Summer cinema: The blockbusters coming your way over the next few months

Summer cinema: The blockbusters coming your way over the next few months
‘Bad Boys: Ride or Die.’ (Supplied) 
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Updated 24 May 2024
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Summer cinema: The blockbusters coming your way over the next few months

Summer cinema: The blockbusters coming your way over the next few months

DUBAI: Here are eight blockbusters coming your way over the next few months.

‘Deadpool & Wolverine’ 

Director: Shawn Levy 

Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Hugh Jackman, Emma Corrin 

Release date: July 26 

In what will likely be the summer’s biggest box-office draw, the now-retired Wade Wilson — aka the indestructible mercenary Deadpool — is pulled from his sedate existence by the Time Variance Authority and forced into carrying out a mission with fellow anti-hero Wolverine, of X-Men fame. Both men reluctantly engage in a task that “will change the history of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.” 

‘Hit Man’ 

Director: Richard Linklater 

Starring: Glen Powell, Adria Arjona, Austin Amelio 

Release date: May 24 (June 7, Netflix) 

Action-comedy from one of the best directors around. Gary Johnson (Powell, who co-wrote the movie with Linklater) is a straight-laced college professor who moonlights as a fake hitman to entrap criminals for the local police department. But when he falls for a prospective client, Madisson (Arjona), Gary gets in way above his head, and his lies start to catch up with him. The bizarre premise is actually based on a true story (although Linklater has stressed that his film is not a faithful recreation of events).  

‘Bad Boys: Ride or Die’ 

Directors: Adil & Bilall 

Starring: Will Smith, Martin Lawrence, Vanessa Hudgens 

Release date: June 7 

Detectives Mike Lowrey (Smith) and Marcus Burnett (Lawrence) are back for a fourth big-screen outing. This time, they’re investigating their own, when their late captain is accused of having been working with drug cartels. The two men set out to clear their captain’s name and find out who in the Miami PD could be responsible for framing him, only to be set up themselves and forced to go on the run. 

‘Inside Out 2’ 

Director: Kelsey Mann 

Starring: Amy Poehler, Phyllis Smith, Lewis Black 

Release date: June 14 

The sequel to Pixar’s much-loved “Inside Out” — about a young girl called Riley and the five personified emotions that determine her thoughts and actions — finds Riley entering her teenage years, and ushering in some new emotions (Anxiety, Ennui, Embarrassment and Envy) who throw off the delicate equilibrium achieved by the veterans Joy, Sadness, Anger, Fear and Disgust. 

‘The Bikeriders’ 

Director: Jeff Nichols 

Starring: Jodie Comer, Austin Butler, Tom Hardy 

Release date: June 21 

Nichols’ tale of the exploits of the fictional Chicago-based biker gang the Outlaws MC over the course of the 1960s is inspired by the photo-book of the same name by Danny Lyon. What, at first, is intended as a place of refuge and sanctuary for local outsiders where they can feel free to be themselves evolves — or devolves — into a violent crime organization.  

‘Despicable Me 4’ 

Director: Chris Renaud 

Voice cast: Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig, Pierre Coffin 

Release date: July 3 

Gru — once a supervillain, now an agent for good — is living happily with his wife (and fellow agent) Lucy, their three adopted daughters, and their newborn baby boy. But when Maxime Le Mal, the dangerous criminal that Gru helped put away, escapes from prison, Gru and his family (and, of course, his Minions) must go on the run. 

‘Fly Me to the Moon’ 

Director: Greg Berlanti 

Starring: Scarlett Johansson, Channing Tatum, Anna Garcia 

Release date: July 12 

Set in the Space Race of the 1960s, Berlanti’s romantic comedy-drama finds NASA director Cole Davis preparing for the launch of Apollo 11. An already stressful situation is made worse when he falls for marketing specialist Kelly Jones, whom the government has appointed to stage a fake moon landing in case anything goes wrong with the real deal.   

‘Borderlands’ 

Director: Eli Roth 

Starring: Cate Blanchett, Kevin Hart, Jack Black 

Release date: August 9 

With video-game adaptations no longer the dross they used to be, thanks to the success of TV shows like “The Last of Us” and “Fallout,” hopes are high for this star-studded take on Gearbox Software’s all-action looter-shooter. Blanchett plays Lillith — a much-feared outlaw who returns to her home planet of Pandora on a mission to find the missing daughter of the universe’s most powerful man, Atlas. To achieve her goal, she teams up with a band of misfits to tackle monsters and bandits and find the girl. 


