Einstein letter fetches $100,000 at Jerusalem auction

1 / 6
A photo taken on March 6, 2018 in Jerusalem shows Winner's auction house owner and manager Gal Wiener holding up before a magnifying glass a letter written by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein to Italian chemist Elisabetta Piccini, dated 1921, prior to its auctioning later in the night with the rest of a series of nine. (AFP)
2 / 6
An employee uses a magnifying glass to inspect a series of letters by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein at Winner's auction house in Jerusalem, on March 6, 2018 prior to being auctioned later in the night with the rest of a series of nine. (AFP)
3 / 6
A photo taken on March 6, 2018 in Jerusalem shows Winner's auction house owner and manager Gal Wiener holding up a signed letter by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein dated 1928 concerning the formalisation of the "Third Stage of the Theory of Relativity", prior to being auctioned later in the night with the rest of a series of nine. (AFP)
4 / 6
A photo taken on March 6, 2018 in Jerusalem shows Winner's auction house owner and manager Gal Wiener holding up a signed letter by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein dated 1928 concerning the formalisation of the "Third Stage of the Theory of Relativity", prior to being auctioned later in the night with the rest of a series of nine. (AFP)
5 / 6
An ultra Orthodox Jewish man, center, bids during an auction in Jerusalem, on March 6, 2018 for a handwritten note by Nobel-winning scientist Albert Einstein. (AP)
6 / 6
A letter written by Albert Einstein in 1928, in which according to the auction house he outlined ideas for his "Third Stage of the Theory of Relativity", is seen before it is sold at an auction in Jerusalem, March 6, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 07 March 2018

Einstein letter fetches $100,000 at Jerusalem auction

JERUSALEM: A letter penned by legendary physicist Albert Einstein discussing one of his groundbreaking theories sold in Jerusalem Tuesday for over $100,000 as part of trove of documents that went under the hammer.
The handwritten missive, sent in 1928 by Einstein from Berlin to a mathematician about the formalization of the “Third Stage of the Theory of Relativity,” was snapped up by an anonymous buyer for $103,700 (83,600 euros).
The letter was written during one of the “most exciting, feverish periods of Einstein’s scientific career” as he worked to hammer out one of the major scientific breakthroughs of the last century, auction house Winner’s said.
It included a second note jotted by Einstein on the back of the envelope refining his thinking.
The sum — while large — pales in comparison to the $1.56 million that one purchaser paid for a letter from Einstein on the secret of happiness at a Jerusalem auction in October after it was initially valued at some $8,000.
Among Tuesday’s other lots were letters and photographs relating to the winner of the 1921 Nobel Prize in physics that also sold for several thousand dollars.
Winner’s boss Gal Wiener told AFP that the trove “reveals the complex character of the great scientist.”
German-born Einstein served as a non-resident governor of Jerusalem’s Hebrew University up to his death.


Mo Salah’s doppelganger substitutes him in some ads

Updated 13 October 2019

Mo Salah’s doppelganger substitutes him in some ads

  • Ahmad Bahaa is an engineer
  • He appeared in Eyptian Vodafone and Pepsi ads

DUBAI: Ahmad Bahaa’s image went viral last year on social media, for one simple reason: he is the look-a-like of internationally famous football player Mo Salah.

Bahaa lives in Egypt and works as an engineer, but he has also substituted Salah in some advertisements, Dubai daily Gulf News reported on Sunday.

“I do some of Mo’s shots for his advertisements when he is busy with the English Premier League,” Bahaa said I an interview with an Egyptian TV channel.

He appeared instead of Salah in the Vodafone and Pepsi ads, in the parts which are shot in Egypt.

A video shows Salah’s reaction after he met Bahaa, as the footballer himself was surprised by the resemblance.