Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump

Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump
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President Donald Trump says Saudi Arabia has been a great friend to the United States and is a "great purchaser" and "investor" in its economy. (AFP)
Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump
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Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump
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Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump
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Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump
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Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman meeting Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell and Speaker of the House of Representatives Paul Ryan, Mar 20, 2018. (AP)
Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump
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Updated 21 March 2018

Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump

Saudi crown prince praises ‘deep relations’ with US as he meets Donald Trump

WASHINGTON: A new “renaissance” was apparent in the artfully decorated Oval Office on Tuesday — as Saudi-US ties reached new heights after the tumultuous years of the Obama administration. 
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, embarking on a lengthy multi-city tour of the US, was greeted at the White House with a warm handshake by President Donald Trump, who said the relationship between the two states is now as good as it has “ever been.”
The meeting, attended by a small but raucous press corps, reinforced the reset in the countries’ relations following tensions under the previous US administration — and shows they are edging closer in trade, defense, and security ties, analysts said last night. 
“We are the oldest ally (of the) United States of America in the Middle East — more than 80 years,” the crown prince said during the meeting at the White House, welcoming the “deep relations” between the two countries.
Speaking in English, Crown Prince Mohammed pointed out significant Saudi investments in the US.
The meeting between Trump and the crown prince came on the same day that the US Senate voted to kill a resolution calling for an end to the US involvement in the conflict in Yemen. The resolution, drafted by senators including Bernie Sanders, was defeated by a 55-44 margin.
President Donald Trump said Saudi Arabia and the US have a “great relationship” and that the Kingdom is assisting in the fight against terror financing.
“We have a zero tolerance for the funding of terrorists. And we’re working very hard, and I will say that Saudi Arabia has been working very hard on that,” he said.
He said the relationship between the nations was “very very strained” during former President Barack Obama’s tenure, but that he and the crown prince have become “very good friends in a short period of time.”
“The relationship now is probably as good as it has really ever been, and I think will probably only get better,” he said.

Talks were also expected to extend to cover Iran, which Saudi Arabia accuses of financing terrorism and meddling in regional countries’ affairs. The Kingdom’s Foreign Minister Adel Al-Jubeir on Monday called the nuclear deal between Iran and Western powers a “flawed agreement,” and Trump has made clear he plans to exit the agreement unless changes are made to it.
“Iran has not been treating that part of the world, or the world itself, appropriately. A lot of bad things are happening in Iran. The deal is coming up in one month and you will see what happens,” Trump said on Tuesday. 
Sigurd Neubauer, a Middle East analyst in Washington, said that the meeting between Trump and the crown prince shows that ties between the countries are stronger.
“There is no doubt that the US-Saudi relationship is having a renaissance,” he said, adding that the two men have an “extraordinary” personal relationship.
“They probably see each other as mirror images. Trump wants to make America great again ... and Mohammed bin Salman wants to make Saudi Arabia great again,” said Neubauer.
It also emerged this week that Saudi Arabia, the UAE and US are launching a trilateral security forum to address Iran’s “malign activity” in the Middle East and other strategic issues.
The forum, to be held at the national security adviser level, will engage monthly on issues of strategic importance, including the US’ South Asia strategy, the unity of the Gulf Cooperation Council and the war in Yemen, according to a US senior administration official.
Firas Maksad, director of the Arabia Foundation in Washington, said that the news showed that the US is looking to build closer ties with its allies in the Arabian Gulf.
“At a time of great change, both in Washington and in the Middle East, the announced trilateral security group signals US determination to coordinate more effectively with its closest Arab allies,” he told Arab News.
Crown Prince Mohammed also met today with Republican and Democratic congressional leaders including Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, according to the Saudi Embassy in Washington.
He also met with Senate majority and minority leaders, the house majority leader, the Senate majority whip, members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, the chair of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, and the chair of the House Committee on Homeland Security. 
The crown prince briefed the members on the Kingdom’s plans for economic transformation through Vision 2030, including recent reforms to empower women and youth in Saudi society.


Bishop calls for adequate burial space for Muslims in Italy

Bishop calls for adequate burial space for Muslims in Italy
Updated 2 min 2 sec ago

Bishop calls for adequate burial space for Muslims in Italy

Bishop calls for adequate burial space for Muslims in Italy
  • Only 58 of country’s 8,000 municipalities have dedicated spaces for Muslims in cemeteries
  • Demand for burial space has increased dramatically due to coronavirus pandemic

ROME: The Catholic bishop of the city of Padua has called for Muslims in Italy to be given adequate burial space in cemeteries.