Recipes for success: Chef Thomas Jean-Paul Pascal Colette offers advice and a special salad recipe

Recipes for success: Chef Thomas Jean-Paul Pascal Colette offers advice and a special salad recipe
Updated 17 sec ago
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Recipes for success: Chef Thomas Jean-Paul Pascal Colette offers advice and a special salad recipe

Recipes for success: Chef Thomas Jean-Paul Pascal Colette offers advice and a special salad recipe

DUBAI: French chef Thomas Jean-Paul Pascal Colette has worked in Michelin-starred kitchens in Paris and influential eateries in Moscow. He is now chef de cuisine at The St. Regis Red Sea Resort’s overwater restaurant Tilina.  

Colette says his grandmother, also a chef, was the inspiration behind his passion for cooking. “I always helped her, and it became quite natural that, when I was around, like, 12, if I was alone at home, I would try to cook something for myself, or for my family,” he tells Arab News. 

Here, he discusses common kitchen mistakes, annoying customers, tips for amateur chefs and shares a special salad recipe. 

Tilina at The St. Regis Red Sea Resort. (Supplied)

When you started out, what was the most common mistake you made? 

Seasoning. I started out in a Michelin-starred restaurant, and there, it wasn’t just salt and pepper. It was all about the balance in the dish, so you also need to think about the acidity and things like that. So at the beginning it was quite complicated. Every time my chef tried something I made, he was, like, “No, it’s not good. It’s missing this, this and that.” 

What’s your top tip for amateur chefs? 

Don’t be scared to experiment, and don’t be scared to fail, because, actually, many great dishes came from failure. So try and enjoy it — that’s what cooking is all about. 

What one ingredient can instantly improve any dish? 

Many chefs will say it’s love — because you need to care about and love what you are doing. But for me, it’s salt. Seasoning is so important. Even if you have the best ingredients, if you don’t season them, they’ll lack flavor.  

When you go out to eat, do you find yourself critiquing the food?  

No. Even if there’s something wrong, I would never tell the chef. If I see a mistake on the service side, or if there is food I don’t like, I would just try and learn from it to prevent my own customers from experiencing it. 

Tilina at The St. Regis Red Sea Resort. (Supplied)

What’s your favorite cuisine?  

It’s really about the chef, not the cuisine. If I want to go to a restaurant, then I’ll find a chef that I want to try, so it will be either be a set menu or his signature dish. And when I go back to France, I have to have a nice steak tartare. 

What’s your go-to dish if you have to cook something quickly at home? 

Pasta. You can play with it so much — you can make it with fish, with meat, with vegetables… Boil some water, put some pasta in, and see what you have in the fridge: maybe some shrimp, some tomato, a little bit of garlic and parsley. That’s perfect. 

What customer behavior most annoys you? 

Asking to change an ingredient in a dish. When I make a dish, it’s all about the balance. So, if you take out one ingredient, then the idea behind the dish doesn’t make sense anymore. I really try to avoid doing this. I’ll go and talk with the guest, and rather than change the dish, maybe try to do something special for them, something else that they would like. 

What is your favorite dish to cook? 

Seafood. This was my childhood in Normandy: When the sea was low on Sundays, we would go and pick up fresh fish. We’d go back home and cook them very simply, with a little bit of garlic, parsley, cream, and that’s it. So seafood always reminds me of this time. 

As a head chef, what are you like? Are you strict? 

You can’t run a kitchen without discipline, everyone needs to be focused during service. But, I don’t believe that discipline comes from shouting, it comes from mutual respect.  

Chef Thomas’ Red Sea Salad recipe 

INGREDIENTS: 

500g heirloom tomatoes; 3 Carabineros prawns; 10g chives; 10g salmon roe; 5g gelatine leaves; 1 egg yolk; 100g grapeseed oil or sunflower oil; 10g olive oil; 1 lemon; 50g parsley (leaves)  

INSTRUCTIONS: 

For the tomato jelly  

1. Process 250g of tomatoes in a blender. Once the mixture becomes smooth, strain it through a cheesecloth. 

2. Place the gelatine leaves in cold water. 

3. Take 50g of the tomato mixture and heat to 50° C. Add the gelatine, let it melt and then add the rest of the tomato mix. 

