Algerian, Pakistani and Burkina Faso pilgrims attend Makkah festival

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Muslims from Burkina Faso, Algeria and Pakistan attend the festival which included a short movie about Makkah and its historical role in hosting pilgrims.
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Muslims from Burkina Faso, Algeria and Pakistan attend the festival which included a short movie about Makkah and its historical role in hosting pilgrims.
Updated 17 September 2017

Algerian, Pakistani and Burkina Faso pilgrims attend Makkah festival

MAKKAH: Al-Nuzhah neighborhood center held a festival earlier this week to welcome pilgrims from different countries.
Muslims from Burkina Faso, Algeria and Pakistan attended the festival which included a short movie about Makkah and its historical role in hosting pilgrims.
Adel Hafez, the festival organizer, told Arab News that the pilgrims were able to learn about local culture through the event and recognize the historical value of Makkah’s cultural heritage.
Makkah is rich in historical scenes and full of events which have rich cultural significance, of which all pilgrims should be aware, Hafez said.
He pointed out that the relationship between pilgrims and Makkah as a city should not be only by performing the rituals but they should have access to Makkah’s cultural history.
“Whenever you look at Makkah, you will see historical resources and archaeological publications, museums, and archaeological culture,” Hafez added.
He said that they have dedicated this festival to present a brief overview of Makkah culture and heritage where they can focus on folklore.
“We showed them Makkah from the past and present to let them know how our ancestors lived and how they served pilgrims,” he pointed out.
“We showed them a movie that talks about different historical periods and how Makkah’s people had to help pilgrims, plus, the show explained all the efforts of the Saudi government accorded to pilgrims.”
The festival included a competition to recognize the voices of Al-Haram muezzins — people who call prayers — who had interacted among the arrivals from Pakistan, Burkina Faso and Algeria.
Khalid Mushtag, a Pakistani pilgrim, said: “We appreciate the fantastic show and learned a lot about Makkah’s culture. It also gave us an opportunity to have a cultural exchange which enriched everyone who came.”


Passionate Saudi musicians Jwa ready to take the world by storm

The group has plans to perform in Jordan, Egypt, Dubai and Bahrain, as it awaits the release of its first album before exploring new horizons. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 19 February 2020

Passionate Saudi musicians Jwa ready to take the world by storm

  • Jwa’s first album is due to be released on Feb. 25
  • The word “jwa” in Arabic means the “highest levels of passion and love,” which embodies how the quintet feel about Indie music — the thing that brought them together

RIYADH: The music scene in the Kingdom is exploding, with young, talented Saudis taking full advantage of the developments in the country by showcasing their talent.
 In a limited time, young Saudi musicians have proven that they are equal to any other young cohort of musicians anywhere in the world.
 One of those talents is a young band from Dhahran, Jwa. Currently performing locally in Riyadh, Jeddah and other cities in the Eastern Province, the group has plans to perform in Jordan, Egypt, Dubai and Bahrain, as it awaits the release of its first album before exploring new horizons.
 The band, formed in 2018, is composed of Methgal Al-Shammari on drums, Mohammad Al-Nahas (bass and vocals), Arkan Al-Zahrani (guitar), Mansour Al-Gallaf (guitar) and Fawaz Baasem (keyboard).
They have had two local hit singles, “Ya Safina” and “Min Jadeed.” Methgal and Mohammad, the founders of Jwa, say that at first they “performed at numerous local events and parties” across the Kingdom. It did not take them long to become popular among Saudis.

FASTFACTS

• Jwa was formed in 2018.

• Since its launch it has two local hit singles.

• The band’s first album is due to be released on Feb. 25.

The word “jwa” in Arabic means the “highest levels of passion and love,” which embodies how the quintet feel about Indie music — the thing that brought them together.
However, they have faced many challenges in the last two years. Methgal and Mohammad said initially a “lack of support for independent bands” and “weakness of the nurturing music environment” within the country halted their progress.
However, due to the steps taken by the General Entertainment Authority, bands like Jwa have become able to make their voices and music heard. In the future, they are looking to go international, to “make their band known not only to different regions of Saudi Arabia but also abroad to gain more momentum and attraction.”
Jwa’s first album is due to be released on Feb. 25.