PTM urged to stick with original demands to be successful

PTM urged to stick with original demands to be successful
In this file photo, Manzoor Pashteen, a leader of Pashtun Protection Movement addresses his supporters during a rally in Lahore, Pakistan on April 22, 2018. (AP)
Updated 01 May 2018

PTM urged to stick with original demands to be successful

PTM urged to stick with original demands to be successful
  • Analysts say talking of UN guarantees amounts to asking for intervention; either PTM doesn’t understand or is part of drive to involve international community in Pakistan’s domestic affairs
  • Pashtun nationalist party, Awami National Party, and independent analysts say PTM is unlikely to translate into political force

KARACHI: Declaring the calls from members of the Pashtun Tahafuz Movement (PTM) for the presence of the United Nations in its talks with the government as tantamount to “calls for intervention,” independent analysts have urged leaders of the Pashtun rights movement to stick to their original genuine demands while avoiding slogans against state institutions.

The PTM, which shot to fame after Mehsud Jirga in Karachi for Naqeeb Mehsud, has held several successful public gatherings in Peshawar, Lahore and Swat, where most of the attendees happen to be youth and relatives of the missing persons.

The PTM members, briefing the media about initial discussions held on Wednesday at the residence of tribal elder Al-Hajj Shah Jee Gul, called for the presence of international guarantors, particularly the UN, during the talks.

Sana Ejaz, a member of PTM, reiterated that talks must be held in the presence of “international guarantors.” The UN in particular could be a guarantor, she said, given that Pakistan has signed a number of UN treaties and the global body is also responsible for protecting human rights around the world.

However, such calls are not welcomed by many in Pakistan.

“Talking of UN guarantees amounts to asking for a UN intervention. Either PTM leaders don’t understand what they are talking about or it is part of the old campaign to involve the international community in Pak domestic affairs,” said Imtiaz Gul, senior analyst and author.

The Islamabad-based analyst believes that “Manzoor Pashteen’s inciting rhetoric against the military reflects that he might be used by foreign hands, or internal anti-state elements.

“They should also question Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz, Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam and Mehmood Khan Achakzai for putting FATA reforms -– one of the PTM’s demands -– on hold.”

Our first reaction to this type of activism must not be to call them traitors and push all of them against the walls, said Ahmed Quraishi, a talk show host and analyst. “Remember that the majority of them are rallying around legitimate grievances that can be discussed. Our concern should be focused on those elements that want to hijack those demands for anti-state objectives,” Quraishi said.

After the Swat rally held on Sunday, the next destination of the PTM is Karachi, where it has planned to hold a public gathering on May 12, a day when dozens of people, mostly from the Pashtun ethnic community, were murdered to stop them from receiving the then deposed Chief Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, back in 2007.

Awami National Party (ANP), the Pashtun nationalist party, observes the May 12 event every year. The party is trying to persuade the PTM to hold its gathering on another day but if the Manzoor Pashteen-led group insist, the ANP will postpone.

Younus Bunairi, the ANP Sindh general secretary, admitted his party will give the PTM a space on May 12 on its insistence due to its popularity among Pashtun youth but he doubts if the group will ever become a true political force.

“The demands of PTM are genuine and need to be resolved. We endorse their basic demands but it should not go to another extreme level,” Bunairi told Arab News. “Most of the political parties, including the PTI, which were part of the Karachi Mehsud Jirga, have distanced themselves.” 

Bunairi says since the security establishment has agreed to fulfill most of the demands, this will halt the growth of PTM. “The group is comprised of enthusiastic youths. Hardly any mature person has joined it,” he said, adding the group and its growing demands will lose their charm.

Zia Ur Rehman, a Karachi-based journalist who covers social movements, said that though the PTM has successfully been able to spread its message through public rallies and the social media, the sustainability and future of the campaign is questionable.

“At this stage, the PTM has been attracting educated youth and ordinary people who have been affected by the military operations in the country’s tribal areas, but to sustain the movement for longer, it is imperative that its leaders organize the group and bring serious leadership to the decision-making body, refrain from using provocative language against state institutions and stick to their five key demands,” he said.

Elections are very different from social campaigns and it would be hard for the PTM to gain significant results on the electoral front, the Karachi-based analyst said. 

