Middle East to get its first pop-up store for K-Pop band BTS

Middle East to get its first pop-up store for K-Pop band BTS
The first-ever BTS pop-up store in the Middle East is headed to Dubai. (AFP)
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Updated 06 September 2022

Middle East to get its first pop-up store for K-Pop band BTS

Middle East to get its first pop-up store for K-Pop band BTS
  • The pop-up store, first established in October 2019, has been a huge success in other parts of the world, including Toronto and Singapore

DUBAI: The Middle East is getting its first-ever BTS pop-up store, and it is headed to Dubai for three months for the buying pleasure of fans of the biggest K-pop band to have ever existed.

Called “BTS Pop-Up: Space of BTS,” the concept store landing at BurJuman Mall from Sept. 9 to Dec. 8 will feature official merchandise from the world-famous South Korean pop band. Brought to the UAE by Hybe, the record-breaking K-pop group's label, the pop-up, first established in October 2019, has been a huge success in other parts of the world, including Toronto and Singapore.

Only 40 people will be allowed in the store at a time, and fans are not allowed to bring food, drinks or pets.

Apart from merchandise from BTS collections based on hit songs “Black Swan,” “ON,” “Butter” and more, the store will also offer a fan experience through interactive features like BTS-themed photo zones.

There will also be a special area dedicated to “BTS in the Soop,” the reality show starring the band’s seven members.


Arab celebrities star in Hugo Boss’s new campaign 

Arab celebrities star in Hugo Boss’s new campaign 
Updated 27 January 2023

Arab celebrities star in Hugo Boss’s new campaign 

Arab celebrities star in Hugo Boss’s new campaign 

DUBAI: Germany fashion label Hugo Boss has released a star-studded spring/summer 2023 campaign, featuring Arab celebrities. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by BOSS (@boss)

The massive digital campaign features US Palestinian producer DJ Khaled, Dutch Palestinian model Gigi Hadid, Syrian Olympic swimmer Yusra Mardini, Lebanese influencer and entrepreneur Karen Wazen, Emirati host Anas Bukhash, Lebanese-Australian model and humanitarian Jessica Kahawaty and Iraqi para-athlete Zainab Al-Eqabi. 

In the new advert, each of the stars shared a photo collage featuring two images — one from their childhood and one present-day photo while wearing Boss sweatshirts or blazers from the new collection.

According to the brand, the new collection showcases a bold aesthetic, combining a city-inspired spirit with a summery, off-court lifestyle in the brand’s signature color palette of black, white and camel. 

The campaign aims “to inspire the world to live up to its full potential,” the brand’s statement said. “The journey to living life on one’s own terms, begins with finding one’s power, purpose, and perseverance. Despite its highs and lows, twists and turns, the journey is lived with confidence, style, and a forward-looking vision.” 

The campaigns stars celebrities, photographers, entrepreneurs, social advocates and more. Each of the stars will take to their own social media channels to share their inspiring stories.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by BOSS (@boss)

Lensed by Swedish photographer Mikael Jansson, the campaign also stars A-list celebrities, sports personalities and influencers including Demi Lovato, Pairs Hilton, Maluma, Bella Throne, Naomi Campbell, Lee Minho, Khaby Lame, Matteo Berrettini, Anne-Marie, BamBam, Stella Maxwell, Stefflon Don, Macaulay Culkin, Christina, Naomi Watanabe, NikkieTutorials, Cameron Dallas, Aaron Rose Philip, Gottmik, Ox Zung, Nic Kaufmann, Akam, Paola Locatelli, Juanpa Zurita, David Dobrik, Richarlison, Karl-Anthony Towns, Fernando Alonso, Xavi Simons, Aleksander Aamodt Kilde, Suresh Raina, Anthony Santos and Zaire Wade.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by BOSS (@boss)

The stars all tagged their posts: “‘BOSSES AREN’T BORN, THEY’RE MADE’ @boss #beyourownboss.”

“Conviction, effort, and faith in the process. BOSSes aren’t born. They’re made,” the brand shared on its Instagram account. 


Netflix releases first trailer of Gigi Hadid, Tan France’s ‘Next in Fashion’

Netflix releases first trailer of Gigi Hadid, Tan France’s ‘Next in Fashion’
Updated 27 January 2023

Netflix releases first trailer of Gigi Hadid, Tan France’s ‘Next in Fashion’

Netflix releases first trailer of Gigi Hadid, Tan France’s ‘Next in Fashion’

DUBAI: Giant streaming service Netflix on Friday unveiled the first trailer of the second season of “Next in Fashion,” which Part-Palestinian catwalk star Gigi Hadid co-hosts alongside British TV personality Tan France. 

