Indian student gang-raped, thrown off bus in New Delhi

Indian student gang-raped, thrown off bus in New Delhi
Updated 17 December 2012

Indian student gang-raped, thrown off bus in New Delhi

Indian student gang-raped, thrown off bus in New Delhi

NEW DELHI: Indian police were searching New Delhi Monday for the men who gang-raped a 23-old-student and threw her off a bus in an attack that has sparked fresh concern for the safety of women in the city.
The woman accompanied by a male friend boarded a bus on Sunday night and was attacked by at least four men and gang-raped, police said.
Some media reports said the attackers also included staff of the bus.
The victim’s companion was battered with iron rods before the men took turns and raped her, police officials said.
The couple were then thrown off the moving bus, seriously injuring the woman, they said.
“When they boarded the bus, there were a few other men as well in the vehicle,” area police chief Chhaya Sharma told reporters.
“As of now, we can confirm the involvement of four men,” she said, adding police artists have drawn sketches of the attackers from descriptions given by the victims.
Sharma said the female victim was in intensive care in a city hospital where her companion is also being treated.
The attack sparked new calls for greater security for women in New Delhi, which registered 568 rapes in 2011 compared to 218 in India’s financial capital Mumbai the same year.
“This is a shocking incident. I hope that the guilty are punished for the heinous crime,” said Kiran Walia, women and child development minister in the Delhi state government.
Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit promised “precautions” to prevent such attacks in the future but did not elaborate.
New Delhi’s shiny new metro has reserved a carriage in every train for woman while several police stations in university and other areas have all-female staff to try and stem rising crime against women.
Rape cases in India more than doubled between 1990 and 2008, according to official data.


France targets mosques in extremism crackdown

Updated 03 December 2020

France targets mosques in extremism crackdown

France targets mosques in extremism crackdown
  • Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin said that if any of the 76 prayer halls inspected were found to promote extremism they would be closed down
  • Inspections are part of France’s response to two attacks — the beheading of teacher Samuel Paty and the killing of three people in a Nice church

PARIS: French authorities will inspect dozens of mosques and prayer halls suspected of radical teachings starting Thursday as part of a crackdown on extremists following a spate of attacks, Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin said.

Darmanin told RTL radio that if any of the 76 prayer halls inspected was found to promote extremism they would be closed down.

The inspections are part of the government’s response to two brutal recent attacks that shocked France — the October 16 beheading of a teacher who showed his pupils cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad and the stabbing to death of three people in a church in Nice on October 29.

Darmanin did not reveal which places of worship would be inspected. In a note he sent to regional security chiefs, seen by AFP, he cites 16 addresses in the Paris region and 60 others around the country.

On Twitter Wednesday he said the mosques were suspected of “separatism” — a term President Emmanuel Macron has used to describe ultraconservative Muslims closing themselves off from French society by, for example, enrolling their children in underground schools or forcing young girls to wear the Muslim headscarf.

The rightwing minister told RTL the fact that only a fraction of the around 2,600 Muslim places of worship in France were suspected of peddling radical theories showed “we are far from a situation of widespread radicalization.”

“Nearly all Muslims in France respect the laws of the Republic and are hurt by that (radicalization),” he said.
The killing of teacher Samuel Paty, who had shown his pupils cartoons of Mohammad in a class on free speech, at a school outside Paris sent shockwaves through France, where it was seen as an attack on the republic itself.

In the aftermath of his murder the authorities raided dozens of associations, sports groups and charities suspected of promoting extremism.
They also ordered the temporary closure of a large mosque in the Paris suburb of Pantin that had shared a vitriolic video lambasting Paty.

The government has also announced plans to step up the deportations of illegal migrants on radicalization watchlists.
Darmanin said that 66 of 231 foreigners on a watchlist had been expelled, around 50 others had been put in migrant detention centers and a further 30 had been placed under house arrest.

The minister announced the latest clampdown after receiving fierce criticism for pushing a bill that would make it harder to document police brutality.

Images of officers beating up black music producer Michel Zecler in his studio brought tens of thousands of people onto the streets last weekend against Darmanin’s push to restrict the filming of the police in the new bill.
MPs from Macron’s ruling Republic on the Move party have since announced plans to rewrite the legislation.