Dubai authorities propose crackdown on “massage service” card vendors

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“Massage” service cards left on a car in Dubai (YouTube)
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“Massage” service cards left on a car in Dubai (Twitter)
Updated 16 August 2017

Dubai authorities propose crackdown on “massage service” card vendors

DUBAI: Anyone who has driven to Dubai and parked in districts such as Barsha and Barsha Heights will be all too familiar with the experience of finding various business cards advertising apparent “massage” services left on the car windows.
But this could soon be a thing of the past with new rules proposed by Dubai authorities that would see venders face stricter fines of up to 10,000 dirhams ($2,720) and immediate deportation.
In some districts in Dubai it is not uncommon for a motorist to park their vehicle, leave it for a few minutes, and return to find a selection of various cards advertising massage services, with photographs of women in various forms of undress.
The cards are left on vehicles by small teams, or individuals, who walk around the streets, quickly leaving an assortment of the offending items on the windows.
Abdul Majeed Abdul Aziz Al-Saifaie, director of the Waste Management Department, told UAE daily Gulf News that his department has drafted proposals requesting the amending of existing rules.
Under the new proposals people caught leaving the cards on vehicles, or at people’s apartments would face immediate deportation.
A fine of 10,000 dirhams would be imposed on licensed massage parlors committing the offense – the fine is currently 500 dirhams ($27).
Al-Saifaie said in many cases the people leaving the cards were also breaching residency laws.
“They don’t have resident visas or they are here on visit visas looking for jobs. So, our proposal is to deport them immediately,” he explained.
The proposals follow an ongoing battle against the problem, which has been the cause for thousands of complaints from residents who are fed up with finding the various cards left on their vehicles, or pushed under the doors of their apartments, often being picked up by young children.


Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

Updated 13 November 2019

Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

ATHENS, Greece: An ancient Greek cup awarded as a prize to the marathon winner in the first modern Olympics of 1896 has been returned to Athens from a German university.
Greece’s Culture Ministry says the 6th century B.C. pottery vessel was considered lost for decades until research in 2014 by archaeologist Giorgos Kavvadias identified it in the University of Muenster’s collections.
A ministry statement says it was proved “beyond any doubt” that the two-handled cup painted with ancient runners was the one given to Spiros Louis, the Greek marathon victor in 1896.
Following correspondence with Greek officials, the university agreed to return the cup, which was part of a private German collection it had bought in 1986.
The vessel was presented at a ceremony Wednesday at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.