MoH shares Hajj experience in global mass gatherings medical conference

Health Minister Tawfiq Al-Rabiah attends the International Conference for Mass Gatherings Medicine in Riyadh on Tuesday. (SPA)
Updated 25 October 2017

MoH shares Hajj experience in global mass gatherings medical conference

RIYADH: Saudi Minister of Health Tawfiq Al-Rabiah stressed that the Kingdom is one of the leading references in the area of mass gatherings medicine and management, with its well-known experiences in this field.
His statement came during the inauguration of the third International Conference for Mass Gatherings Medicine on Tuesday, which was held under the auspices of King Salman, and organized by the Ministry of Health at Al-Faisal University in Riyadh.
Al-Rabiah said that the ministry and its officials give their utmost attention to providing the best health care services during Hajj season according to an annual plan implemented in different stages, which begin well before the start of Hajj season.
He added: “This scientific gathering is of utmost importance because it coincides with the policy of making public health a priority in all laws and regulations for fighting preventing diseases.”
This, according to Al-Rabiah, comes in line with Vision 2030 which offers a comprehensive strategy for Hajj and Umrah, aiming to increase the capacity of receiving pilgrims from 8 to 15 million a year by 2020, then to 30 million by 2030.
 


Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

Updated 2 min 12 sec ago

Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

  • The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen
  • ‘Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors’

JEDDAH: Baghdad on Sunday denied any link to drone attacks on Saudi oil plants, after media speculation that the strikes were launched from Iraq despite being claimed by Yemeni rebels.
The attacks early Saturday targeted two key oil installations, causing massive fires and taking out half of the Kingdom’s vast oil output.
The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi militia in Yemen, where an Arab coalition has been fighting to restore the internationally recognized government.
But the Wall Street Journal å reported that officials were investigating the possibility the attacks involved missiles launched from Iraq or Iran.
Kuwait is investigating the sighting of a drone over its territory and is coordinating with Saudi Arabia and other countries, the cabinet said on Sunday.
“The security leadership has started the necessary investigations over the sighting of a drone over the coastline of Kuwait City and what measures were taken to confront it,” the cabinet said on its Twitter account.
It said Prime Minister Sheikh Jaber Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah directed military and security officers to tighten security at vital installations in the OPEC producer and to take all necessary measures “to protect Kuwait’s security.”
Some Iraqi media outlets have said Saturday’s attack on Saudi oil facilities came from Iraq, which borders Kuwait. But Baghdad denied this on Sunday and vowed to punish anyone using Iraq as a launch pad for attacks in the region. 
Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdel Mahdi on Sunday denied reports Iraqi territory “was used for drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities.”
“Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors,” he said in a statement.
“The Iraqi government will be extremely firm with whomever tries to violate the constitution.”
Iraq is home to several Iran-backed militias and paramilitary factions, placing it in an awkward situation amid rising tensions between its two main sponsors, Tehran and Washington.
United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo squarely accused Tehran of being behind Saturday’s operation, saying there was no evidence the “unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply” was launched from Yemen.
Iraq has called for its territory to be spared any spillover in the standoff between the US and Iran, which has included a series of attacks on shipping in sensitive Gulf waters.
Recent raids on bases belonging to Iraqi Shiite paramilitary groups linked with Iran, attributed to Israel, sparked fears of an escalation.
There have been no military consequences so far, but the strikes have heightened divisions between pro-Tehran and pro-Washington factions in Iraq’s political class.
Baghdad has recently moved to repair ties with Saudi Arabia, a key US ally — much to Iran’s chagrin.
Riyadh recently announced a major border post on the Iraqi frontier would reopen mid-October, after being closed for almost three decades.