Unpaid Alkhobar hospital staff strike

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This combination of still shots from a video shared on social media shows employees of Saad Specialist Hospital in Alkhobar in a heated verbal exchange with guards as they seek an audience with management.
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Updated 21 September 2016

Unpaid Alkhobar hospital staff strike

RIYADH: A large number of employees at Saad Specialist Hospital in Alkhobar has gone on strike because of non-payment of salaries for the past three months. Jamil, an employee, said the hospital administration has not paid their salaries for three months now, after stopping transportation and housing allowance since July 2015.
A nurse said all staff members, including administrators, went on strike. She pointed out that cleaning and security employees, who have low salaries, did not join the strikers because they were properly paid.
She said the hospital’s management has not given any indication as to when they can expect payment or why salaries have not yet been paid. She said the Labor and Social Development Ministry has so far been unable to resolve the issue, despite meeting with staff members several times.
The strike began around three weeks ago, but gathered steam following the Eid holidays.
The hospital employs more than 4,000 people, 19 percent Saudis. The 15-year-old medical facility was considered one of the top hospitals in the region, attracting doctors from all over the world.
The hospital is a part of a conglomerate, which includes civil engineering, construction and real estate investment companies.


All-female Saudi tourist group explores wonders of Tabuk

Updated 21 October 2019

All-female Saudi tourist group explores wonders of Tabuk

  • About 20 women from different parts of the Kingdom took part in the sightseeing trip to the province bordering the Red Sea

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s first all-female tourist group has explored the environmental and archaeological wonders of Tabuk in the northwest of the Kingdom.

About 20 women from different parts of the Kingdom took part in the sightseeing trip to the province bordering the Red Sea.

“They were astonished to see such sights in their country, especially the area of Ras Al-Sheikh Humaid,” said Heba Al-Aidai, a tour guide in Tabuk who organized the trip.

“They did not expect to see such a place in Saudi Arabia. They looked speechless while standing close to the turquoise water of the sea. It is a truly breathtaking view.”

Al-Aidai and her colleague Nafla Al-Anazi promoted the trip on social media and attracted a group of homemakers, teachers and staff workers from all over the Kingdom, aged from 22 to over 50.

The tour was educational, too, and the women were told about the history of the places they visited. “They were taken to the Caves of Shuaib (Magha’er Shuaib), the place where Prophet Moses fled after leaving Egypt, and where he got married to one of the daughters of Prophet Shuaib, according to some historians. It was really a positive experience,” Al-Aidai said.

The visitors also explored Tayeb Ism, a small town in northwestern Tabuk, where there is a well-known gap in the towering mountains through which water runs throughout the year.

Al-Aidai said such trips aim to encourage tourism in Tabuk, and introduce Saudi tourists and other visitors to the landmarks of the region.