After Philippines work ban, Kuwait turns to Ethiopia for help

Kuwait announced it is seeking to recruit domestic workers from Ethiopia to cover for the workforce shortfall following the ban the Philippines placed on its citizens on working in the country. (Reuters)
Updated 16 April 2018

After Philippines work ban, Kuwait turns to Ethiopia for help

Kuwait announced it is seeking to recruit domestic workers from Ethiopia to cover for the workforce shortfall following the ban the Philippines placed on its citizens on working in the country, Kuwait Times reported.

The ban followed the murder of a Joanna Demafelis, 29, whose body was discovered in a freezer earlier this year, bearing signs of torture.

Her employers, a Lebanese man and Syrian woman, were sentenced to death last week.

Meanwhile, the Ethiopian ambassador to Kuwait told the newspaper that his government was committed to resending domestic workers to Kuwait, but only once a labor agreement was signed.

Ethiopia wants to ensure that the workers’ rights will be protected while working in Kuwait, Ambassador Abdulaziz Ahmed Adem said.

“Last week we sent the draft copy of the new agreement to the ministry of foreign affairs to be signed by both countries. Once approved, the deployment of workers will resume soon,” he added.

The deal states that the salary of workers should not be less than $400 per month, Ethiopian domestic workers must work no more than 10 hours daily, passports of the workers should be handed to the embassy or preferably retained by the employees and salaries must be deposited in the bank at the end of the month.

Last year, a woman filmed her Ethiopian maid falling from the seventh floor without attempting to save her. Kuwaiti police detained her after the video went viral across the Middle East.


UAE airports screen passengers from China amid coronavirus outbreak

Updated 9 min 28 sec ago

UAE airports screen passengers from China amid coronavirus outbreak

  • Abu Dhabi and Dubai airports confirmed thermal screening had begun for people on direct flight from China
  • The death toll from the coronavirus has risen to 56 on Sunday morning, with the number of infected people also rising to almost 2000

DUBAI: Major airports in the UAE started screening passengers arriving from China over the weekend, as countries continued to step up precautions against the spread of the viral outbreak.

Abu Dhabi and Dubai airports confirmed thermal screening had begun following directives from the UAE’s Civil Aviation Authority and the Ministry of Health.

“All passengers arriving on direct flights from the People’s Republic of China must receive thermal screening at the gate upon arrival and be provided with informational leaflets,” the Dubai Airports said in a statement.

The check-ups will be held at “secured, closed gates” by airport medical teams and the Dubai Health Authority, according to Dubai Airports, assuring it “will continue to provide medical teams with any and all support that may be required.”

The Abu Dhabi International Airport also released a six-point list of “preventive tips” for people travelling to China.

UAE officials earlier confirmed there were no cases of coronavirus in the country, adding it was “in constant touch with the World Health Organization (WHO) to find out latest updates, recommendations and procedures taken in this matter.”

“The health situation poses no grounds for concern and the ministry is closely following up on the situation to ensure the health and safety of everyone,” said the National Committee for International Health Regulations and the Control of Pandemics in a statement.

The death toll from the coronavirus has risen to 56 on Sunday morning, with the number of infected people also rising to almost 2000, according to Chinese authorities.

The contagion remained centered on the Hubei provincial capital of Wuhan, but more than a dozen other cities in the province have been locked down in fears of further spreading.

The previously unknown virus has caused global concern because of its similarity to the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pathogen, which killed hundreds across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003.