BBC Radio 4’s ‘Today’ program appoints Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe as guest editor

BBC Radio 4’s ‘Today’ program appoints Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe as guest editor
Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe speaks at a media conference in London. (AFP/File)
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Updated 28 November 2022

BBC Radio 4’s ‘Today’ program appoints Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe as guest editor

BBC Radio 4’s ‘Today’ program appoints Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe as guest editor
  • Her show will feature reports on Iran, examine government efforts to free British prisoners

DUBAI: British-Iranian citizen Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who spent six years jailed in Iran, has been chosen as one of seven guest editors of BBC Radio 4’s “Today” program, as part of BBC Radio and BBC Sounds Christmas plans.

In an annual tradition, for the last 19 years, the program has invited high-profile guests to take over the show in the week between Christmas and new year.

Owenna Griffiths, editor of the “Today” program, said: “For nearly 20 years the guest editors have transformed Christmas on ‘Today,’ creating some of the most memorable moments in the program’s rich history along the way.

“This year is no different and I’m enormously grateful these guest editors have given up their time to bring new stories, unexpected perspectives, and a little festive cheer to the ‘Today’ audience.”

Each guest will edit Radio 4’s “Today” program between Dec. 26 and Jan. 2 and each show will include an interview with the guest editor.

Zaghari-Ratcliffe was held in an Iranian prison after being accused of spying in 2016.

Following a long-running campaign and negotiations between the British and Iranian governments, she returned home to the UK in March.

In September, she posted a video showing her support for the ongoing protests in Iran following the death in custody of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini.

In the clip, Zaghari-Ratcliffe is seen cutting her hair and it ends with her saying, “for my mother, for my daughter, for the fear of solitary confinement, for the women of my country, for freedom.”

Her show on Dec. 28 will explore how people can hold onto their freedom in difficult times and feature reports about Iran and the UK government’s efforts to free British prisoners.

Other guest editors include ABBA member Bjorn Ulvaeus; chef Jamie Oliver; Jeremy Fleming, director of the UK’s intelligence, cyber, and security agency Government Communications Headquarters; Sharon White, chairman of John Lewis Partnership; former cricketer Ian Botham, now a member of the British House of Lords and UK trade envoy to Australia; and Anne-Marie Imafidon, technologist, author, and chief executive officer of Stemettes, a social enterprise promoting women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers.


Backlash for Charlie Hebdo cartoon mocking Turkiye earthquake

Backlash for Charlie Hebdo cartoon mocking Turkiye earthquake
Updated 2 min 11 sec ago

Backlash for Charlie Hebdo cartoon mocking Turkiye earthquake

Backlash for Charlie Hebdo cartoon mocking Turkiye earthquake
  • The magazine shared on the day of the quake a drawing gloating over the death of thousands
  • Commentators described the cartoon as "racist" and "vile"

LONDON: A cartoon scoffing at the deadly earthquake that has killed more than 11,000 people in Turkiye and Syria has received a severe backlash online for its insensitivity.

French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo published a cartoon captioned “drawing of the day” and showing collapsed buildings and piles of rubble with “earthquake in Turkiye” written on top and “no need to send tanks” at the bottom, sparking outrage on social media as well as criticism from journalists.

Many deemed the cartoon “racist” and “vile,” condemning it for mocking the pain of thousands of innocent victims.

“Just vile, racist, and immensely insensitive,” tweeted Islamophobia scholar Khaled Beydoun.

“It is really disgusting to make fun of the suffering of others and far from the ethics of journalism, assuming it sticks to it, and I doubt it,” wrote Abdulla Al-Amadi in a tweet.

Lebanese journalist Giselle Khoury described the cartoon as “shameful,” demanding the magazine explain how this constituted “freedom of expression.”

Rana Abi Jomaa, also a Lebanese journalist, wrote that “there are no limits to Charlie Hebdo’s racism,” wondering “who would defend this abhorrent satirical French magazine after today?”

“Charlie Hebdo is faithful to its famous hate speech, bigotry, mediocre unethical journalism and colonialist scorn,” wrote Tunisian journalist Mourad Teyeb. “Nothing to do with press freedom!”

Khalil Rammal, on social media, denounced the magazine’s “racist” cartoon, namely for “gloating over” the tragedy of thousands.

Challenging the outrageous cartoon, Ouissal Harize shared a video of a rescued toddler who lost his family in the catastrophe, and wrote: “This is the tragedy you are mocking.” 

Another user, Shireen Mazari, wrote: “Hatred and Islamophobia at its peak when a natural disaster draws this kind of reaction from Charlie Hebdo! Sickening to the core.”

