered with African Union soldiers and Somali troops in counterterrorism operations, and have conducted frequent raids and drone strikes on Al-Shabab training camps throughout Somalia.
Last month, the US military said it had killed 27 jihadist fighters in an air strike near Bulobarde, the main town on the road linking Mogadishu to Beledweyne, a key city on the border with Ethiopia.
It said the air strike was carried out “at the request” of the Somali government.
Al-Shabab, which espouses a strict version of sharia or Islamic law, has waged a bloody insurrection against the Mogadishu government for 15 years and remains a potent force despite an African Union operation against the group.
Its fighters were ousted from the capital in 2011 but continue to stage attacks on military, government and civilian targets.
The group last week claimed responsibility for a bomb blast that killed a top Somali police officer near the Al-Shabab-controlled village of Bursa, some 30 kilometers (20 miles) north of Mogadishu.


India scrambles fighter jets after report of bomb scare on flight from Iran

India scrambles fighter jets after report of bomb scare on flight from Iran
Updated 03 October 2022

India scrambles fighter jets after report of bomb scare on flight from Iran

India scrambles fighter jets after report of bomb scare on flight from Iran
  • The air force said it later received information from Iran’s capital Tehran to disregard the bomb scare

NEW DELHI: India’s air force (IAF) said on Monday it had scrambled fighter jets after receiving information of a bomb scare on an airline bearing Iranian registration transiting through Indian airspace.
The air force said it later received information from Iran’s capital Tehran to disregard the bomb scare and the flight continued its journey.
The jets followed the aircraft at a safe distance and the aircraft was offered the option to land at two airports in north-western India.
“However, the pilot declared his unwillingness to divert to either of the two airports,” the IAF said in a statement.
Data from FlightRadar24 showed Mahan Air flight W581, which originated from Tehran and was destined for China’s Guangzhou, fly in circles a handful of times above northern India, west of New Delhi, before continuing to fly across the country and into Myanmar.
An Indian Air Force spokesman did not confirm the flight number for which fighter jets were scrambled.