“In Pakistan, elections need wealth, tribal strength and plant-level structure of a political party, and the PTM draws its support mainly from middle-class youth and the poor strata of society,” Rehman said. Also, he added, most of the PTM supporters are from two Pashtun ethnic parties -– Awami National Party and the Pakhtunkhwa Milli Awami Party — and on the electoral front, they are likely to support their own political parties.

FASTFACTS


Wife of Briton detained in Iran urges PM to secure his release

A British-Iranian dual citizen being held prisoner in Iran has lost access to a phone, depriving him of his lifeline to sanity and the outside world, according to his wife. (AFP/File Photo)
A British-Iranian dual citizen being held prisoner in Iran has lost access to a phone, depriving him of his lifeline to sanity and the outside world, according to his wife. (AFP/File Photo)
Updated 02 August 2021

Wife of Briton detained in Iran urges PM to secure his release

A British-Iranian dual citizen being held prisoner in Iran has lost access to a phone, depriving him of his lifeline to sanity and the outside world, according to his wife. (AFP/File Photo)
  • Family: Anoosheh Ashoori, 67, has been in ‘hell’ since his detention 4 years ago
  • ‘It has been more than a year since our family requested a meeting with the prime minister. He is apparently unable to meet us’

LONDON: The wife of a British citizen held in an Iranian jail for four years has pleaded with UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson to show he “genuinely cares” by securing his release.

Anoosheh Ashoori, 67, has been in “hell,” his family said, since he was arrested on a visit to Iran and later convicted of spying for Israel — charges he denies.

He is now four years into a 10-year sentence in Tehran’s notorious Evin prison, which is often used for detained dual nationals.

During his time in jail, there have been serious concerns about Ashoori’s health, particularly as COVID-19 ravaged Iran’s prison system.

In a letter to The Times, his wife Sherry Izadi insisted that the charges against him are entirely fabricated, and accused Johnson of avoiding a request for a meeting to discuss the case.

“Boris Johnson says that the plight of Anoosheh ... ‘remains a top priority.’ Yet actions speak louder than words,” Izadi wrote.

“It has been more than a year since our family requested a meeting with the prime minister. He is apparently unable to meet us.”

Johnson did meet with Richard Ratcliffe, husband of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, last year. She remains in detention in Iran, and is currently on bail and living in her parents’ Tehran home while she awaits news of her fate.

Last month, an Iranian newspaper suggested that Ashoori and Zaghari-Ratcliffe were being considered for a prisoner swap along with American detainees, but this was publicly denied by the US.

The British Foreign Office said it has raised Ashoori’s case with Tehran. A spokesperson said: “Iran’s continued arbitrary detention of our dual nationals is unacceptable and is a stain on Iran’s international reputation. We urge the Iranian authorities to do the right thing and release the detainees.”

Tehran faces regular criticism for its treatment of foreign nationals, particularly those with dual Iranian citizenship.

“Having citizens with deep connections to other cultures and countries is an asset, not a criminal offense,” said Human Rights Watch.

“But Iran’s security apparatus has apparently made the despicable decision to use these individuals as bargaining chips to resolve diplomatic disputes.”


US, UK embassies in Afghanistan accuse Taliban of possible war crimes

US, UK embassies in Afghanistan accuse Taliban of possible war crimes
Updated 02 August 2021

US, UK embassies in Afghanistan accuse Taliban of possible war crimes

US, UK embassies in Afghanistan accuse Taliban of possible war crimes
  • Suhail Shaheen, a Taliban negotiating team member based in Doha, told Reuters that tweets containing the accusations were "baseless reports"
  • U.S. Embassy in Kabul tweeted accusing the Taliban of killing dozens of civilians in Kandahar province