Commentators recounted the Jan. 7, 2015, attack on Charlie Hebdo’s headquarters in Paris, reminding the magazine of its demand for global support under the slogan “Je suis Charlie.”

“Mocking a natural disaster with the death of thousands and the complete destruction of infrastructure in an already fragile state with ‘didn't even need to send tanks’ is everything I need to know about ‘Je suis Charlie.’ Inhumane,” wrote Twitter user Yasmeen.

Political analyst Oznur Sirene reminded the magazine of how many Turks showed solidarity following the 2015 attack, only to be rewarded with mockery.

“Today you dare mock the suffering of an entire people,” she wrote. “One must really have some nerve to do this while there are still babies waiting to be rescued.”

Others condemned the magazine for “having a history of mocking victims of catastrophe,” with several resharing the cartoon that made fun of Italy’s earthquake in 2016.

Charlie Hebdo received a backlash for a cartoon it shared in September 2016 mocking the victims of the 6.2 magnitude earthquake that hit Italy at the time. Shortly after, the magazine shared another cartoon demonizing critics.

In January 2016 the magazine published a cartoon making fun of Alan Kurdi, the Syrian child whose body was found on a Greek beach in 2015. 

People in Turkiye and Syria woke up on Monday to a deadly magnitude 7.8 earthquake, which killed more than 11,000 people, according to CNN, and destroyed thousands of buildings.

Syria’s devastated infrastructure and freezing weather conditions are obstructing rescue operations, which have been ongoing since the disaster struck.


Twitter restricted in quake-hit Turkiye

Twitter restricted in quake-hit Turkiye
Updated 08 February 2023

Twitter restricted in quake-hit Turkiye

Twitter restricted in quake-hit Turkiye
  • Platform has been widely used to seek help and establish personal contact
  • Turkish authorities have limited access to social media during previous national emergencies

LONDON: Twitter is facing restrictions in Turkiye as the country struggles to deal with the aftermath of the devastating earthquake, sources reported.

Independent global internet monitor NetBlocks confirmed that the social media platform has been restricted on multiple network providers, including TTNet and Turkcell, on Wednesday.

“Real-time network data show Twitter has been restricted in Turkiye,” Netblocks said in a tweet.

“The filtering is applied on major internet providers and comes as the public come to rely on the service in the aftermath of a series of deadly earthquakes.”

Twitter is widely adopted in the country and its restriction disrupts critical communication for rescue efforts.

NetBlocks Director Alp Toker said that this is the first time the company detected social media restrictions during a natural disaster.

“Twitter has been in use extensively in the aftermath of the earthquakes, both to seek assistance and rescue equipment and by those trying to get back in touch with loved ones,” Toker said.

Turkish authorities have not given any formal explanations, but NetBlocks said that Turkiye often acts to prevent alleged disinformation during national emergencies.

In November, following a terrorist attack in central Istanbul that killed six people and injured more than 80, authorities imposed a 10-hour social media ban.

Some users also reported that TikTok might have been affected by the restrictions.

In a statement, the video-sharing app said it was aware of the technical difficulties and is “investigating the matter and hope access is restored as soon as possible as platforms like TikTok remain a critical way to stay in touch during crises.”

NetBlocks and some Twitter users have reported that users in Turkiye can still access the platforms through VPNs.


Dubai Lynx launches Young Lynx Academy in partnership with Publicis Groupe

Dubai Lynx launches Young Lynx Academy in partnership with Publicis Groupe
Updated 08 February 2023

Dubai Lynx launches Young Lynx Academy in partnership with Publicis Groupe

Dubai Lynx launches Young Lynx Academy in partnership with Publicis Groupe
  • Hosted over 3 days, program will feature keynote talks, workshops, competition
  • Dubai Lynx festival director Thea Skelton: We are seeing an increasing number of agencies from KSA enter and win at Dubai Lynx

DUBAI: The Dubai Lynx International Festival of Creativity has launched the Young Lynx Academy in partnership with multinational advertising company Publicis Groupe.

Aimed at mentoring young professionals in the Middle East and North Africa region, the academy will run from March 12 to 14.

Thea Skelton, festival director of Dubai Lynx, told Arab News: “As we know, the region is using creativity as a driving force for growth.

“We are seeing an increasing number of agencies from KSA enter and win at Dubai Lynx and it’s very exciting for us to watch young talent from the Kingdom grow.”

The academy is designed to support young talent within the creative communications sector by offering them a free mentorship opportunity.

Hosted over three days, the program will include keynote talks, workshops, and a 24-hour hack competition involving participants working on a charity brief.

