King Abdullah translation prize winners named

Updated 14 April 2013

King Abdullah translation prize winners named

 

The winners of the King Abdullah International Prize for Translation 2013 were announced by the Board of Trustees at a function here yesterday. 
The five winners in the category for institutions will receive a cash prize of SR 750,000 each, while individual winners will get SR 500,000 each.
Deputy Foreign Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Abdullah, who is also chairman of the Board of Trustees of the International Prize and member of the Board of Directors of the King Abdul Aziz Public Library, chaired the function.
Prince Abdulaziz said translations help bring people together. “Translated works allow people and nations see what others have achieved in the fields of science, literature and arts,” he said. Translations also enrich various cultures, he added.
Prince Abdulaziz said the prize for translation in natural sciences was shared by Reem Mohammad Al-Towairqi for her translation from English into Arabic of the book “How Things Work: The Physics of Everyday Life”. The book discusses several physics topics in a new and creative way.
The co-winners were Abdulnaser Salah Ibrahim and Ali Abdullah Al-Salama for their translation from English into Arabic of the book by Michael Wilson “Bacteriology of Humans: An Ecological Perspective.”
The Translation Award for Institutions was given to the Arab Center for Arabization, Translation, Authorship and Publication (ACATAP), an organization of the Arab League's Arab Center for Arabization and Translation, which was founded in 1990 in Damascus.
According to the committee, ACATAP is known for its prolific output in translation and Arabization of higher education and tertiary education publications. Its efforts have enriched Arabic libraries with more than 130 books in 14 scientific fields.
The Award in Humanities from other languages into Arabic was jointly awarded to Salwa Saliman Naqli for her translation of Peter Stockwell’s book “Cognitive Poetics: An Introduction” from English into Arabic, and Rasha Saad Zaki for her translation of Thomas Sowell’s book “Applied Economics” from English into Arabic.
The Award in Humanities from Arabic into other languages was given to Cecilia Martini for her translation of the book “Al-Farabi: Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle” from Arabic into Italian.
The Award for Efforts in Translation for Individuals went to Joao Baptista de Medeiros Vargens, author and Brazilian university professor, and Luis Miguel Peres Canada, a Spanish university professor and author.
The Board of Trustees decided to withhold the Translation Award in Natural Sciences from Arabic into other languages because the submitted works did not meet set scientific standards.
There were six categories for the awards this year, namely, the Translation Award for Institutions; Efforts in Translation for Individuals; Humanities Translation from Other Languages into Arabic; Humanities from Arabic into Other Languages; Natural Sciences Translation from Other Languages into Arabic; and Natural Sciences from Arabic into Other Languages.


Snap happy: Every face tells a story for Saudi photographer

Updated 46 min 1 sec ago

Snap happy: Every face tells a story for Saudi photographer

  • “There is something majestic about people’s faces, their expressions,” says Abdullah Al-Joghiman

DHAHRAN: Saudi portrait photographer Abdullah Al-Joghiman has a message for everybody: You are beautiful just the way you are.

If you don’t believe him, let him take your picture.

“Even if you’re not photogenic, or think you look bad in pictures, I can always turn your frown upside down,” he said.

Al-Joghiman is a full-time financial analyst for the Saudi Electricity Co., but allows plenty of time for his work as a freelance portrait and event photographer on the side.

“I started off doing landscape photography, but I love portrait photography more. Landscape photographers have to travel a lot, and I wasn’t able to commit to that lifestyle for many reasons. But since I was a child I’ve always loved taking pictures of people. There is something majestic about people’s faces, their expressions,” he told Arab News.

The 34-year-old was born in Al-Hofuf and now lives in Dammam, but his passion for photography has taken him all over the Kingdom and to other areas of the world.

Al-Joghiman at the 2018 Middle East Film and Comic Con in Dubai. (Supplied)

Al-Joghiman has been asked to shoot for local events such as Gamers’ Con and internationally at conventions in Kuwait, Singapore and the UAE. In 2019, he was commissioned to photograph the World Cosplay Summit in Japan, traveling with a Saudi team competing at the event for the first time.

“It was amazing, I met people from around 20 countries who came to take part,” he said. “It was a great experience.”

Completely self-taught, Al-Joghiman caught the photography bug at college and has been training himself ever since. “I’ve been dabbling in photography since high school, but I started taking it more seriously in college. I’ve been shooting professionally since 2012 or 2013,” he said.

Al-Joghiman started off humbly, with a camera-centric smartphone, but has since expanded his collection significantly, and now shoots with a variety of high-tech cameras from Sony. Now he is attracting interest from both local and international sponsors, especially in the gaming and cosplay areas.

“Cosplayers are kind of difficult to shoot because they can be perfectionists, but I love seeing the joy on their faces when they see the final pictures. That makes it worthwhile,” he said.

Al-Joghiman is happy that social restrictions on photography in Saudi Arabia are easing, allowing him to find more opportunities to do the work he loves.

“It’s difficult to take pictures of people here, especially strangers, but I can’t really blame them, considering that they are not really used to that in our culture. But things are changing and it’s much easier to be a photographer in Saudi Arabia now,” he said.

HIGHLIGHT

Abdullah Al-Joghiman has been asked to shoot for local events such as Gamers’ Con and internationally at conventions in Kuwait, Singapore and the UAE. In 2019, he was commissioned to photograph the World Cosplay Summit in Japan, traveling with a Saudi team competing at the event for the first time.

He is grateful for the Ministry of Culture’s efforts to revive the Kingdom’s art scene, and has long hoped that photography will become more regulated in the country.

“The market for photography and videography really needs to be regulated. It’s hard enough putting a price on one’s work without scoping out the competition and finding that someone else is charging thousands for just a headshot when I’m doing shoots for two or three hundred,” he said.

“I love my work, and I’d love to be able to do it for free, but at the end of the day I still need to eat,” he said.

Al-Joghiman doesn’t want to limit anyone else’s opportunities but simply wants the playing field evened out a little.

“As a photographer, I just want a fair chance for everyone. More importantly, a client should know exactly what they are paying for,” he said.

His advice to young Saudis looking to become photographers is this: “If you pursue photography, don’t worry. Just do what you love, and if people tell you that they don’t look good in pictures, convince them by taking a picture of them.”

AlJoghiman’s work can be found on Instagram and Twitter (@finalecco), and on his website, https://www.eccofantasyph.com