4. Pour 80g of it into each of three bowls and place in refrigerator. 

For the tomato tartare  

1. Boil 1L of water. 

2. Using a small knife, make a small cross at the bottom of the remaining tomatoes. 

3. Put the tomatoes in the boiling water for 10 seconds, then put them in iced water, remove the skin and dry them with a paper towel. 

4. Cut the tomatoes into four, remove the insides to get tomato petals. (Keep the insides for later, they can be used for a sauce.) 

5. Chop the tomato petals into cubes of 0.5mm. 

6. Finely chop the chives. 

7. Mix the tomatoes and chives with 5g olive oil, the juice of half a lemon, and salt, then place in the refrigerator. 

For the marinated prawns  

1. Clean the prawns. (Tip: If you keep the heads and the shell they can be used in a sauce or soup later). 

2. Chop the prawns in 1cm cubes. 

3. Mix the prawns with 5g olive oil, the juice of half a lemon, and lemon zest. Let them marinate for 10 minutes.  

For the parsley mayo  

1. Warm up 100g of grapeseed oil to 72°C, then pour it into blender with parsley leaves and mix for two minutes. 

2. Strain the mixture through a cheesecloth. 

3. Put 1 egg yolk, salt and pepper in a bowl and whisk while slowly adding the parsley oil. 

Plating  

1. Take your plates of jelly out of the refrigerator 

2. Place a circular disc on the jelly and put 1.5cm of tomatoes and 1.5cm of marinated prawn inside. Remove the circle. 

3. Finish with a few dots of parsley mayo and a few dots of salmon roe. 


Highlights from artist Maisara Baroud’s ‘I’m Still Alive’ exhibition

Highlights from artist Maisara Baroud’s ‘I’m Still Alive’ exhibition
Updated 7 min 57 sec ago
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Highlights from artist Maisara Baroud’s ‘I’m Still Alive’ exhibition

Highlights from artist Maisara Baroud’s ‘I’m Still Alive’ exhibition

DUBAI: Here are three highlights from Maisara Baroud’s ‘I’m Still Alive,’ which runs at Zawyeh Gallery in Ramallah until June 23. 

‘I’m Still Alive No. 1’ 

In the early days of the ongoing Israeli military assault on his hometown of Gaza, artist Maisara Baroud lost both his home and his studio. So he took to drawing a diary, which he has continued as the devastating violence continues, “to tell my friends that I am still alive.” This exhibition sees artists including Mohammad Sabaaneh recreating Baroud’s works in Ramallah. 

‘I’m Still Alive No. 3’ 

“To declare that Maisara is still alive is a declaration that we are all still alive too,” Sabaaneh said in a statement. “So, we don’t become neutral in this genocidal war targeting and annihilating Palestinians physically and spiritually, we decided to participate in re-drawing Maisara’s paintings in Ramallah, playing the same role of a prisoner smuggling another prisoner’s paintings out of prison.” 

‘I’m Still Alive No. 5’ 

On June 23, Baroud’s works will be wiped from the walls, “highlighting the project’s impermanence and the transient nature of the war, hoping for an end to the occupation nightmare one day, as “no condition is permanent,’” the organizers stated. “The exhibition serves as a tribute to Baroud and Palestinians in Gaza.”  


The best TV shows of 2024 so far 

The best TV shows of 2024 so far 
Updated 20 June 2024
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The best TV shows of 2024 so far 

The best TV shows of 2024 so far 
  • From warlords in feudal Japan, through post-apocalyptic wastelands, to a stalker in Scotland

‘Baby Reindeer’ 

Richard Gadd’s autobiographical drama is the most talked-about show of the year, though not always for the reasons its creator — or Netflix — would have wanted. The streaming giant is almost certainly regretting the “This is a true story” splash at the start of the series, when adding “based on” could have saved them at least some of the cash it will likely lose in lawsuits from the real-life people that the too-easily-cracked characterizations have exposed. But the legal and ethical fallout shouldn’t overshadow the fact that Gadd’s painfully honest depiction of a wannabe comedian (himself) and his relationship with an unhinged female stalker is original, compelling, infuriating, and sometimes, at least in the early episodes, as funny as it is horrifying. And Jessica Gunning, as the stalker, Martha, turns in an extraordinary performance that should earn her a slew of awards. 

