Muslim world questions logic behind Charlie antics

Updated 15 January 2015

Muslim world questions logic behind Charlie antics

RIYADH/CAIRO: Iyad Madani, secretary-general of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, has denounced the publication of sacrilegious cartoons by French magazine Charlie Hebdo Wednesday, calling the move “insolence, ignorance and foolishness.”
He said: “Freedom of speech must not become a hate-speech and it must not offend others. No sane person, regardless of doctrine, religion or faith, accepts his beliefs being ridiculed.”
Prominent Saudi scholar Sheikh Ahmed Al-Ghamdi said that publication of the latest image was a mistake. “It’s not a good way to make the people understand us. Jesus or Moses, all messengers (of God) we should respect,” and should not be made fun of in pictures or words, Ghamdi said. “I believe it will make more problems.”
The Grand Mufti of Jerusalem and Palestinian lands, Mohammed Hussein, said such cartoons “fuel feelings of hatred and resentment among people” and publishing them “shows contempt” for Muslim feelings.
Leading Islamic authority Al-Azhar denounced the new edition and said: “The stature of the Prophet of Mercy is greater and more lofty than to be harmed by cartoons that are unrestrained by decency and civilized standards.” It said: “Al-Azhar calls on all Muslims to ignore this hateful frivolity.”
The International Union of Muslim Scholars also criticized the antics of Charlie Hebdo, claiming they would further stir up hatred, extremism and tension. “It is neither reasonable, nor logical, nor wise to publish drawings and films offensive or attacking the Prophet of Islam,” said the Qatar-based union, headed by Yusuf Al-Qardawi.
According to the union, publication of the drawing would give further “credibility” to the idea that “the West is against Islam.” It said: “If we agree that (those who committed the attacks) are a minority that do not represent Islam or Muslims, then how can we respond with actions that are not directed against them, but against the Prophet revered by a billion-and-a-half Muslims?”
Meanwhile, Yemen’s Al-Qaeda branch on Wednesday confirmed it carried out last week’s deadly assault in Paris and vowed more attacks on the West.
In a video posted on Twitter, a commander said: “You will look for peace and stability but you will not find it because of the deeds of those carrying out martyrdom operations and heroes of lone jihad.”
He said the Yemeni-American cleric Anwar Al-Awlaki, who was killed in a US drone strike in Yemen in September 2011, had arranged the attack.


Saudi Arabia participates in GCC archaeology exhibition

The pavilion features a series of documentaries on Saudi Arabia’s cultural heritage. (SPA)
Updated 21 January 2020

Saudi Arabia participates in GCC archaeology exhibition

  • Saudi Arabia’s pavilion hosts, 55 artifacts and relics covering different eras, including from the Stone Age, Bronze Age, and the pre-Islamic and Islamic periods

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia, represented by the national heritage sector at the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), is taking part in the 6th Joint Periodic Exhibition on the Archaeology of the Gulf Cooperation Council’s (GCC) Arab States in Kuwait.
The exhibition, held under the supervision of the secretary-general of the GCC, in partnership with the Kuwaiti National Council for Culture, Arts and Literature, opened last Wednesday at the National Museum of Kuwait and will run until Feb. 15.
The Kingdom’s pavilion hosts, 55 artifacts and relics covering different eras, including from the Stone Age, Bronze Age, and the pre-Islamic and Islamic periods.
The pavilion also features a series of documentaries on the Kingdom’s cultural heritage, a number of publications by the antiquities and museums sector on different areas of cultural heritage, as well as a collection of photographs and historical information on Saudi Arabia’s cultural depth.