Dozens of mummies found in pre-Inca royal tomb in Peru

Updated 02 July 2013
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Dozens of mummies found in pre-Inca royal tomb in Peru

LIMA: Polish and Peruvian archaeologists have discovered a royal burial chamber with 60 mummies and some 1,200 gold, silver and ceramic objects from over 1,000 years ago in Peru.
The mummies — including three princesses — and other items date back to a pre-Inca culture called the Wari, who peaked between the seventh and 11th centuries, researchers said.
“This is a unique find,” said archaeologist Giersz Milosz of the University of Warsaw on Friday. “This is the first Peruvian discovery of a royal tomb from the Wari culture,” of which little is known.
The find, in an area known as El Castillo, about 300 kms north of Lima, follows two earlier finds by the Polish and Peruvian team in 2010.
The chamber was discovered two meters underground and covered with 33 tons of gravel. The tombs of the princesses — apparently wives of Wari chiefs — were at one end of the 17 square meter chamber.
Most of the mummies were women, buried in an upright position, a sign of rank, according to the researchers.
They were adorned in silver and gold jewelry, and buried with ceramic vessels and baskets filled with more jewelry.
Archaeologist also found pots, pitchers, carved stone objects, ceremonial knives and other objects in good condition and of great cultural value, said researcher Patrycja Przadka-Giersz, wife of Giersz.


Philippines’ Duterte pestered again as gecko stalls speech

Updated 20 September 2019

Philippines’ Duterte pestered again as gecko stalls speech

  • In a previous speech lambasting the Catholic clergy, a fly kept buzzing around him and landed on his forehead
  • While attacking the political opposiion during an election campaign, a big cockroach crawled up his shoulder and down his shirt

MANILA: Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte just keeps getting bugged during his public speeches.
A noisy gecko was the latest wildlife contributor to an address by Duterte, interrupting the leader on Thursday evening just as he launched another tirade at human rights groups critical of his bloody war on drugs.
The reptile’s persistence caused laugher in the crowd of mostly soldiers, causing Duterte stop mid-sentence, turn to his left and pause for a while to see what the off-camera commotion was.
“You brought a gecko here?” he asked an official sitting behind him, drawing laughs.
Geckos are common across Southeast Asia. The small lizard-like reptiles are known for their ability to produce various loud sounds, from barks to chirps, to communicate or when threatened.
While activists accuse Duterte of cowing his opponents into silence, reptiles and insects have no qualms about pestering him during his often hours-long, televised addresses.
A big cockroach crawled up his shoulder and down his shirt during a speech in May when he was lambasting an opposition party ahead of a national election. He joked the cockroach was its supporter.
Two months later, a fly kept buzzing around him and landing on his forehead, just as he was berating his rivals in the Catholic clergy. He said in jest that the fly was acting on their orders.