Fulani herdsmen kill eight in central Nigeria

Soldiers stand guard at the boarder in Gamboru Ngala, Borno, Nigeria, in this April 27, 2017 photo. (REUTERS)
Updated 09 May 2017

Fulani herdsmen kill eight in central Nigeria

LAGOS: Gunmen believed to be nomadic Fulani herdsmen killed eight people in central Nigeria, police said Tuesday, in the latest violence over grazing and land rights.
The attack on two farming villages in the Logo local government area of Benue state happened overnight Sunday to Monday, state police commissioner Bashir Makama told AFP.
“Eight people were killed by Fulani cattle rearers who invaded the two farming villages,” he added. Trouble erupted when the villagers — who are predominantly farmers — tried to prevent the herdsmen from moving their cattle through their farms, Makama said.
Newspapers said between 10 and 20 people were killed in the attack, which is the latest in a region plagued by the long-running conflict.
In March, at least 17 people, mostly women and children, were killed in similar violence in Benue state, which lies in the religiously mixed Middle Belt but is predominantly Christian.
The worst such violence occurred in February 2016 when hundreds of people were said to have been killed and about 1,000 homes destroyed in the Agatu area of the state.
President Muhammadu Buhari, a Hausa-speaking Fulani from Muslim majority northern Nigeria, has proposed the creation of grazing land to prevent further clashes.


UK sees rise in Islamist extremist cases referred to counter radicalization program

Updated 8 min 55 sec ago

UK sees rise in Islamist extremist cases referred to counter radicalization program

  • Cases involving Islamist extremism increase for first time in four years
  • Program aims to spot people who could go on to commit terrorist acts

LONDON: The number of people referred to the UK government’s counter extremism program has jumped amid concerns over increased radicalization among young people.
Cases involving Islamist extremism increased by 6 percent from 1,404 to 1,487. The numbers, which represent individuals of concern referred to the Prevent scheme between April 2019 and March 2020, mark the first year-on-year increase for Islamist cases since 2016.
While far-right cases remained steady compared to the previous year at 1,388, overall the number of people referred to the program rose 10 percent.
The rise in Islamist cases comes after a recent surge of attacks across Europe. Last month a school teacher was beheaded by an extremist after he had shown his class cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in a freedom of speech discussion. Days later, three people were killed in a terrorist attack at a church in Nice.
In the UK, three people were killed in a knife attack on London Bridge almost a year ago.
The UK’s Prevent program is part of its wider counter-terrorism strategy and aims to safeguard people from becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism.
The most serious cases are referred to a panel known as “Channel,” which then decides what further action to take. Of the 697 cases that reached the panel, most were related to the far-right (302), while 210 were linked to Islamist extremism. 
More than half of all referrals were aged under 20.
Security Minister James Brokenshire said the Prevent strategy was an essential strand to the UK’s counter-terror strategy.
“It is about supporting vulnerable individuals, steering them away from terrorism, and protecting our communities,” he told the Royal United Services Institute on Thursday.
Last week the head of counter-terror policing in the UK, Neil Basu, said that while Islamist terrorists remained the greatest threat to Britain, the far right is growing faster.
He said COVID-19 had created a “perfect storm” with young and vulnerable people spending more time alone and online.