Tom Cruise lifts Mission: Impossible — Fallout to a new series best

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The Mission: Impossible – Fallout is eyeing a North American debut between $50 million and $65 million. (Paramount Pictures)
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“Fallout” is by far the most expensive film in the Mission: Impossible series with a $178 million price tag. (Paramount Pictures)
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“Fallout” is by far the most expensive film in the Mission: Impossible series with a $178 million price tag. (Paramount Pictures)
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“Fallout” is by far the most expensive film in the Mission: Impossible series with a $178 million price tag. (Paramount Pictures)
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Tom Cruise, who performs all his own stunts, has described the Abu Dhabi skydive as “one of [my] most dangerous stunts yet.” (Paramount Pictures)
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The Mission: Impossible – Fallout is eyeing a North American debut between $50 million and $65 million. (Paramount Pictures)
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The Mission: Impossible – Fallout is eyeing a North American debut between $50 million and $65 million. (Paramount Pictures)
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“Fallout” is by far the most expensive film in the Mission: Impossible series with a $178 million price tag. (Paramount Pictures)
Updated 26 July 2018

Tom Cruise lifts Mission: Impossible — Fallout to a new series best

  • With the series, Tom Cruise was, as its producer, very consciously launching his own action franchise
  • This series is a set-piece delivery mechanism, and its stories and central character are only there to make those moments happen

Through 22 years and six entries, there is no question as to what the driving force of the Mission: Impossible film franchise is—it’s Tom Cruise. With the series, Cruise was, as its producer, very consciously launching his own action franchise, and each entry since has been guided first and foremost by what stunt he wanted to perform next.
Writers on the second entry in 2000 said that the script was mainly a matter of fitting together the action set pieces that Cruise had already mandated and planned for the film. Now, 18 years later, writer/director Christopher McQuarrie has stated that the latest entry, “Mission: Impossible - Fallout,” featuring a skydiving sequence filmed in Abu Dhabi, began with Cruise saying he would like to pilot a helicopter in a chase.
It’s no wonder that the plots of this series feel so incidental. American poet Maya Angelou once said, “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” I’m near certain that she was talking about this film franchise. What you remember, as the story of each film self-destructs five seconds after you leave the cinema, is the moments—Cruise hanging from the ceiling, Cruise dangling off the Burj Khalifa, Cruise strapped to the side of a plane. This series is a set-piece delivery mechanism, and its stories and central character—the IMF agent Ethan Hunt—are only there to make those moments happen.


What is Fallout about? The previous installment’s terror group is back, they’ve got plutonium, and they plan to set off nuclear bombs. Ethan Hunt must pose as a terrorist and try to get the plutonium before they have the chance. That’s the plot, anyways. What this film is really about is Ethan Hunt, and how he goes about achieving his goals.

In Fallout, the name of the franchise is the key—each task that Hunt must complete starts off seeming difficult, and as it plays out, quickly seems truly impossible. Each sequence sets the stakes and then continues to raise them, giving this film a palpable tension unlike any action film has delivered in recent memory. But even as the odds get longer, and we the audience question how Hunt will manage to succeed, Hunt himself, even through all the punishment he takes, never loses faith—he will, simply, find a way.
This resonates because we believe it, too—not in the character, but in Cruise himself. In a series that has always relied on practical effects, we know, and are told over and over again, that this is really a 56-year-old Tom Cruise up there, risking his life, defying age, doing what no other person on Earth would dream of doing. Cruise is still the world’s best movie star, and best action star, because he decides he can be. It’s a faith that’s truly infectious. As stressful as this film is, it’s also, without a doubt, the year’s most uplifting, and life-affirming.

 

 


Bollywood megastar Bachchan hospitalized with COVID-19

Updated 11 July 2020

Bollywood megastar Bachchan hospitalized with COVID-19

  • Affectionately known as "Big B", Bachchan shot to stardom in the early 1970s on the back of roles in huge hit movies such as "Zanjeer" and "Sholay"
  • Millions of Indians revere Bachchan like royalty, hanging on his every word and seeking his blessings

MUMBAI: Bollywood veteran megastar Amitabh Bachchan, 77, has tested positive for COVID-19 and been admitted to hospital in his hometown of Mumbai, he said Saturday on Twitter, calling for those close to him to get tested.
"I have tested CoviD positive .. shifted to Hospital," Bachchan wrote, saying his family and staff had already been tested and were awaiting their results.
"All that have been in close proximity to me in the last 10 days are requested to please get themselves tested!" he added.

His son Abhishek Bachchan, 44, said in a tweet minutes later that he had also tested positive.

The Bollywood actors were admitted to Nanavati Hospital in Mumbai, India's financial and entertainment hub, and several other members of the high-profile family were tested for the virus.

Affectionately known as "Big B", Bachchan shot to stardom in the early 1970s on the back of roles in huge hit movies such as "Zanjeer" and "Sholay".
His films still open to packed cinemas across India, but his new movie - comedy-drama "Gulabo Sitabo" - was released on Amazon's streaming service due to the coronavirus restrictions.
Bollywood recently resumed film shoots after a months-long hiatus following the imposition of a nationwide lockdown in India in late March.
But actors over the age of 65, such as Bachchan, are banned from set due to their vulnerability to the virus.
India's nationwide coronavirus toll rose Saturday to 820,916 cases - the third highest in the world - with 22,123 deaths.
Health workers have complained about severe staff shortages, with some senior doctors and nurses avoiding frontlines because of their risk of catching the virus.
As the death toll climbs, critics say the country is not testing enough - leaving many infections undiagnosed.
Millions of Indians revere Bachchan like royalty, hanging on his every word, seeking his blessings and congregating outside his Mumbai bungalow every year on October 11, his birthday.
The doyen of Bollywood is a keen user of Twitter, where he has 43 million followers, and his career has branched into television presenting, business and politics, as well as countless commercial endorsements.
Early in his acting life, Bachchan earned his reputation as India's "angry young man" for portraying violent heroes fighting an unjust system and injecting a new aggressive element into Bollywood movies, which had previously consisted of polite romances.
After some lean years, Bachchan bounced back spectacularly, largely due to his stint as host for the Indian version of the popular TV game show "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?", which revived his artistic and financial fortunes.
According to local media, he was being treated at Mumbai's Nanavati hospital.