Hayat Sindi to women: Opt for a career in science

Updated 18 January 2013
0

Hayat Sindi to women: Opt for a career in science

Hayat Sindi is one of the newly appointed Shoura members. She recently figured in Newsweek’s list of 150 women who shook the world in 2012. She is founder and CEO of the i2 institute of Imagination and Ingenuity, a leading nongovernmental organization in the field of scientific innovations in the Arab world. She is also the first Saudi woman to obtain a doctorate from Cambridge University in the field of Biotechnology. Sindi is science ambassador for UNESCO.
“The introduction of women into the Shoura Council is a fantastic move and a historical change to give women a decision-making role. Women are part of change in all the different sectors of society,” said Sindi.
What the rest of the world is thinking of women of Saudi Arabia is not her concern, said Sindi, and she is not interested in answering those queries. “In the Kingdom, women have an equal share and honor. Now with the appointment of women to the Shoura, King Abdullah has displayed gender justice again.”
She feels honored and proud that the king has trusted and selected her for the Shoura Council and she feels it is her duty now to take on this new role. She said that she is proud to be entrusted with this responsibility.
Sindi said that she could contribute to having Saudi society achieve progress in every field.
“I have always been interested in advancing women's issues. The participation of women in the council will facilitate discussion on women's and children's rights. For the country, I want to concentrate on innovating education and scientific research, and inspire the youth to take an interest in science. The idea is to make them motivated, creative and most importantly to unlock their own potential and move ahead using their talent for the benefit of our country. I am excited to collaborate with this group of women, who have the highest level of experience and their own professional expertise. Together, I hope we will be able to put forward programs and proposals that the executive institutions can take.”
Encouraging innovation and science and coaxing young women to build their own enterprises will lead to job diversity and job creation, said Sindi. “Through science and innovation, we can solve problems of water, energy, environment and health sectors.”
Saudi citizens can realize their dream to become innovative scientist through conducting scientific and technological studies in Saudi universities, said Sindi. She would like Saudi scientists to believe in themselves.
The main obstacle Sindi faced before achieving her current position in the Shoura Council was to make people give her a chance and trust her. “I have made a long journey to achieve this position and there is still more to do. I just know that the interests and passion of Saudi men and women will be of great help.”
Sindi wishes both men and women would opt for careers in the field of science. “It is crucial for them to have a passion and set a goal in this field. A target helps us when we aren’t sure how to tackle hardships. I would suggest to all, especially women, not to restrict themselves but remain open to different ideas and solutions. I want to see meaningful scientific technology become a part of the curriculum of our universities so our people can make this world a better place.”


Clean sweep: Marine waste targeted in Red Sea tourism program

The program for eliminating marine debris will play an important material and moral role with the support of the residents of areas surrounding the seafront. (SPA)
Updated 22 September 2019

Clean sweep: Marine waste targeted in Red Sea tourism program

  • Debris major cause of death for marine life
  • Disintegration of plastic waste threaten human food resources

JEDDAH: A beach cleanup program targeting marine waste has been launched by the Red Sea Development Co. (TRSDC), the Saudi Press Agency reported.
The firm, which is behind the development of a luxury seafront tourism destination in Saudi Arabia, is already developing a range of environment-friendly policies such as zero-waste-to-landfill, zero-discharge-to-the-sea, zero-single-use plastics, and achieving 100 percent carbon neutrality. On Saturday it launched the Marine Debris Beach Clean Up Program as part of the Red Sea Project. “Eliminating marine debris is receiving increasing attention from the media that it has become a global cause, urging us to participate in protecting our virgin environment for which our seafront is known,” said TRSDC CEO John Pagano.
“The program for eliminating marine debris will play an important material and moral role with the support of the residents of areas surrounding the seafront. It will also shed light on the importance of reducing the use of nonrecyclable plastics, in addition to encouraging the disposing of these substances in a safe and sustainable manner.”
The TRSDC will continue to explore ways for recycled materials to be a source of employment opportunities for the area’s residents, he added. 
TRSDC is an official partner of the United Nations’ initiative to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the cleanup program will initially support two SDGs: Life Below Water and Life on Land. It will expand to support other SDGs, including Responsible Consumption and Production, Sustainable Cities and Communities, Decent Work and the Growth of the Economy, Ending Poverty, and Quality Education.

HIGHLIGHTS

• TRSDC is an official partner of the United Nations’ initiative to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the cleanup program will initially support two SDGs: Life Below Water and Life on Land.

• It will expand to support other SDGs, including Responsible Consumption and Production, Sustainable Cities and Communities, Decent Work and the Growth of the Economy, Ending Poverty, and Quality Education.

• Institutions or individuals wishing to take part in the beach cleanup program can find more details here: www.act4sdgs.org/partner/TheRedSeaProject

Dr. Rusty Brainard, chief environment officer at TRSDC, said: “Marine debris causes significant damage to the environment and is a major cause of death for many marine organism species, which may ingest these substances. Moreover, the disintegration of plastic waste into small pieces that penetrate into the food web base may also threaten human food resources. Our program for eliminating marine litter is a long-term project that includes ongoing monitoring of environmental health, as well as periodic intervention to clean up any waste in the Red Sea Project.”
TRSDC has teamed up with leading academic institutions in the Kingdom, such as King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and the University of Tabuk, on a number of educational initiatives, added Brainard.
The partnership between TRSDC and KAUST has led to an international competition — “Brains for Brine” — that encourages academics, scientists, engineers and the water industry to find solutions for managing the disposal of brine, which is a waste product of water desalination, in a sustainable and commercially viable way.
KAUST has also helped TRSDC with marine spatial planning for the Red Sea Project.
As part of the planning process, major environmental studies were carried out to ensure that the area’s sensitive ecology was protected both during and after completion of the development.
The final master plan, which preserves around 75 percent of the destination’s islands for conservation and designates nine islands as sites of significant ecological value, required several redesigns to avoid potential disruption to endangered species native to the area.
Institutions or individuals wishing to take part in the beach clean-up program can find more details here: www.act4sdgs.org/partner/TheRedSeaProject