Irma death toll in St. Maarten climbs to four: Dutch PM

A palm tree lays on a car after the passage of Hurricane Irma, near the shore in Marigot, on the island of St. Martin on Saturday, September 9, 2017. (File photo by AP)
Updated 10 September 2017

Irma death toll in St. Maarten climbs to four: Dutch PM

THE HAGUE, Netherlands: Four people are now known to have died in the Dutch Caribbean island of Sint Maarten when it was hit by Hurricane Irma, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said Sunday.
“Unfortunately, there were two more victims that we did not know about earlier,” Rutte told reporters, adding the death toll from Wednesday’s storm in the Dutch part of St. Martin was now four. But he added there had been “no new damage” caused by Jose which whipped past the island shared with France late Saturday.


Amazon indigenous leaders accuse Brazil of ‘genocide’ policy

Updated 18 January 2020

Amazon indigenous leaders accuse Brazil of ‘genocide’ policy

  • Hundreds of elders gathered this week at Pairacu, deep in the rainforest, to form a united front against Bolsonaro’s environmental policies
  • “We do not accept mining on our lands, loggers, illegal fishermen or hydroelectricity. We are opposed to anything that destroys the forest,” a leader said

PIARACU: Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s pledge to open up the Amazon to mining companies was tantamount to “genocide,” indigenous leaders said Friday at a meeting to oppose the government’s environmental policies.
Hundreds of elders gathered this week at Pairacu, deep in the rainforest, to form a united front against Bolsonaro’s environmental policies, which have seen deforestation in the jungle nearly double since the Brazilian leader came to power a year ago.
“Our aim was to join forces and denounce the fact that the Brazilian government’s political policy of genocide, ethnocide and ecocide is under way,” the group said in a draft manifesto drawn up at the end of the summit.
“We do not accept mining on our lands, loggers, illegal fishermen or hydroelectricity. We are opposed to anything that destroys the forest,” the text said.
They also said that “government threats and hate speech” had encouraged violence against Amazon communities and demanded punishment for the murder of indigenous leaders.
At least eight indigenous leaders were killed last year.
Brazil’s leading indigenous chief, Raoni Metuktire, said Thursday he would personally travel to the capital Brasilia to present the meeting’s demands to Congress.
“Over there, I’m going to ask Bolsonaro why he speaks so badly about the indigenous peoples,” said the 89-year-old leader of the Kayapo tribe.
Preliminary data collected by the National Institute for Space Research showed an 85 percent increase in Amazon deforestation last year when compared to 2018.