‘Fallout’ 

An adaptation of a post-apocalyptic video game was one of 2023’s finest shows (“The Last of Us”) and, thanks to “Fallout,” the same will likely be said for 2024. But the two shows — like the two games — are vastly different. Yes, “The Last of Us” had monsters in it, but it was largely grounded in gritty realism. “Fallout” is far more cartoonish, both in its aesthetic and its violence. It’s set in an alternate history in which a nuclear exchange between the US and China in 2077 drove many survivors underground into bunkers known as Vaults. More than two centuries later, a young woman, Lucy, leaves her Vault and ventures into the wasteland that used to be Los Angeles to hunt for her father, who has been kidnapped by raiders. Having been raised in the safety and the — ostensibly — polite society of the Vault, Lucy is woefully unprepared for the horrors that await her in the outside world.  

‘Ripley’ 

The plot of Steven Zaillian’s adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s psychological crime thriller novel “The Talented Mr. Ripley” is fairly straightforward: Tom Ripley (the excellent Andrew Scott), a down-on-his-luck con-man in 1960s New York, is hired by the wealthy Herbert Greenleaf to convince his wayward son Dickie to return home from Italy, where he is living a leisurely life at his father’s expense. But Ripley sees a chance to transform his life — if he’s willing to cross some serious boundaries. Zaillian draws out the suspense with lingering shots of the Italian seaside town where Dickie is living and long sections without dialogue, carried by Scott’s commanding performance. The anomaly of shooting the series in black-and-white only helps it stand out all the more.   

‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ 

Farewell, then, Larry David. Or at least the version of Larry David that anchored this brilliant largely improvised sit-com over 12 series and 24 years. In this final season, Larry doesn’t suddenly see the light and transform into a decent human being. Instead David continued to find new ways for his misanthropic character to make us laugh and cringe in equal measure. The final episode is titled “No Lessons Learned.” That’s all you need to know, and all fans would have wanted. 

‘Shogun’ 

Kudos to FX and Hulu for making a success of a show that, the majority of the time, is in Japanese. John Blackthorne, the hero of this historical drama adapted from James Clavell’s 1975 novel, is loosely based on the English navigator William Adams, who became a samurai for the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate in the early 17th century. The show’s beautifully paced mix of political intrigue and brutal combat is compelling viewing. 

‘True Detective: Night Country’ 

With a female showrunner, Issa Lopez, and two female leads (Jodie Foster as detective Liz Danvers, Kali Reis as Trooper Evangeline Navarro), the fourth season of the anthology series naturally enraged online trolls. But this tale of the simultaneous disappearance of eight scientists living at the Tsalal Arctic Research Station in the small town of Ennis, Alaska, during the winter period when the sun never rises is immediately gripping. Lopez leans into the supernatural horror elements that were an undercurrent of the acclaimed first series, and Foster and Reis are a badass double act.  

‘Masters of the Air’ 

Executive producers Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks signed off from their trilogy of miniseries based on the events of World War II (from an American point of view) in spectacular fashion with this show focused on the Eighth Air Force, which was engaged in some of the war’s most-dangerous missions in Northern Europe. “This is not a narratively complex beast, replete with twists and turns,” our reviewer wrote. “Rather, it’s a show that seems to belong to a bygone era: a lovingly made, epic chronicle of remarkable people doing remarkable things during remarkable times.” 

‘Mr & Mrs. Smith’ 

When it was announced that “Fleabag” creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge had walked away from this spy series (loosely) based on the 2005 film starring Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, which she was meant to be co-creating and starring in with “Atlanta” creator Donald Glover, there were fears the show would flop. Instead, Waller-Bridge’s replacement, the Japanese-American actress Maya Erskine, is excellent as the Jane Smith to Glover’s John Smith, matching her partner’s easy onscreen charisma all the way and giving the show a grounded heart around which to base its often-outlandish storylines. “Mr & Mrs. Smith” was a lot of fun.  


