UN Security Council tells Qatar to mend fences with Gulf neighbors

China's United Nations Ambassador Liu Jieyi speaks during a UN Security Council meeting at UN headquarters on June 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
Updated 03 July 2017

UN Security Council tells Qatar to mend fences with Gulf neighbors

UNITED NATIONS: The UN Security Council has told Qatar to sort out its differences with its Gulf neighbors, China’s ambassador said Monday, indicating the top UN body would not get involved in the dispute.
Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al-Thani met with Security Council members on Friday to discuss the rupture in ties with Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt.
Chinese Ambassador Liu Jieyi, who holds the council presidency this month, said “the best way would be (that) the countries concerned work out a solution through dialogue and through consultations among themselves, because we don’t see any other alternative to that.”
“Whatever the countries can do to mend the fences and to get back to good neighborly relations, that would certainly be welcomed by China,” said Liu.
Al-Jazeera reported that the foreign minister had asked Security Council members to urge Saudi-led nations to lift restrictions on the use of airspace and other transportation links with Qatar.
Saudi Arabia and its allies announced on June 5 they were severing ties with Qatar and later put forward a list of 13 demands.
They accuse Qatar of supporting extremism and of being too close to Iran, which Doha has strongly denied.
The demands included Doha ending support for the Muslim Brotherhood, closing Al-Jazeera, downgrading diplomatic ties with Iran and shutting down a Turkish military base in the emirate.
Sheikh Mohammed had earlier said the list of demands was “made to be rejected” and on Monday British lawyers for Qatar denounced the demands as “an affront to international law.”


Wife of White Helmets co-founder Le Mesurier banned from leaving Turkey

Updated 21 min 30 sec ago

Wife of White Helmets co-founder Le Mesurier banned from leaving Turkey

  • Winberg will not be allowed to leave the country, as long as the investigation into her husband’s death continues
  • The preliminary autopsy reports suggest suicide was the most likely cause of death, with the final report set to be completed next week

ISTANBUL: Turkey has imposed a travel ban on Emma Winberg, the wife of James Le Mesurier, founder of the Mayday Rescue Foundation, who was found dead in Istanbul on Monday.
Speculation abounds over the circumstances of Le Mesurier’s death, with questions over whether the former British intelligence officer was murdered or committed suicide.
Though Turkish police sources believe Le Mesurier jumped to his death from his flat, his wife, 39, has not been allowed to return home because of Turkish law.
Le Mesurier had reportedly told his wife of suicidal thoughts two weeks before the incident. His wife notified the police that he was in a deteriorating psychological state and taking anti-depressants and medication for stress. His hospital records are also being examined.
Umur Yildirim, an attorney specialized in criminal justice, said that according to Turkish law, it was possible for Turkish authorities to impose a travel ban on people not of Turkish nationality of importance to an open investigation.  
Winberg will not be allowed to leave the country, as long as the investigation into her husband’s death continues.
Based on reports, Le Mesurier’s residence was only accessible via fingerprint, and in testimony released by Turkish authorities, Winberg claimed the pair had taken sleeping pills at around 4 a.m.the night before. She was woken by police after they were notified of a body lying outside the building.
The preliminary autopsy reports suggest suicide was the most likely cause of death, with the final report set to be completed next week. The investigation continues.
Le Mesurier was awarded an Order of the British Empire (OBE) by the UK government in 2016.