The new season will be released on March 3, Hadid said in her Instagram post. 

“So excited to join Tan France,” she wrote to her 77 million followers. “We had the most special and fun time with these designers and can’t wait for you to meet them!”

 

 

The first season of the fashion competition show, which premiered in January 2020, featured 18 designers who faced weekly design challenges to win a $250,000 prize and a chance to have their collection sold on Net-a-Porter.

This season will feature a group of up-and-coming talents who will compete to win $200,000, and “the chance to share their designs with the world,” the streaming service said. 

 “Hey, hey! Nobody booked you to model, dear,” France tells Hadid, who enters the room twirling as a catwalk star, in the trailer. “You’ve got an actual job to do.”

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid)

 

The short trailer shows separate scenes of Hadid speaking to the designers. “Are you guys ready?” she said in one clip, while in another she motivated the competitors saying: “Fashion should be fun.” 

In another scene, she was seen wearing her iconic red Versace skintight catsuit that consisted of a leather corset paired with pointed-toe knee-high boots and a voluminous, billowing red coat, which she wore to the Met Gala in 2022. 

“Tanny?” she says. “I’m gonna need some help getting down from here.” 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid)

 

 Hadid first announced that she will take part in the new season in February 2022. 

“Netflix is casting designers now for season 2. I know there are many designers out there that deserve a platform like this. Second-guessing yourself? Please just go for it. This is your sign and your chance. Show us your creations,” she told her followers at the time, sharing a poster that featured her and France.

Filming for the show began in April 2022, according to the model. 

Hadid took to Instagram to share her excitement over the forthcoming episodes at the time and talk about her co-host, calling the British reality television star her “brother” and saying that shooting the new show together has been “a joy of my life.”

France also lauded his “Next in Fashion” co-host and dubbed her an “amazing mom.”


Iraqi-American painter Vian Sora’s work finds the beauty in decay

Iraqi-American painter Vian Sora’s work finds the beauty in decay
Updated 27 January 2023

Iraqi-American painter Vian Sora’s work finds the beauty in decay

Iraqi-American painter Vian Sora’s work finds the beauty in decay

DUBAI: March 2023 will mark the 20th anniversary of US-led invasion of Iraq, which led to destruction, displacement, and prolonged political instability. One of the millions who witnessed the chaos unfold is the Iraqi-American painter Vian Sora. “There is nothing that I don’t remember,” she says from her atelier in Louisville, Kentucky. 

On the night before the bombing began, Sora, who is of Kurdish origin, drove with her family from Baghdad to the town of Balad Ruz, around 120 kilometers away. “It was so visceral and scary,” she tells Arab News. “We all lived in just one house there — 30 of us slept in one room. We watched the B-52’s bomb Baghdad.”

Vian Sora, Hanging Gardens, 2022. Oil and mixed media on canvas 70 x 55 in (177.8 x 139.7 cm). (Supplied)

Sora was born in Baghdad in 1976, three years before Saddam Hussein came to power in Iraq, changing the course of political affairs in the Middle East. “Really, ever since I was a child, there was war and bombing,” she says.

Amid all the unrest, however, Sora discovered a passion for art. Her mother’s family owned a prominent auction business in Baghdad, where modernists like Faiq Hassan and Shakir Hassan Al-Said gathered, and Sora says she read as much as possible growing up about the Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid, in particular. “This was what (was) around,” she recalls. “I grew up in this kind of dreamy world that was parallel to the bombing.” 

Sora is of Kurdish origins. (Supplied)

In 2006, Sora left Iraq through the Kurdish/Turkish border, ending up in Istanbul. From there, she moved to the UK, the UAE and finally, the US, where she arrived in 2009. She hasn’t been back to Iraq since leaving, and says it was not an easy transition to life in the country that had invaded her own. 

“It was a culture shock. I felt like I always had to dumb down who I am to be accepted, but I also met some amazing people who supported me and my practice,” she says. “They were so hungry to learn more about us. I feel like I don’t just represent Iraq, I represent the whole region.” 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Vian Sora (@viansora)

The experience of surviving “29 years of war” has definitely seeped into Sora’s expressive canvases, housed in private and public collections in Iraq, the US, France, and Turkey. “Iraq affects everything in my work; it’s my DNA,” she says. “Once you’ve lived through the first three decades of your life in a country like Iraq, witnessing four or five wars, that cannot leave you.” 

