Labor crisis hits 36% of construction projects

Updated 23 July 2013

Labor crisis hits 36% of construction projects

The number of registered construction project contracts in the Kingdom was 250,000 before the first grace period to legalize expatriate workers ended. However, 90,000 of these registered contracts belonging to small contracting companies have since been canceled, according to Raed Aqeili, a member of the National Committee in Saudi Chambers.
Most big projects were affected by this decision because they relied on small companies for employment. During the grace period many of the contractors moved their employees to other sectors, while some individual workers returned to practice professions stated in their iqamas, or residency permits, Aqeili added.
Some contracting companies have the professional skills, but they need to exert more effort in executing their businesses. After laborers left these companies, their projects were temporarily affected. Aqeili feared the problem might escalate in the coming months, especially after the end of the grace period.
Aqeili said contracting companies need to hire professional laborers who can carry out contracting work from rental companies.
The cost of the current five-year plan for projects — which started in 2009 and will finish in 2014 — is SR400 billion. But most of the projects have not been completed.
Aqeili hoped labor crisis would be resolved. He said speedy solutions need to be reached to guarantee the existence of sufficient labor in the contracting markets to avoid further crises.


Abdullah bin Mufreh Al-Dhayabi, president of Tabuk University

Updated 11 December 2019

Abdullah bin Mufreh Al-Dhayabi, president of Tabuk University

  • Al-Dhayabi began his academic career as a lecturer at KAU
  • Al-Dhayabi is a member of the higher committees for female colleges in the Kingdom

RIYADH: Dr. Abdullah bin Mufreh Al-Dhayabi has been the president of Tabuk University since October 2017.

Prior to that, he was the deputy head of educational affairs at King Abdul Aziz University (KAU) in Jeddah, where he served in the position for one year. 

He has also been the chairman of the promotion and job competition committee, as well as the safety committee, at Tabuk University since November 2012. 

Al-Dhayabi began his academic career as a lecturer at KAU, where he received his bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the College of Science. 

He later traveled abroad to pursue his higher education, earning his master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Missouri, US. He obtained his doctorate from the University of Birmingham, UK.

After that, he returned to the Kingdom and joined KAU as an assistant professor. He remained in that position from 2005 to 2010, then served as an associate professor between 2010 and 2014.

Al-Dhayabi is a member of the higher committees for female colleges in the Kingdom and the community colleges higher committee at the Ministry of Higher Education.

He congratulated King Salman on the release of the government’s annual budget for 2020.

“Approximately one-fifth of the budget is allocated to education, which reflects the leadership’s keenness to invest in the human element through education and training ... to open new horizons and job opportunities for Saudi youth and encourage them to invest in the diverse resources in the Kingdom,” Al-Dhayabi said.