The lemon detox diet: A quick weight loss plan

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Updated 23 April 2014

The lemon detox diet: A quick weight loss plan

The lemon detox has been around for more than half a century but renewed interest has been generated in the diet program after the internationally celebrated American singer, song writer and actress Beyonce announced her secret of going on a lemon detox diet where she lost 10 kilos for the movie Dreamgirl. This kind of diet is known as the Master cleanser and many say it is very effective in breaking down toxins that have built up in the body.
The Lemon Detox diet first became famous when Stanley Burroughs, the creator of the diet and author of “The Master Cleanse” recommended it for the healing of stomach ulcers.
In his book he talked about how he first came to test this diet on a patient who suffered from stomach sores for three years. Left with no other recourse, the patient approached Stanley who recommended that he undertake the cleanse diet. After eleven days, the patient was totally healed leaving doctors amazed. Many other cases followed and the results were consistent curing the patients within ten days. Of particular note also was that those undergoing the Master Cleanse also experienced a reduction in weight.
The diet plan is very strict and involves drinking a lemon juice mixture and not eating any food for up to two weeks and sometimes more. The person on the lemon detox diet is only allowed to consume the Master Cleanse elixir to keep hydrated; this comprises six or more servings of lemonade everyday.
There is another option added to the lemonade, which is a Salt Water Flush of two teaspoons salt mixed in 200 g of water in the morning and warm herbal tea at night.
The diet offers enough nutrients to keep one energized and to cleanse the body of unwanted toxins. If you are looking to lose anywhere from 12 to 20 pounds in just two short weeks with a Detox that has been around for years and you want to jump start your metabolism, the Lemon Detox Diet will get your body off to a great start.
Dietitian Sara Abduljawad said she tried the diet herself and it worked like a miracle but she suggests that women eat healthy along with the diet. “All you need is to take half a glass of very cold water and squeeze in the juice of half a lemon leaving the pulp and seeds out. You should add two tablespoons of pure Maple Syrup and a pinch of cayenne pepper or ground ginger to that and stir it well,” she said. “Then you should fill up the other half of the glass with cold water, stir and enjoy,” she added.
Abduljawad said there is no scientific evidence that one might need to go on any kind of detox diet and she did it only to test it herself. “If you want to cleanse your body you should eat healthy, quit smoking and trust your liver to do its job,” she said. “This diet is unbalanced and is very dangerous for your body because it can rob your intestines of healthy bacteria that aid digestion and boost immunity,” she added.
The dietitian says this kind of diet can induce rapid weight loss which may result in losing lean muscle. “We sometimes don’t understand why people and especially women cannot follow a healthy meal plan and instead choose to go on an all liquid diet,” said Abduljawad. “The lemon diet lacks essential nutrients such as calories, protein, carbs, fiber, vitamins, minerals and fat. This is why I don’t recommend it because every diet should either contain the essential nutrients or the person should take supplements,” she added.
Fitness expert and personal trainer Salah Mansour said fasting and detoxing is risky. In the long term one should eat fewer carbs, less sugar, fat and hit the gym everyday.
“Lean muscle and fluids and not belly fat are the first to go in starvation diets. Usually when one starves their body they end up bingeing on unhealthy foods high in sugar and fat,” he said. “Any diet should contain protein because your body will have to get protein from other sources which will lead it to burn your own muscle mass leaving your body with high fat and low muscle,” he added.
Manour said if women want to lose weight fast for a special occasion they should exercise more and go on a low-calorie balanced diet because quick weight loss doesn’t last and in many cases the lost weight returns with added kilos.

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When coronavirus robs you of your sense of smell

Updated 06 July 2020

When coronavirus robs you of your sense of smell

  • “Anosmia cuts you off from the smells of life, it’s a torture.” — Jean-Michel Maillard, president of anosmie.org

PARIS: “What I miss most is the smell of my son when I kiss him, the smell of my wife’s body,” says Jean-Michel Maillard.
Anosmia — the loss of one’s sense of smell — may be an invisible handicap, but is psychologically difficult to live with and has no real treatment, he says.
And it is the price that an increasing number of people are paying after surviving a brush with the coronavirus, with some facing a seemingly long-term inability to smell.
“Anosmia cuts you off from the smells of life, it’s a torture,” says Maillard, president of anosmie.org, a French group designed to help sufferers.
If you have the condition you can no longer breathe in the smell of your first morning coffee, smell the cut grass of a freshly mown lawn or even “the reassuring smell of soap on your skin when you’re preparing for a meeting,” he says.
You only truly become aware of your sense of smell when you lose it, says Maillard, who lost his own following an accident.
And it is not just the olfactory pleasures you lose. He points out that people with anosmia are unable to smell smoke from a fire, gas from a leak, or a poorly washed dustbin.
Eating is a completely different experience too, as so much of what we appreciate in food is what we can smell, says Alain Corre, an ear, nose and throat specialist at the Hopital-Fondation Rothschild in Paris.

“There are dozens of causes of anosmia,” he says, including nasal polyps, chronic rhinitis, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.
Now the new coronavirus has been added to that list, says Corre — with the symptom alone allowing a diagnosis of COVID-19 in some cases.
“When people lose their sense of smell and don’t get it back, we note a real change in the quality of life and a level of depression that is not insignificant,” he adds.
The problem is when the condition persists, he says.
“To be deprived of your sense of smell for a month, it’s not serious,” says Maillard. “Two months, it starts to become a problem. But after six months, you’re all alone under a bell jar.
“There’s a psychological aspect to this which is very difficult to live with,” he insists. “You need to get help.”

CovidORL study
There is no specific treatment for the condition.
You have to address the cause, says Corre, but “the problem of the anosmias linked to the virus is that often, the treatment of the viral infection has no effect on your smell.
“According to the first numbers, around 80 percent of patients suffering from COVID-19 recover spontaneously in less than a month and often even faster, in eight to 10 days.”
For others, however, it could be that the disease has destroyed their olfactory neurons — the ones that detect smells. The good news is that these neurons, at the back of the nose, are able to regenerate.
Two Paris hospitals, Rothschild and Lariboisiere, have launched a “CovidORL” study to investigate the phenomenon, testing how well different nose washes can cure anosmia.
One cortisone-based treatment has proved effective in treating post-cold instances of anosmia and offers some hope, says Corre.
Another way to approach the condition is through olfactory re-education, to try to stimulate the associations that specific smells have in your memory, he says.
His advice is to choose five smells in your kitchen that are special to you, that you really like: cinnamon say, or thyme. Breathe them in twice a day for five to 10 minutes while looking at what it is you are inhaling.
Anosmie.org has even put together a re-education program using essential oils, working with Hirac Gurden, director of neuroscience research at the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). It is based on the work of Dresden-based researcher Thomas Hummel.
“As early as March, we got several hundred phone calls, emails from people who had COVID and who were calling for help because they couldn’t smell anything any more,” says Gurden.
Maillard meanwhile finished his re-education program last winter, using four smells.
“Today, I have 10 of them,” he says, including fish, cigarettes and rose essential oil. “I’ve even found a perfume that I can smell!” he declares.