The self-taught artist tries to leave that which she has endured in the background, like “a dead grandmother who protects you,” she says. Her work is inspired by both her own life and by global issues such as climate change and cultural destruction. She quotes what the German artist Anselm Kiefer once said about the role of an artist: To observe and do the work. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Vian Sora (@viansora)

She describes her large paintings, inspired by Middle Eastern history and aesthetics, as a form of ‘gestural abstraction.’ They are full of rich colors, floating shapes, dreamlike landscapes, and curious figures. There are portrayals of chaos, explosions, life and death — and of the moment after death, reaching the sublime. Decay, and seeing the beauty in it, is Sora’s obsession. 

“It’s an equivalent of my own life,” she says. “I feel like, the older we get, the more refined we’re supposed to be. I feel the decay that has happened within me is equivalent to the physical decay I see in artworks and palaces. We persevere through certain things, or we fail. We might be destroyed in the process, and that’s what interests me.”    

The physical act of painting is a way of staying whole. “I come to the studio super-early in the morning, shut the world off and put on my music. I’m immersed in that moment. It’s the best feeling,” she says. It is also a way of dealing with her post-traumatic stress disorder, caused by escaping near-death experiences. 

“The only way to get it out of me somehow, or to work with this, is to continuously repeat that feeling,” she explains. “In the end, I don’t want the work to be about death or terribleness. It will be, somehow, but I also want to create elements of beauty.” 


French Algerian actress Lyna Khoudri nominated at Cesar Awards 

French Algerian actress Lyna Khoudri nominated at Cesar Awards 
Updated 26 January 2023

French Algerian actress Lyna Khoudri nominated at Cesar Awards 

French Algerian actress Lyna Khoudri nominated at Cesar Awards 

DUBAI: French Algerian actress Lyna Khoudri has been nominated in the Best Supporting Actress category at the 48th Cesar Awards, France’s equivalent of the Oscars. 

Khoudri has been nominated for her role in filmmaker Cedric Jimenez's “Novembre,” which tells the story of the terrorist attacks in Paris on the night of Nov. 13, 2015. She plays Samia, a charitable young woman who volunteers at a homeless camp. Her flat mate is bankrolling her cousin, one of the terrorists. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by lynakhoudri (@lynakhoudri)

The actress is no stranger to starring in films based on real-life incidents. In November 2022, she premiered “Nos Frangins” or “Our Brothers.” The movie tells the harrowing true story of French Algerian student Malik Oussekine who died in police custody in 1986 following several weeks of student protests against a university reform bill. Khoudri plays the role of his sister. 

Meanwhile, Louis Garrel’s “The Innocent” and Dominik Moll’s thriller “The Night of the 12th” are leading the race at the Cesar Awards, with 11 and 10 nods, respectively. 


Saudi-helmed Ashi Studio, Syrian designer Rami Al-Ali showcase new designs in Paris 

Saudi-helmed Ashi Studio, Syrian designer Rami Al-Ali showcase new designs in Paris 
Updated 26 January 2023

Saudi-helmed Ashi Studio, Syrian designer Rami Al-Ali showcase new designs in Paris 

Saudi-helmed Ashi Studio, Syrian designer Rami Al-Ali showcase new designs in Paris 

DUBAI: Saudi designer Mohammed Ashi, founder of Beirut-based label Ashi Studio, and Syrian designer Rami Al-Ali showcased their newest collections this week in Paris.  

Ashi’s new collection is called “Moon and Dust.”  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ashi Studio (@ashistudio)

The creations include glitzy gowns that mirror the sparkling night sky. Some of his new ensembles had voluminous, structured fabric around the waist and shoulders.   

The dresses came in white, beige and black hues.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ashi Studio (@ashistudio)

He treated fans who were not able to attend the presentation to a 14-minute video of the show published on his website.   

Some of his Grecian style dresses featured draped silhouettes and others had feathers in gold. (Getty Images)

Meanwhile, Al-Ali presented a pastel-colored collection that was inspired by the Golden Fleece, one of Greek mythology’s oldest fables. 

Some of his Grecian style dresses featured draped silhouettes and others had feathers in gold.