Daesh claims responsibility for Egypt bus attack

Relatives of killed Coptic Christians grieve during their funeral at Abu Garnous Cathedral in Minya, Egypt, Friday, May 26, 2017. (AP)
Updated 27 May 2017

Daesh claims responsibility for Egypt bus attack

CAIRO: Daesh group has claimed responsibility for an attack on Coptic Christians traveling to a remote desert monastery south of Cairo that killed 29.
The group’s news agency, Aamaq, said on Saturday that an Daesh unit targeted the bus the previous day and put the death toll at 32.
The discrepancy in casualty figures is not uncommon in the aftermath of major attacks by the militants, who have been waging an insurgency centered at northern Sinai, though attacks on the mainland have recently increased.
Egypt responded to the attack, the fourth since December by Daesh to target Christians, with airstrikes against what the military says are bases in eastern Libya in which the militants have been trained.
Egyptian authorities say the death toll in the ambush attack on a bus transporting Christians to a monastery south of Cairo has risen to 29.
The Egyptian Cabinet said in a news release that 13 victims of Friday’s attack remain hospitalized in Cairo and the southern city of Minya where the attack took place. Authorities had previously said 28 were killed.
The attack came on the eve of the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. It was the fourth to target the country’s Christian minority since December.
Egypt’s President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi said that suspected Daesh group militants attacked the bus and that Egypt had launched airstrikes against what he said were militant training bases in Libya.


Turkish police arrest journalist Altan a week after his release

Updated 13 November 2019

Turkish police arrest journalist Altan a week after his release

  • Altan and the others deny the charges against them
  • On Tuesday a higher court overruled the decision to release Altan, ordering his arrest on grounds that there was a risk of him fleeing

ISTANBUL: Turkish police detained prominent journalist and author Ahmet Altan late on Tuesday, a week after he was released from prison in his retrial on coup-related charges, Istanbul police said.

Before his release last Monday, the 69-year-old had been in jail since his arrest in 2016, two months after an attempted coup which Ankara says was orchestrated by the network of US-based Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen.

The journalist’s case has drawn criticism from human rights groups and Turkey’s Western allies. They are concerned by the scale of a post-coup crackdown against suspected Gulen supporters under President Tayyip Erdogan.

Altan smiled and waved as he was driven away by counter-terror squad police officers after being taken from his home in Istanbul, video and photos published by Turkish media showed.

He was taken to Istanbul police headquarters after a hospital check-up, state-owned Anadolu news agency reported.

Altan, his brother and other journalists were previously sentenced to life in jail for aiding Gulen’s network. Last week he was convicted again in a retrial, but released from jail given the time served.

Altan and the others deny the charges against them.

On Tuesday a higher court overruled the decision to release Altan, ordering his arrest on grounds that there was a risk of him fleeing, Anadolu reported.

Under last week’s verdict, Altan was sentenced to 10 years and six months in jail. Turkey’s high court had overruled the previous life sentences against him in July, sending the file back for re-trial.

Erdogan’s government has jailed more than 77,000 people pending trial since the failed putsch. Widespread arrests are still routine in a crackdown critics say demonstrates growing autocracy in Turkey.

Gulen, who has lived in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania since 1999, and his followers deny any involvement in the coup. Turkey has repeatedly called on the United States to extradite the cleric.