In a Ramadan message, Bishop Claudio Cipolla expressed his “deep sense of closeness” to the Muslim community, which is “living this important period of the spiritual year amid the hardship of the pandemic.”

He added: “Fraternally, I mourn the Muslim brothers and sisters who died this year. I am aware of the difficulties experienced by the community in finding adequate burial space in the cemeteries of our cities. I believe that concrete integration of people in Italy also comes through the experience of death.”

Only 58 of Italy’s 8,000 municipalities have dedicated spaces for Muslims in their cemeteries. Even when space is available, it is limited and often fails to meet demand, which increased dramatically in 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic.

As national and international travel was banned for months, the bodies of Muslims who died in Italy could not be transported back to where the deceased came from.

Cipolla praised the solidarity offered by Muslim communities during the pandemic, “concrete gestures that were made for those who live in hardship during the pandemic, no matter what religion they profess.”

He added that “prayer, fasting and almsgiving are a powerful antidote against selfishness,” and wished for Muslims to conclude Ramadan “with joy, in the possibility of being together in their prayer rooms.”

Bologna Archbishop Matteo Zuppi also conveyed a Ramadan message of brotherhood to Muslims in Italy.

“This pandemic we are all suffering from must increase the bonds of communion between us. We are really in the same boat,” he said.

“We all feel smaller and more fragile, and therefore we all are in need of support to encourage each other to carry on, in the light of love and solidarity.”


Italy arrests Turkish human trafficker

Italy arrests Turkish human trafficker
Updated 14 April 2021

Italy arrests Turkish human trafficker

Italy arrests Turkish human trafficker
  • Greek court had sentenced man, 33, to 25 years jail over illegal immigration operations
  • Border police caught wanted suspect as he was boarding direct flight to Turkey

ROME: Italian border police have arrested a 33-year-old Turkish citizen wanted in Europe after being sentenced by a Greek court to 25 years in prison for human trafficking.

The man, who has not been named by police, was caught at Orio al Serio airport in the northern Italian province of Bergamo as he was about to board a direct flight to Turkey.

He is charged with human trafficking and facilitating the illegal entrance of migrants.

Greek judicial authorities had issued a European arrest warrant for the man after he was convicted and sentenced for human trafficking between Turkey and Greece in 2014. He is now being held in a Bergamo jail.

He had previously been arrested in Italy in 2015 after a court in the Calabrian city of Crotone accused him of being involved in aiding clandestine and irregular immigration to Italy.

On that occasion, he had been stopped in Italian territorial waters on a 30-meter twin-mast sailing boat flying a US flag with 124 foreigners of various nationalities onboard, including many women and unaccompanied children, who said they had departed from Turkey five days earlier.

The boat had been towing a rubber dinghy which authorities said would have been used by the traffickers to transfer the migrants to land.


NATO forces will leave together from Afghanistan, Blinken says

NATO forces will leave together from Afghanistan, Blinken says
Updated 14 April 2021

NATO forces will leave together from Afghanistan, Blinken says

NATO forces will leave together from Afghanistan, Blinken says
  • NATO foreign and defense ministers will discuss their plans later on Wednesday via video conference

BRUSSELS: US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said on Wednesday that it was time for NATO allies to withdraw from Afghanistan and that the alliance would work on an adaptation phase, after Washington announced plans to end America’s longest war after two decades.
“I am here to work closely with our allies, with the (NATO) secretary-general, on the principle that we have established from the start: In together, adapt together and out together,” Blinken said in a televised statement at NATO headquarters.
NATO foreign and defense ministers will discuss their plans later on Wednesday via video conference.


Russia seeking to ‘provoke’ in Ukraine conflict: Germany

Russia seeking to ‘provoke’ in Ukraine conflict: Germany
Updated 14 April 2021

Russia seeking to ‘provoke’ in Ukraine conflict: Germany

Russia seeking to ‘provoke’ in Ukraine conflict: Germany
  • The growing Russian presence at the Ukrainian border has caused concern in the West in recent days

