19 Saudi universities among top 100 in the Arab world

Students attend a lecture at King Fahd University. (SPA)
Updated 06 September 2016

19 Saudi universities among top 100 in the Arab world

JEDDAH: Nineteen Saudi universities have been ranked among the top 100 educational institutions in the Arab region, according to the 13th edition of the QS World University Rankings released Monday.
Three universities – who also achieved 5-star rating – made it to the top five rankings in the region, led by King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, King Saud University and King Abdulaziz University (KAU) were rated 1st, 3rd and 4th, respectively.
Others top 50 institutions ranked by QS World are Umm Al-Qura University (18), King Khalid University (21), King Faisal University (22), Al-Imam Muhammad ibn Saudi Islamic University (35), Alfaisal University (37), Prince Sultan University (40) and Qassim University (46).
While universities rated from 50 to 100 are Najran University, Islamic University in Madinah, University of Dammam, Dar Al-Hekmah College for Women, Talibah University, Taif University, Majmaah University, Princes Nora bint Abdulrahman University and Prince Mohammad bin Fahd University.

Global rankings
The rankings include 916 universities from 81 countries. Thirty-three countries feature in the Top 200. The US dominates, with 48 institutions, ahead of the UK (30), Netherlands (12), Germany (11), Canada, Australia (9), Japan (8), China (7), France, Sweden and Hong Kong (5).
US institutions hold all top-three places for the first time since 2004-5, with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is the world's top university for the fifth consecutive year, followed by Stanford and Harvard.
Western European institutions consistently suffered drops in their 2016 rankings, particularly the UK and Germany. The University of Cambridge dropped to fourth.
Russia and South Korea rise significantly, 16 among top-500 universities compared to 13 last year.
Ben Sowter, Head of Research at QS, said: "Institutions in countries providing high levels of targeted funding, whether from endowments or the public purse, rise. Conversely, Western European nations making or proposing cuts to public research spending lose ground to their US and Asian counterparts."
74,651 academics and 37,781 employers contributed to the rankings through the QS global surveys. QS analyzed 10.3 million research papers and 66.3 million citations, indexed by Elsevier's Scopus database.

2016 2015 TOP 20 UNIVERSITIES

1 1 MIT US

2 3= STANFORD US

3 2 HARVARD US

4 3= CAMBRIDGE UK

5 5 CALTECH US

6 6 OXFORD UK

7 7 UCL UK

8 9 ETH ZURICH SWITZERLAND

9 8 IMPERIAL COLLEGE UK

10 10 CHICAGO US

11 11 PRINCETON US

12 12 NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE SINGAPORE

13 13 NANYANG TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY SINGAPORE

14 14 EPFL SWITZERLAND

15 15 YALE US

16 17 CORNELL US

17 16 JOHNS HOPKINS US

18 18 UPENN US

19 21 EDINBURGH UK

20 22 COLUMBIA US


EU countries right to blame Iran for Saudi Aramco attacks: Al-Jubeir

Updated 15 min 33 sec ago

EU countries right to blame Iran for Saudi Aramco attacks: Al-Jubeir

  • The Kingdom is convinced Iran was behind the Sept. 14 attack from evidence collected
  • Al-Jubeir says attack on Aramco facilities reflect Tehran’s hostile intentions in the region

LONDON: Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Affairs State Minister Adel Al-Jubier said the European Union is right in blaming Iran for attacking Aramco’s facilities, stressing that Tehran does not respect the sovereignty of states nor international law.
In remarks made on Monday at a London-based think tank, Al-Jubeir stressed that Saudi Arabia is “convinced through evidence it has (collected) that Iran is involved in the Aramco attacks.”
The Arab coalition fighting to restore the internationally-recognized government in Yemen said an attack on Saudi Arabia on Sept. 14, which triggered the biggest jump in oil prices in almost 30 years, was carried out with Iranian weapons. However, Tehran denies responsibility and the Iranian-backed Houthi militia claimed it was behind the attack.
Following the attack, Britain, Germany and France backed the United States and blamed Iran for the attack on the Kingdom’s oil facilities, urging Tehran to agree to new talks with world powers on its nuclear and missile programs and regional security issues.
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also thanked the European nations for their statement blaming Iran, saying, “This will strengthen diplomacy and the cause of peace.”
Al-Jubeir said Iranian arms are being extended to a number of Arab states.
He said the attack on Aramco facilities reflect Tehran’s hostile intentions in the region, adding: “we are convinced that the missiles that had hit the Saudi oil facilities were Iranian.”
Regarding the Iranian nuclear deal, the Saudi minister said that it has “flaws” as it “does not include Iran’s ballistic missile activity and its hostile interventions in regional affairs.”
“We frequently said we do not want a war, but we remain arms folded in the face of such attacks,” Al-Jubeir said.