Child obesity grows tenfold since 1975: study

An overweight child wears a sweat-shirt reading the word "Style", in this October 9, 2017 photo, in Postdam, eastern Germany. (AFP)
Updated 11 October 2017

Child obesity grows tenfold since 1975: study

PARIS: The world had 10 times as many obese children and teenagers last year than in 1975, but underweight kids still outnumbered them, a study said Wednesday.
Warning of a “double burden” of malnutrition, researchers said the rate of increase in obesity far outstripped the decline in under-nutrition.
“If post-2000 trends continue, child and adolescent obesity is expected to surpass moderate and severe underweight by 2022,” researchers wrote in The Lancet medical journal.
The team found that there were 74 million obese boys aged 5-19 in 2016, up from six million four decades earlier.
For girls, the tally swelled from five million to 50 million.
By comparison, there were 117 million underweight boys and 75 million underweight girls last year after the number peaked around the year 2000, the study said.
Almost two thirds of the underweight children lived in south Asia.
Obesity ballooned in every region in the world, while the number of underweight children slowly decreased everywhere except south and southeast Asia, and central, east and west Africa.
The prevalence of underweight children decreased from 9.2 percent to 8.4 percent of girls aged 5-19 over the study period, and from 14.8 percent to 12.4 percent in boys.
Obesity grew from 0.7 percent to 5.6 percent among girls and from 0.9 percent to 7.8 percent in boys.
In Nauru, the Cook Islands and Palau, more than 30 percent of children and teenagers were obese in 2016.
In some countries in Polynesia and Micronesia, the Middle East, North Africa, the Caribbean and the United States, more than one in five children were obese.

Experts divide people into body mass categories calculated on the basis of their weight-to-height ratio. These range from underweight, normal weight, overweight and three categories of obese.
Obesity comes with the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, while underweight children are more at risk from infectious diseases.
Children in either category can be stunted if their diet does not include healthy nutrients.
“There is a continued need for policies that enhance food security in low-income countries and households, especially in south Asia,” said study author Majid Ezzati from Imperial College London.
“But our data also shows that the transition from underweight to overweight and obesity can happen quickly in an unhealthy nutritional transition with an increase in nutrient-poor, energy-dense foods.”
The team used the height and weight data of 129 million people older than five to estimate body mass trends for 200 countries from 1975 to 2016.
While obesity in children and teens appears to have plateaued in rich countries, its rise continued in low- and middle-income countries, they found.
“Very few policies and programs attempt to make healthy foods such as whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables affordable to poor families,” Ezzati said in a statement.
“Unaffordability of healthy food options to the poor can lead to social inequalities in obesity, and limit how much we can reduce its burden.”
 


Kemetic yoga breathes new life into Egyptian tourism

Updated 18 October 2019

Kemetic yoga breathes new life into Egyptian tourism

  • Egyptian temples have wall carvings which play a major role in the development of Kemitic yoga
  • Kemetic yoga is a blend of physical movements, meditation and controlled breathing

CAIRO: Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism has collaborated with CNN to produce and air a short film about Kemetic yoga to highlight wellness tourism in the country.

Kemetic yoga is a blend of physical movements, meditation and controlled breathing.

The three-minute film was shot in Luxor and follows Sarah Wesley, a certified Kemetic yoga instructor.

“The origins of Kemetic yoga started in the land called Kemit and Kemit is the ancient name of Egypt,” Wesley said.

Egyptian temples have wall carvings which play a major role in the development of Kemitic yoga, along with the study and interpretations of hieroglyphic texts on the subject.

Wesley practices yoga mainly at Karnak Temple, which she described as being full of powerful and peaceful energy.

The practice mainly targets people who want to discover more about themselves and those who wish to expand their consciousness.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Breathing is a significant aspect in all forms of yoga but with Kemetic yoga it is enhanced and highlighted. It is also much slower than other forms of yoga.

• This type of yoga is different to others, as it focuses on breathing rather than poses.

“I hope that the future of Kemetic yoga can reach as many people as possible,” Wesley said.

This type of yoga is different to others, as it focuses on breathing rather than poses.

Breathing is a significant aspect in all forms of yoga but with Kemetic yoga it is enhanced and highlighted. It is also much slower than other forms of yoga.

Kemetic yoga is more than imitating the poses of the gods which have remained eternal due to the carvings on the temple walls. It is a philosophy that aims for self-development.

Kemetic yoga aims to showcase a different side of tourism in Egypt. The film, “Yoga in Egypt,” is one aspect of a partnership between CNN and the ministry, which has launched an international tourism campaign. 

The campaign aims to promote tourism in Egypt by showcasing the country in a different light and changing perceptions about it.

Last month the ministry said it was working with social media influencers to promote Egypt as a travel destination, Al-Ahram newspaper reported.