Recipes for success: Chef Yann Lohez offers advice and a tasty tomato salad recipe 

Recipes for success: Chef Yann Lohez offers advice and a tasty tomato salad recipe 
Updated 20 June 2024
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Recipes for success: Chef Yann Lohez offers advice and a tasty tomato salad recipe 

Recipes for success: Chef Yann Lohez offers advice and a tasty tomato salad recipe 

DUBAI: French chef Yann Lohez has spent 15 years working in five-star hotels across the world, with stints at the Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi, Geneva’s Kempinski Hotel, the Evian Resort in France and now The St. Regis Riyadh, where he is the executive chef.  

His passion for cooking began in the quaint countryside school where his mother cooked for 80 children. 

“Every morning, during the break between classes, my classmates would ask me to go to the kitchen and ask for the menu,” Lohez tells Arab News. “I would rush to the kitchen and smell the food. I have all these memories in my head and it stuck in my DNA.”  

The St. Regis Riyadh. (Supplied)

The first dish he tried to make on his own, he recalls, was mayonnaise.  

“My grandmother always made egg noodles for Sunday lunch, and my task was to make the mayonnaise. It’s a great memory. I remember this dish was amazing,” he says. 

Here, he discusses his favorite dish and his top tips for amateur chefs. He also shares an heirloom tomato salad recipe.  

The St. Regis Riyadh. (Supplied)

When you started out, what was the most common mistake you made? 

I faced a lot of challenges, especially when making pastries. For pastries, you always have to follow the recipes and you have to follow the technique. And as a cook, you make the recipes yourself. It was difficult for me to follow a proper recipe. Cooking is more about the sense and the feeling, but for pastries you have to follow the recipe exactly to get the right consistency. It was challenging. I always say I’ll never be a pastry chef because I don’t want to follow all these recipes. That was my challenge. 

What’s your top tip for amateur chefs? 

Let’s take steak for example. When people are cooking at home, they take the steak from the chiller and put it straight in the pan. This is a mistake. You need to keep it at room temperature for at least 20 minutes. When the protein is in the chiller it is very hard, so you need to make it more tender. And you definitely need to add some marination. You add the sauce, the olive oil and some spices in order to overload it and allow the spices to turn into fiber. Only then do you cook your steak. 

Greek Mezze. (Supplied)  

What one ingredient can instantly improve any dish? 

It’s not an actual ingredient. It’s patience. And love. Whoever you’re cooking for — you, your family, your friends or even for customers — without passion you cannot achieve the right dish.  

When you go out to eat, do you find yourself critiquing the food?  

Not really. I always go to the restaurants to enjoy, not to give criticism. It makes me happy to explore different cultures, different food and different ways to cook. And it gives me inspiration.  

What’s the most common mistake you find in other restaurants? 

It’s about how you engage with the guest. Sometimes the waiter is too close or too eager to interrupt. When I’m in a restaurant, I want to be free and enjoy the food and not be disturbed every five minutes.  

When it comes to food, I’m French, so I like my meat to be rare. It’s difficult in this part of the world to get rare meat. It needs to be not cooked on the inside, but hot. Very few restaurants make steak the way I like it. 

Slow braised beef checks orzo ragout. (Supplied)

What’s your favorite cuisine? 

I don’t really have one. I’m very open-minded about food and food culture. I think it’s the best way to get new ideas. I love Indian food. I love Arabic food. I love Asian food. When I go back to France, I love to have traditional slow-cooked meat or something buttery or creamy.  

What’s your go-to dish if you have to cook something quickly at home? 

Omelet. It is very, very fast for me to make. I am very passionate about it also because my father raises chickens and I always get organic eggs. I think it’s the best way to get the right protein as well. An omelet gives you power throughout the day. It really takes five minutes to make. You can make it with anything, whatever you have at home. 

Wild ceps Aquerello risotto aged parmesan. (Supplied)

What request by customers most annoys you? 

Sometimes the guests do not respect the team. Mistakes can happen. We take the opportunities to learn from our mistakes, but there is no point in showing a lack of respect to anyone. 

As a head chef, what are you like? 

To answer this, I’ll tell you a bit about my background. As I told you, my mother was a chef, but my father was a military policeman. So I learned that discipline is very important to get things done right. However, with this new generation, it’s very important to be fair and to be close to them. You need to lead by example. That is what is most important. I’ve had chefs who shout a lot, but this mindset doesn’t work anymore. I don’t shout in the kitchen. I’m strict, but I want to be close with my team. That’s the secret of success.  