BERLIN: Germany on Wednesday accused Russia of seeking provocation with its troop build-up along the border with Ukraine.
“My impression is that the Russian side is trying everything to provoke a reaction,” German Defense Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer told ARD public television.
“Together with Ukraine, we won’t be drawn into this game,” she added.
The growing Russian presence at the Ukrainian border has caused concern in the West in recent days, with the United States saying that troop levels are at their highest since 2014, when war first broke out with Moscow-backed separatists.
Moscow has said it sent troops to its western borders for combat drills because of “threats” from transatlantic alliance NATO.
But Kramp-Karrenbauer voiced doubt at Moscow’s claim.
“If it is a maneuver like the Russian side says, there are international procedures through which one can create transparency and trust,” she said, adding that Germany was monitoring developments very closely.
Ukraine has so far reacted in a “sober” manner, said the minister, stressing that NATO stands by Kiev’s side.
“We are committed to Ukraine, that is very clear,” she said.
At the same time, she said, it is also clear that Moscow “is just waiting for a move, so to speak, from NATO, to have a pretext to continue its actions.”


Somali president signs law extending mandate for two years

Somali president signs law extending mandate for two years
Updated 14 April 2021

Somali president signs law extending mandate for two years

Somali president signs law extending mandate for two years
  • Somalia’s lower house of parliament on Monday voted to extend the president’s mandate — which expired in February
  • The new law paves the way for a one-person, one-vote election in 2023

MOGADISHU: Somalia’s President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed has signed a controversial law extending his mandate for another two years, despite threats of sanctions from the international community.
State broadcaster Radio Mogadishu said the president, better known by his nickname Farmajo, had “signed into law the special resolution guiding the elections of the country after it was unanimously passed by parliament.”
Somalia’s lower house of parliament on Monday voted to extend the president’s mandate — which expired in February — after months of deadlock over the holding of elections in the fragile nation.
However the speaker of the Senate slammed the move as unconstitutional, and the resolution was not put before the upper house, which would normally be required, before being signed into law.
Speaker Abdi Hashi Abdullahi said it would “lead the country into political instability, risks of insecurity and other unpredictable situations.”
Farmajo and the leaders of Somalia’s five semi-autonomous federal states had reached an agreement in September that paved the way for indirect parliamentary and presidential elections in late 2020 and early 2021.
But it fell apart as squabbles erupted over how to conduct the vote, and multiple rounds of talks have failed to break the impasse.
The new law paves the way for a one-person, one-vote election in 2023 — the first such direct poll since 1969 — which Somalis have been promised for years and no government has managed to deliver.
A presidential election was due to have been held in February. It was to follow a complex indirect system used in the past in which special delegates chosen by Somalia’s myriad clan elders pick lawmakers, who in turn choose the president.

The international community has repeatedly called for elections to go ahead.
The United States, which has been Somalia’s main ally in recovering from decades of civil war and fighting Al-Qaeda-linked Islamists, said Tuesday it was “deeply disappointed” in the move to extend Farmajo’s mandate.
“Such actions would be deeply divisive, undermine the federalism process and political reforms that have been at the heart of the country’s progress and partnership with the international community, and divert attention away from countering Al-Shabab,” US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken said in a statement.
He said the implementation of the bill would compel the US to “re-evaluate our bilateral relations... and to consider all available tools, including sanctions and visa restrictions, to respond to efforts to undermine peace and stability.”
The European Union’s foreign policy chief Josep Borrell also threatened “concrete measures” if there was not an immediate return to talks on the holding of elections.
A coalition of opposition presidential candidates said in a joint statement that the decision was “a threat to the stability, peace and unity” of the country.
In February some opposition leaders attempted to hold a protest march, which led to an exchange of gunfire in the capital.
Somalia has not had an effective central government since the collapse of Siad Barre’s military regime in 1991, which led to decades of civil war and lawlessness fueled by clan conflicts.
The country also still battles the Al-Qaeda-linked Al-Shabab Islamist militant group which controlled the capital until 2011 when it was pushed out by African Union troops.
Al-Shabab retains parts of the countryside and carries out attacks against government, military and civilian targets in Mogadishu and regional towns.
Somalia still operates under an interim constitution and its institutions, such as the army, remain rudimentary, backed up with international support.
The 59-year-old Farmajo — whose nickname means cheese — was wildly popular when he came to power in 2017.
The veteran diplomat and former prime minister who lived off and on for years in the United States had vowed to rebuild a country that was once the world’s most notorious failed state, and fight corruption.
However observers say he became mired in feuds with federal states in a bid for greater political control, hampering the fight against Al-Shabab, which retains the ability to conduct deadly strikes both at home and in the region.