Most German employers happy with refugees’ work — survey

German Minister for Defense Ursula von der Leyen (C) follows a masonry works beside a Syrian refugee (R) and a German army (Bundeswehr) instructor (L) during a visit at the education center of the engineer forces of the German army Bundeswehr in Ingolstadt, southern Germany, on September 1, 2016. (AFP)
Updated 14 March 2017

Most German employers happy with refugees’ work — survey

FRANKFURT: A large majority of German companies who have taken on refugees are satisfied with their work, although most hires have been for low-skilled positions, according to a survey conducted last month and published on Tuesday.
The first of the estimated 1.2 million people who arrived in Germany in 2015 and 2016 from countries including Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan are starting to enter the labor market. About 14 percent have found a job.
More than three-quarters of the employers who took part in the survey said they had only few or no difficulties in daily work with the refugees they had hired.
Those who did have difficulties most frequently cited a lack of German-language skills, vocational skills, different work habits and uncertainty relating to the length of the employee’s stay in Germany.
The influx of migrants has eroded the popularity of Chancellor Angela Merkel and fueled the rise of the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party, although support for refugees remains strong in many parts of society.
The survey of 2,200 German employers was carried out by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Association of German Chambers of Commerce and Industry and the German ministry of labor and social affairs.
Numbers of native Germans entering the German workforce are beginning to slow as the population ages.
Coupled with an unemployment rate of just 5.9 percent, the lowest since German reunification in 1990 and one of the lowest in the OECD, that makes for one of the world’s most favorable job markets for new arrivals, the OECD said.


Ethiopia says suspects confessed to killing popular singer

Updated 10 July 2020

Ethiopia says suspects confessed to killing popular singer

  • Hachala Hundessa became a symbol of the Oromo struggle during years of anti-government protests that swept Abiy to power in 2018
  • Though Abiy is Ethiopia’s first Oromo head of state, Oromo nationalists accuse him of insufficiently championing their interests since taking office

ADDIS ABABA: Ethiopia’s attorney general said Friday that two men had confessed to killing a popular singer from the Oromo ethnic group as part of a plot to topple Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s government.
Hachala Hundessa became a symbol of the Oromo struggle during years of anti-government protests that swept Abiy to power in 2018.
His shooting death last week sparked days of protests and ethnic violence that killed 239 people, according to police figures.
“The assassination was intended to be a cover to take power from the incumbent by force,” attorney general Abebech Abbebe said in a statement Friday aired on state television, without providing details.
Though Abiy is Ethiopia’s first Oromo head of state, Oromo nationalists accuse him of insufficiently championing their interests since taking office, a complaint echoed by many protesters last week.
Abebech said that along with the two men who have allegedly confessed to the crime, the government has identified a third suspect who remains on the run.
One of the men in custody identified the masterminds of the alleged plot as members of a rebel group the government believes is affiliated with the opposition Oromo Liberation Front (OLF) political party, Abebech said.
The OLF, a former rebel movement, returned to Ethiopia from exile after Abiy took office and has repeatedly disavowed any links to armed insurgents.
The Internet remained shut off Friday for an 11th consecutive day, though Addis Ababa remains calm and Abiy’s office issued a statement saying the surrounding Oromia region had “returned to calm and citizens have resumed normal activities.”
In her statement, however, Abebech said unnamed agitators were calling for additional protests and road blockages in the coming days.
“There are those that have hidden themselves in nice places but are calling on Ethiopian youth to fight each other, close roads and to cease working as part of a rebellion call,” Abebech said.
“Above all we call on our people to disobey this rebellion call and to thwart it.”