7 awkward things about email you need to stop doing

7 awkward things about email you need to stop doing
Updated 20 April 2014

7 awkward things about email you need to stop doing

7 awkward things about email you need to stop doing

You send and receive emails every single day. As with everything else in life, you may be using email incorrectly, or let’s say awkwardly. In order to make sure that you’re not abusing email, read our list of awkward things you need to stop doing right now:

1 - You sign off your emails in a weird way

For formal emails, you can use various autofills such as Best Regards, Take care, Thanks, etc . Close people like your friends need no sign-off at all.

But it would be weird if you sign your emails with “xoxo”, which is apparently an appropriate sign off for some people! Another weird sign off I’ve seen is the first letter of the sender’s name.

2 - You respond late to chain emails

We all receive chain emails, maybe everyday even. It becomes awkward when you receive an email that has been sent to 10 people about a possible lunch together or even a joke, and you decide to reply to it a week later, after everyone else has responded.

3 - You don’t know how to greet others

Same thing as the sign off etiquette, you can’t start a formal email by “Hey” or without a greeting. And it’s just as awkward if you address your close friend with “Dear”.

4 - You write your emails in all caps

What many don’t understand, is that using the Caps Lock button makes you look horrible not only your email. It’s like you’re shouting for some weird reason that no one can understand. Avoid writing in all caps at all cost.

5 -  You hit the “Reply all” button when replying to all your emails

One can’t over stress the importance of NOT hitting the “Reply all” button without thinking. Nothing can be more awkward than writing something intended for only one person to read but have it sent to an entire list of people.

6 - You make typos, skip punctuation or capitals

Grammar is important, so is capital letters at the beginning of each sentence. Using punctuations appropriately is not a plus, it’s essential for formal emails. Avoid exclamation marks but if you must, use it only once or else you’ll be seen as too emotional or exaggerating.

7 - You respond to long emails with much shorter responses

For work or personal correspondence; take into consideration how long is the email and what is expected from you. Replying with a much shorter email makes the sender feel ignored or misunderstood. Make sure you read your email carefully and respond to the major points presented by the sender.

What other things you wish people would stop doing regarding email?


Alibaba facial recognition tech specifically picks out China’s Muslim Uighur minority

Alibaba facial recognition tech specifically picks out China’s Muslim Uighur minority
Updated 18 December 2020

Alibaba facial recognition tech specifically picks out China’s Muslim Uighur minority

Alibaba facial recognition tech specifically picks out China’s Muslim Uighur minority
  • Alibaba itself said it was “dismayed” a unit developed software which can tag ethnicity in videos
  • Alibaba is the biggest cloud computing vendor in China and the fourth worldwide

SHANGHAI: Technology giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. has facial recognition technology which can specifically pick out members of China’s Uighur minority, surveillance industry researcher IPVM said in a report.
Alibaba itself said it was “dismayed” a unit developed software which can tag ethnicity in videos, and that the feature was never intended to be deployed to customers.
The report comes as human rights groups accuse China of forcing over 1 million Muslim Uighurs into labor camps in the region of Xinjiang, and call out firms suspected of complicity.
China has repeatedly denied forcing anyone into what it has called vocational training centers, and has also said Xinjiang is under threat from Islamist militants.
Still, sensitivities have prompted caution among Chinese Internet firms which often self-censor to avoid running afoul of a government which strictly controls online speech, and which last month published draft rules to police livestreaming.
US-based IPVM in a report published on Wednesday said software capable of identifying Uighurs appears in Alibaba’s Cloud Shield content moderation service for websites.
Alibaba describes Cloud Shield as a system that “detects and recognizes text, pictures, videos, and voices containing pornography, politics, violent terrorism, advertisements, and spam, and provides verification, marking, custom configuration and other capabilities.”
An archived record of the technology https://perma.cc/9ZUV-UD2F shows it can perform such tasks as “glasses inspection,” “smile detection,” whether the subject is “ethnic” and, specifically, “Is it Uighur.”
Consequently, if a Uighur livestreams a video on a website signed up to Cloud Shield, the software can detect that the user is Uighur and flag the video for review or removal, IPVM researcher Charles Rollet told Reuters.
IPVM said mention of Uighurs in the software disappeared near the time it published its report.
Alibaba in a statement said it was “dismayed” that Alibaba Cloud developed facial recognition software that includes ethnicity as an attribute for tagging video imagery, and that it never intended the software to be used in this manner. The feature was “trial technology” not intended for customers.
Alibaba did not mention Uighurs in its statement.
“We have eliminated any ethnic tag in our product offering,” an Alibaba spokeswoman told Reuters.
Alibaba is listed on both the New York and Hong Kong stock exchanges. It is the biggest cloud computing vendor in China and the fourth worldwide, showed data from researcher Canalys.
Earlier this month, US lawmakers sent letters to Intel Corp. and Nvidia Corp. following reports of their computer chips being used in the surveillance of Uighurs.