Chef Yann’s heirloom tomato salad recipe 

Chef Yann’s heirloom tomato salad recipe. (Supplied)

 

INGREDIENTS: 

160g goat cheese; 10g honey; 2g Espelette chili  

For the Bloody Mary jelly: 0.5L tomato juice; 5 drops Worcestershire Sauce; 2 drops tabasco; 10g vegetal gelatin; 2g celery salt  

For the heirloom tomatoes: 1 beef heart tomato; 2 Black Krim tomatoes; 1 green zebra tomato; 2 yellow pineapple tomatoes; 8 cherry tomatoes; 1/2 bunch chervil; 1/2 bunch dill; 4g oregano salt; 2g three pepper mix  

For the basil oil: 200ml extra virgin olive; 1/2 bunch basil leaves  

For the Kalamata soil: 50g kalamata olive; 50ml balsamic cream sauce   

INSTRUCTIONS: 

1. In a small bowl, mix goat cheese, honey and chili with a fork. 

2. Roll four balls of 80 grams each. Wrap each of them in a 15cm x 15cm square of cling film. Close it by bringing the four corners together and turning to get the shape of a tomato.  

3. Put the four balls in the freezer for three hours, until they turn hard, then remove the plastic and insert a skewer into each. Keep in the freezer until your Bloody Mary jelly is ready. 

For the Bloody Mary jelly 

1. Heat all the ingredients for the Bloody Mary jelly in a pan and whisk until the jelly becomes smooth.  

2. Soak the goat cheese balls in the jelly on their skewers until you get a red, shiny color. 

For the heirloom tomatoes 

1. Cut all the tomatoes into different shapes. 

2. Keep four green tomatoes for decoration. Fry them for 30 seconds. 

3. Seasoning is important. Add salt and pepper five minutes before plating. 

4. Use the chervil and dill leaves for decoration. Dry them, along with the tomatoes, for five hours at 60 degrees.  

For the basil oil 

1. Put the basil leaves and the olive oil in a mixer and blend. Strain the oil through a coffee filter to get clear green oil. 

For the Kalamata soil 

Dry the olives for five hours at 60 degrees (same as the tomatoes). When they harden, allow to cool, then mix until you get a powder. 

PLATING: 

The plating is always a chance to bring your creativity to the stage. My only advice is to reflect nature on the plate. Start with the beef heart tomato slice in the middle as a base for your goat cheese balls. Don’t forget to add a tomato stalk to them to create ‘realistic’ tomatoes. Create a garden around this with the rest of the tomatoes. Add olive dust and a dot of balsamic cream sauce for the acidity. The dish should be served at room temperature. 


Four of 2024’s top video games so far 

Four of 2024’s top video games so far 
Updated 20 June 2024
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Four of 2024’s top video games so far 

Four of 2024’s top video games so far 

‘Crow Country’ 

SFB Games’ survival horror is a throwback to the glory days of the PlayStation 1, reminiscent of the eerie “Silent Hill” and the classic “Resident Evil.” It’s even set in the Nineties. You play as special agent Mara Forest, investigating the titular abandoned amusement park, which was shut down when its owner mysteriously disappeared and is now populated by mutated former customers. 

‘Senua’s Saga: Hellblade 2’ 

Developers Ninja Theory took a big swing with this sequel to its 2017 award-winning action-adventure game, and it paid off handsomely. The titular Pict warrior, who experiences psychosis, is once again brilliantly voiced by Melina Jürgens and the bigger budget has been used wisely, immersing you in the action as Senua hacks her way through the horrors of 10th-century Iceland. 

‘Animal Well’ 

Playing as a blob might not sound like the most enthralling experience, but Shared Memory’s nonlinear platformer in which you (the blob) must navigate a labyrinth filled with animals, solving puzzles along the way will have most players hooked within minutes. Simple to grasp, but increasingly tough to crack, “Animal Well” can quickly become an obsession. 

‘Prince of Persia: The Lost Crown’ 

Thirteen years on from the last major installment in Ubisoft’s action-adventure platformer, a new hero — Sargon — picks up the mantle. Sargon must leave his clan and embark on a sprawling journey to the cursed Mount Qaf in order to rescue his people’s kidnapped prince. It’s a fantastic-looking game with a well-balanced mix of puzzle solving and combat-based button bashing.