Davos attendees experience flavors of Saudi Arabian cuisine and culture

The MiSK Global Forum (MGF) — the worldwide platform of the MiSK Foundation founded by Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman — hosted a Saudi-themed lunch at the World Economic Forum (WEF) on Friday. (AN Photo)
Updated 27 January 2018

Davos attendees experience flavors of Saudi Arabian cuisine and culture

DAVOS: Davos delegates on the snowy slopes of the Swiss Alps got a taster of sunnier climes Friday, as guests were treated to a Saudi-themed lunch and cultural event.
Those attending the World Economic Forum witnessed an enchanting “Saudi Voyage” as they sampled food from every corner of the Kingdom, including dates, coffee and rice. 
 

Guests at the event also got to experience culture from Saudi Arabia’s five regions through music, art and dance.
Three renowned Saudi Arabian chefs — Ali Al-Yousef, Duha Abdullah and Rakan Al-Areefi — created the diverse menus, while Saudi musicians Abdullah Al-Garni and Saud Al-Shareef entertained the guests.
 

Artwork by modern Saudi artists was on display, giving an insight into the history of 20th century art in the Kingdom and shedding light on the foundations of the contemporary art movement that is growing in the country today.
A guest at the function, South African social entrepreneur Lavuyo Rani, said: “For me, it’s an experience — especially the food — it’s the first time I’ve experienced it, but I’m really enjoying it.”

The event was organized by the MiSK Global Forum (MGF) — the worldwide platform of the MiSK Foundation founded by Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.​

Concept artist Florian de Gesincourt watched several WEF sessions and used the content as inspiration to produce artwork displayed on screens in the main entrance foyer of the WEF Congress Center as well as at the Steigenberger Grandhotel Belvédère in the town. The artwork can be seen on MGF’s social media channels.


Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Photo/Shutterstock
Updated 19 October 2020

Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

  • According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage

JEDDAH: Splashes of pink are appearing in Saudi Arabia’s public spaces to raise awareness about the importance of breast cancer screening.
A number of campaigns are underway this month to support this outreach — in malls, on the street and on billboards.
Pamphlets are being handed out, videos and interactive pictures are on display, there are fundraising activities such as hiking and biking, and medical students have been talking to shoppers and passers-by as part of efforts to increase people’s knowledge.
In Jeddah there was a Tai Chi class on the city’s waterfront, headed by Amatallah Bahaziq, that was attended by female members of Bliss Runners and Bolts. Another event was a bike ride organized by Jeddah Cyclists that included men and women.
A number of major cities across the Kingdom have also seen pop-up campaigns, with specialists ready to answer questions and play a proactive role in spreading proper knowledge and information about the disease, its detection and the chances of survival when detected early.

HIGHLIGHT

According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.

The Zahra Breast Cancer Association is one of Saudi Arabia’s leading organizations dedicated to raising awareness about the disease. It has been supporting cancer patients and survivors and normalizing conversations about breast cancer among the community, with a renewed emphasis during October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
“Given the circumstances (due to the pandemic) we focused our efforts to raise awareness to the importance of early detection virtually,” a representative from the association told Arab News. “With billboards and visuals spread across Saudi cities, we’re still following through with our campaign promise to raise awareness each year and send the message across: Early detection will save your life.”
According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.