Advertising ghosts reappear in Sydney as buildings come down

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An iconic Australian brand Peters ice cream, dating back to the 19th and early 20th centuries, is seen in the central business district of Sydney. (AFP)
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Above, an advertisement of an old iconic Australian brand Peapes seen after demolition of a tower block on George Street in the central business district of Sydney. (AFP)
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A woman looks at the pictures of the old Sydney in the central business district of Sydney. (AFP)
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An old advertisement appears following a demolition of a building in the central business district of Sydney. (AFP)
Updated 21 September 2017

Advertising ghosts reappear in Sydney as buildings come down

SYDNEY: Historic adverts are re-emerging on the side of Sydney buildings to offer a brief window into the city’s past, with old paintings exposed as neighboring structures are pulled down.
Old banners from well-known Australian brands dating back to the 19th and early-20th centuries have reappeared, including Peters Ice Cream, offering a romantic reminder for those who can remember them in their heyday.
International names like Shell Oil are also having old painted signs uncovered thanks to city construction, with some being restored to their former glory, including a prominent Bushells Tea advert in Sydney’s historic Rocks district.
“I think Sydney is often perceived as a modern city with very little history, and I think for some Sydneysiders it (re-emerging signs) is an interesting reminder that the city has evolved over time,” Sydney historian Lisa Murray said.
A brightly-colored six-story advert for “Peapes Mens and Boys Wear”, which likely dates back to 1923 when the building it is painted on was erected, is the most recent to grab attention after an adjacent block came down as part of a redevelopment.
“The colors of the paint and the vibrancy of it is actually conserved by default, by the fact that it has been covered up,” Murray said.
The former gentlemen’s department store was a landmark in the city’s Wynyard area – a key retail hub until the Sydney Harbor Bridge opened in 1932 directing traffic elsewhere, the historian added.
“A city is never static – they grow, they change, buildings go up and they go down, businesses come and go – and it is nice to sometimes be reminded of our history and reflect on how they change over time,” said Murray.


Sumatran tiger kills farmer in Indonesia

Updated 13 December 2019

Sumatran tiger kills farmer in Indonesia

  • Tigers mauled to death another coffee farmer and seriously injured two Indonesian tourists in separate incidents in the province last month
  • Human-animal conflicts are common in the vast Southeast Asian archipelago, especially in areas where the clearing of rainforest is destroying animal habitats

PALEMBANG, Indonesia: A Sumatran tiger has killed an Indonesian farmer, police said Friday, in the third fatal attack by the critically endangered species in less than a month.
The 55-year-old was set upon by the big cat at a coffee plantation in South Sumatra province on Thursday.
Authorities said the dead man’s companion screamed in vain to warn him about the approaching predator.
“All of sudden, the tiger pounced on the victim,” local police chief Ferry Harahap told AFP on Friday.
The deadly attack comes just a week after a tiger killed another farmer in nearby Pagaralam.
Tigers mauled to death another coffee farmer and seriously injured two Indonesian tourists in separate incidents in the province last month.
Local conservation agency official Martialis Puspito blamed human encroachment on the endangered animal’s habitat for the spate of attacks, adding that residents were being warned to steer clear of the wilderness.
“We cannot drive out the tigers because the jungles are their habitat so it’s people who have to stay out of there,” he said.
Human-animal conflicts are common in the vast Southeast Asian archipelago, especially in areas where the clearing of rainforest to make way for palm oil plantations is destroying animal habitats.
Sumatran tigers are considered critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, with fewer than 400 believed to remain in the wild.