KABUL: The US and British embassies in Kabul said on Monday the insurgent Taliban may have committed war crimes in southern Afghanistan by carrying out revenge murders of civilians, a charge denied by the insurgents.
Suhail Shaheen, a Taliban negotiating team member based in Doha, told Reuters that tweets containing the accusations were “baseless reports.”
The US Embassy in the capital Kabul tweeted a statement accusing the Taliban of killing dozens of civilians in the area of Spin Boldak in southern Kandahar province. The statement was also tweeted by the British embassy.
“These murders could constitute war crimes; they must be investigated & those Taliban fighters or commanders responsible held accountable,” the US Embassy tweeted.
In a second tweet, it said: “The Taliban’s leadership must be held responsible for the crimes of their fighters. If you cannot control your fighters now, you have no business in governance later.”
The tweets, accompanied by calls for a cease-fire, stepped up the United States’ public criticism of the group as US troops withdraw and the Taliban goes on the offensive.
US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said last week that Afghanistan would become a ‘pariah state’ if any future Taliban rule in Afghanistan resulted in atrocities against civilians.
The insurgents gained control last month of the strategic area of Spin Boldak, which lies at a border and trade crossing with Pakistan, and heavy fighting has taken place since as Afghan forces try to recapture the area.


Scotland health secretary reports nursery for discrimination over Muslim name

Scotland’s Health Secretary Humza Yousaf has alleged that a local nursery discriminated against his 2-year-old daughter. (Screenshot/File Photo)
Scotland’s Health Secretary Humza Yousaf has alleged that a local nursery discriminated against his 2-year-old daughter. (Screenshot/File Photo)
Updated 02 August 2021

Scotland health secretary reports nursery for discrimination over Muslim name

Scotland’s Health Secretary Humza Yousaf has alleged that a local nursery discriminated against his 2-year-old daughter. (Screenshot/File Photo)
  • Newspaper probe revealed pupils with non-Muslim names offered places, children with Muslim names rejected
  • Humza Yousaf: ‘We are fooling ourselves if we believe discrimination doesn’t exist in Scotland’ 

LONDON: Scotland’s Health Secretary Humza Yousaf has alleged that a local nursery denied his daughter, 2, a place “because of her Muslim name.”

He is taking his case to the care authorities for review after finding out that the Little Scholars Nursery in Dundee, Scotland, was willing to offer a place to a white friend’s child having denied his own daughter Amal a place.

Yousaf said he and his wife Nadia El-Nakla had contacted the nursery in May asking if they had places available.

They said they were told that there were “no available spaces in the nursery” — the second time the couple said they had been turned down.

But when they asked a white Scottish friend to contact the same place, the nursery responded and offered them places for three afternoons a week. The responses came less than 24 hours apart, said Yousaf.

He said when he became suspicious of the nursery he asked a local paper, the Daily Record, to investigate.

Its journalists created two applications for children of the same age and with the same requirements — one with a Muslim name, the other with a white Scottish name.

The child named Aqsa Akhtar was rejected, the Daily Record reported, while Susan Blake was offered a choice of four afternoons. 

“I cannot tell you how angry I am,” Yousaf tweeted. “As a father all I want to do is protect my girls, yet aged 2 I believe my daughter has faced discrimination. If this had not happened to me I’m not sure I would have believed it could happen in 2021. How many other families has this happened to?”

In a separate post, he added: “We are fooling ourselves if we believe discrimination doesn’t exist in Scotland.”

In a statement, Little Scholars Nursery said any claim that it is not open and inclusive to all is “demonstrably false.”

It added: “We note Mr Yousaf’s call for a Care Inspectorate investigation and this is something we would absolutely welcome. We have nothing to hide and look forward to the opportunity to demonstrate the policies and procedures we have in place to ensure we are a nursery that is open and welcoming to all.”

The Care Inspectorate, responsible for overseeing the fair and high-quality administration of care in Scotland, said “a concern has been raised” and it is considering the information received.


We need to get the travel industry moving again, UK PM Johnson says

We need to get the travel industry moving again, UK PM Johnson says
Updated 02 August 2021

We need to get the travel industry moving again, UK PM Johnson says

We need to get the travel industry moving again, UK PM Johnson says
  • "We need to get people, get the travel industry moving again," Johnson told reporters
  • Johnson's travel regulations have angered some of Britain's European allies, frustrated millions of sun-seeking Britons

