Administrative jobs in polyclinics to be reserved for Saudis

Administrative jobs in polyclinics to be reserved for Saudis
Updated 10 November 2013

Administrative jobs in polyclinics to be reserved for Saudis

Administrative jobs in polyclinics to be reserved for Saudis

Expatriates holding administrative positions in private hospitals and polyclinics in the Kingdom could lose their jobs with health care bigwigs planning to “Saudize” these positions.
Hani Al-Kholaif, a member of the Council of Saudi Chambers' health committee, admitted that together with the Human Resources Development Fund, it had started looking at administrative jobs in all private hospitals and polyclinics.
He said Saudis would replace expatriates in administrative positions in education, technical and health specialties.
Al-Kholaifi said that the committee was indeed providing training courses and awareness classes for Saudis to prepare them for the jobs. “The training courses helped more than 80 Saudi women find jobs in polyclinics,” Al-Kholaifi said.
The Saudization move, however, has not found solid support from the medical fraternity that believes that it would have an adverse impact on the sector.
The Riyadh Chamber of Commerce and Industry (RCCI), in a study undertaken by it, found that expats accounted for 51 percent of the Kingdom’s health care sector labor force.
Dr. Eyad Mohammed Shafiq Saleh Imam, consultant orthopedic surgeon and member of the Health Service Committee at the Jeddah Chamber of Commerce and Industry (JCCI), said: “There is severe shortage of foreign and local health care specialists right now, even in the Ministry of Health hospitals. And it is because of this that most people prefer to travel to other Gulf countries for treatment.
“I don’t understand the need to ‘Saudize’ the private health care sector,” Saleh Imam said, and pointed out that all countries in the world allow other nationalities to work in their hospitals.
He believed that replacement would take a long time to achieve. “I personally don’t see it happening in the near future. In my opinion, the ministry needs to have a huge makeover before we start talking about these long-term projects."
“What is being done now is a catastrophe,” says Saleh Imam, adding: “Private clinics are being shut down and foreign doctors are being sent away ... We are forgetting that these doctors came when they were needed and now after they spent 20-30 years here in the Kingdom, they are being simply thrown away. This is not fair.”