Skelton said: “Creativity is a key part of Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030 plan, and the training and development of young people in this sector is very much a part of this.

“We’re excited to see how young creatives from Saudi Arabia will perform this year and pave the way for many more people from the region to excel,” she added.

The academy will be open to professionals aged 30 or younger who have worked for a minimum of one year in the creative, media, digital, or social sectors in the MENA region. Successful applicants will also receive tickets to attend the festival and Lynx party on March 14.

The deadline for entries is Feb. 27. More details are available on the Young Lynx Academy website at https://www.dubailynx.com/talent-and-training/young-lynx-academy


Meta, nonprofit end US lawsuit over infinity-logo trademark

Meta, nonprofit end US lawsuit over infinity-logo trademark
Updated 08 February 2023

Meta, nonprofit end US lawsuit over infinity-logo trademark

Meta, nonprofit end US lawsuit over infinity-logo trademark
  • Lawsuit by Dfinity Foundation said Meta would cause confusion with its infinity logo

LONDON: Meta Platforms Inc and blockchain nonprofit Dfinity Foundation have resolved Dfinity’s trademark lawsuit against Meta over its infinity-symbol logo, according to a joint filing in San Francisco federal court.

Meta and Dfinity asked the court Monday to dismiss the case with prejudice, which means it cannot be revived.

A Meta spokesperson said Tuesday that the company was “pleased with the outcome of the case.” It said Dfinity had dropped the lawsuit after Meta “pointed out the defects” in its revised complaint.

Representatives for Dfinity did not immediately respond to a request for comment Tuesday.

Switzerland-based Dfinity’s Internet Computer is an “infinite” public blockchain network designed to host smart contracts. Dfinity sued Meta last year, alleging the logo Meta adopted after changing its name from Facebook would cause confusion with Dfinity’s infinity-symbol trademarks.

Meta has described its logo as a “continuous loop” that resembles both the letter ‘M’ and an infinity sign to symbolize “infinite horizons in the metaverse.”

US District Judge Charles Breyer dismissed Dfinity’s original complaint in November but allowed the company to amend the lawsuit. Breyer said Meta’s logo was unlikely to cause consumer confusion, citing differences in the logos’ designs and the fact that Dfinity’s customers are “tech-savvy developers.”

Dfinity filed an amended complaint in December.

Meta is still facing trademark lawsuits from virtual-reality company MetaX and investment firm Metacapital over its name change.


YouTube collaborates with Egypt’s National Council for Women on Safer Internet Day

YouTube collaborates with Egypt’s National Council for Women on Safer Internet Day
Updated 08 February 2023

YouTube collaborates with Egypt’s National Council for Women on Safer Internet Day

YouTube collaborates with Egypt’s National Council for Women on Safer Internet Day
  • National council 1st Egyptian entity to enrol in YouTube’s Trusted Flagger program
  • NCW will provide tailored workshops for content creators focused on creating content that is sensitive to women’s needs

DUBAI: YouTube has partnered with the National Council for Women in Egypt to introduce a series of initiatives aimed at promoting a safer experience for women using the platform and encouraging more female content creators to share their stories.

Announced on Safer Internet Day, Feb. 7, the collaboration includes a series of workshops and meet-ups to set up a community of content creators, YouTube experts, and representatives from the NCW.

Council president, Dr. Maya Morsy, said the organization was pleased to partner with YouTube, “especially in light of what women suffer from exposure to various types of cyberviolence via social media that have become an open space for people to engage in violence against women.”

She noted that in recent years, Egypt had been taking steps to introduce legislation that protected women from all forms of violence.

“We are proud to encourage more women content creators and support them to develop their skills, to further understand women’s issues, and promote meaningful and useful content,” she added.

The workshops, which will take place throughout the year, aim to help more women content creators benefit from available resources to grow their channels, and learn about the different tools and features to stay safe online.

NCW will provide tailored workshops for content creators focused on creating content that is sensitive to women’s needs, raising awareness about women’s empowerment, and staying safe from cyberviolence against women and girls.

The workshops will also feature sessions focused on #IamRemarkable, a Google initiative that aims to empower women and other under-represented groups celebrate their achievements.

As part of the collaboration, the NCW will become the first entity in Egypt to enrol in YouTube’s Trusted Flagger program, which allows government bodies and non-profit organizations to directly report content to YouTube and have visibility on the decisions made.

Tarek Amin, director of YouTube partnerships in the Middle East and North Africa region, said: “Together, we aim to continue developing a safe experience for women creators in Egypt by equipping them with the skills needed and inviting them to join a wider support circle of other content creators and experts of the platform.”