LONDON: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Monday that he wanted to get the travel industry moving again with a simple user-friendly system to allow for trips abroad without importing new variants of the coronavirus.
“We need to get people, get the travel industry moving again,” Johnson told reporters. “We want an approach that is as simple as we can possibly make it.”
Britain has double vaccinated a higher proportion of its population against COVID-19 than most other countries, but the government has prevented travel to many destinations by imposing rules that the travel industry says are hobbling the economy.
Johnson’s travel regulations have angered some of Britain’s European allies, frustrated millions of sun-seeking Britons and brought warnings from airports, airlines and tour companies.
In a letter to Johnson that was leaked to media, finance minister Rishi Sunak called for an urgent easing of travel restrictions.
The Times newspaper reported that Britain planned to warn holidaymakers against visiting popular tourist destinations such as Spain because of concerns about the COVID-19 pandemic.
Such a step could trigger an exodus of about a million British tourists already abroad, cause further damage to the travel sector and deal a new blow to southern Europe’s summer tourist season.
A spokesperson for Britain’s transport ministry declined to comment on The Times report, published on the day when rules were eased for double-vaccinated travelers from the United States and most of Europe.
Under rules to be reviewed on Thursday, double-vaccinated travelers can return without quarantining from countries rated “amber” on a “traffic-light” list assessing the COVID-19 risk.
Those returning from red-list countries — the most severe risk — must pay 1,750 pounds ($2,436) to spend 10 days in a hotel.
An amber watchlist was due to be signed off on Thursday but a split in the government could delay a decision, The Times said.
Citing the threat posed by the Beta coronavirus variant, England has maintained quarantine rules for double-vaccinated travelers from France, while scrapping the requirement for travelers from other medium-risk “amber” countries.
France has complained, saying the bulk of its Beta variant cases come from the island of La Reunion in the Indian Ocean.


Family of London terrorist claim his death was needless

The family of terrorist Sudesh Amman, who was shot dead by police after conducting a knifing rampage in London, are expected to question whether his life could have been saved. (AP/File Photo)
The family of terrorist Sudesh Amman, who was shot dead by police after conducting a knifing rampage in London, are expected to question whether his life could have been saved. (AP/File Photo)
Updated 02 August 2021

Family of London terrorist claim his death was needless

The family of terrorist Sudesh Amman, who was shot dead by police after conducting a knifing rampage in London, are expected to question whether his life could have been saved. (AP/File Photo)
  • Sudesh Amman shot dead after stabbing 2 people
  • Family say he could have been arrested before attack

LONDON: The family of a terrorist who was shot dead by police after conducting a knifing rampage in London are expected to question whether his life could have been saved by being arrested earlier.

It will be the first time relatives of an Islamist terrorist in Britain will ask in court if the killing of their relative was necessary.

The inquest into the death of Sudesh Amman, 20, who stabbed two random members of the public on Feb. 2, 2020, is due to open on Monday at the Royal Courts of Justice in London.

Amman was being closely observed by undercover reconnaissance officers when he was seen purchasing items for a fake suicide vest, which he put together in his probation hostel.

The next day, while being followed by officers, he quickly grabbed a knife from a shop and stabbed two passers-by in south London.

Both of his victims survived, but Amman was shot and killed by the armed team that was tracking him a minute after his rampage commenced.

His prison release on Jan. 23 meant that he had spent just 10 days in a probation hostel before he was killed.

At a pre-inquest hearing in July, Amman’s relatives queried if the police and MI5 could have arrested him before he was able to conduct the attack.

MI5, Britain’s domestic security service, has applied for intelligence about Amman to be given public interest immunity, which would limit its use in court or any inquiry.

Rajiv Menon QC, representing the Amman family, argued that immunity should not be given if the material “goes to the state of mind of any relevant police officer or security service agent, as to what Sudesh Amman was planning or contemplating.”

The lawyer said his clients have objected to a statement by a police officer known as HA6, who was the senior investigating officer on the “priority” operation against Amman.

The officer said police “could not effect an arrest,” but Menon argued that they “knew the day before that Amman had bought items that could be used to make a fake suicide vest.”

At the hearing at the High Court, he added: “We will be making the point that the police knew more than enough to effect an arrest and should have done so.”

At the time, investigators and surveillance officers feared an attack by Amman was imminent, keeping him under constant observation.

Jonathan Hough QC, for the coroner, said: “This is not a case of signs being missed. It is difficult to imagine a higher grade response, short of arrest and you will be aware of what HA6 says about why that was not feasible.”

The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) is writing a supplementary report to cover the operation against Amman from January 2020.

The IOPC said on June 17 that during the investigation, “it is not anticipated that any concerns will arise as to the conduct of any police officers.”