Rights groups reject CITC monitoring

Updated 29 March 2013

Rights groups reject CITC monitoring

Saudi human rights groups have rejected a plan by the country's telecommunications authority to monitor the popular Internet communications applications Skype, Viber and WhatsApp. They say the proposed measure contravenes an Arab human rights convention signed by the Saudi government.
The reaction from the National Society for Human Rights (NSHR) and the Saudi Human Rights Association (SHRA) comes after the Communications and Information Technology Commission (CITC) earlier this week ordered local operators to install monitoring servers. If monitoring servers are not installed, the free services may be blocked, the CITC had warned.
"This is a breach of the ninth article of the Saudi communication system which stipulates the secrecy of data and information of any phone calls that a person makes," Saleh Al-Khathlan, spokesman of the NSHR, was quoted as saying in a local newspaper.
Media officer at the SHRA, Muhammad Al-Muadi, said the association is taking the side of citizens. "(The SHRA) is in the process of discussing the issues with the CITC concerning the motives for such a measure."
"The CITC does not have the power to deal with this matter. It does not have jurisdiction over the control of communication and information," said Al-Khathlan.
He said the measure contravenes the Arab Charter on Human Rights that the Kingdom has signed. "If there is any threat (posed by) these applications, the CITC should cooperate with the service providers to find solutions for users, voluntary ones, not obligatory ones, such as firewalls," he said.
Al-Muadi said that the issue would be discussed further with the CITC. "These means of communication is for the benefit of each household, linking family members inside and outside the Kingdom. They are international means of communication."
Arab News reported earlier this week that expatriates and citizens were concerned about the implications of the monitoring and possible blocking of the services.
Expatriates polled said these applications were cheap and essential tools to keep in contact with loved ones back home.
A Saudi citizen raised privacy issues by asking whether the female members of his family have to remain veiled once Skype is monitored.


Snap happy: Every face tells a story for Saudi photographer

Updated 16 min 25 sec ago

Snap happy: Every face tells a story for Saudi photographer

  • “There is something majestic about people’s faces, their expressions,” says Abdullah Al-Joghiman

DHAHRAN: Saudi portrait photographer Abdullah Al-Joghiman has a message for everybody: You are beautiful just the way you are.

If you don’t believe him, let him take your picture.

“Even if you’re not photogenic, or think you look bad in pictures, I can always turn your frown upside down,” he said.

Al-Joghiman is a full-time financial analyst for the Saudi Electricity Co., but allows plenty of time for his work as a freelance portrait and event photographer on the side.

“I started off doing landscape photography, but I love portrait photography more. Landscape photographers have to travel a lot, and I wasn’t able to commit to that lifestyle for many reasons. But since I was a child I’ve always loved taking pictures of people. There is something majestic about people’s faces, their expressions,” he told Arab News.

The 34-year-old was born in Al-Hofuf and now lives in Dammam, but his passion for photography has taken him all over the Kingdom and to other areas of the world.

Al-Joghiman at the 2018 Middle East Film and Comic Con in Dubai. (Supplied)

Al-Joghiman has been asked to shoot for local events such as Gamers’ Con and internationally at conventions in Kuwait, Singapore and the UAE. In 2019, he was commissioned to photograph the World Cosplay Summit in Japan, traveling with a Saudi team competing at the event for the first time.

“It was amazing, I met people from around 20 countries who came to take part,” he said. “It was a great experience.”

Completely self-taught, Al-Joghiman caught the photography bug at college and has been training himself ever since. “I’ve been dabbling in photography since high school, but I started taking it more seriously in college. I’ve been shooting professionally since 2012 or 2013,” he said.

Al-Joghiman started off humbly, with a camera-centric smartphone, but has since expanded his collection significantly, and now shoots with a variety of high-tech cameras from Sony. Now he is attracting interest from both local and international sponsors, especially in the gaming and cosplay areas.

“Cosplayers are kind of difficult to shoot because they can be perfectionists, but I love seeing the joy on their faces when they see the final pictures. That makes it worthwhile,” he said.

Al-Joghiman is happy that social restrictions on photography in Saudi Arabia are easing, allowing him to find more opportunities to do the work he loves.

“It’s difficult to take pictures of people here, especially strangers, but I can’t really blame them, considering that they are not really used to that in our culture. But things are changing and it’s much easier to be a photographer in Saudi Arabia now,” he said.

HIGHLIGHT

Abdullah Al-Joghiman has been asked to shoot for local events such as Gamers’ Con and internationally at conventions in Kuwait, Singapore and the UAE. In 2019, he was commissioned to photograph the World Cosplay Summit in Japan, traveling with a Saudi team competing at the event for the first time.

He is grateful for the Ministry of Culture’s efforts to revive the Kingdom’s art scene, and has long hoped that photography will become more regulated in the country.

“The market for photography and videography really needs to be regulated. It’s hard enough putting a price on one’s work without scoping out the competition and finding that someone else is charging thousands for just a headshot when I’m doing shoots for two or three hundred,” he said.

“I love my work, and I’d love to be able to do it for free, but at the end of the day I still need to eat,” he said.

Al-Joghiman doesn’t want to limit anyone else’s opportunities but simply wants the playing field evened out a little.

“As a photographer, I just want a fair chance for everyone. More importantly, a client should know exactly what they are paying for,” he said.

His advice to young Saudis looking to become photographers is this: “If you pursue photography, don’t worry. Just do what you love, and if people tell you that they don’t look good in pictures, convince them by taking a picture of them.”

AlJoghiman’s work can be found on Instagram and Twitter (@finalecco), and on his website, https://www.eccofantasyph.com