Tom Cruise lifts Mission: Impossible — Fallout to a new series best

1 / 8
The Mission: Impossible – Fallout is eyeing a North American debut between $50 million and $65 million. (Paramount Pictures)
2 / 8
“Fallout” is by far the most expensive film in the Mission: Impossible series with a $178 million price tag. (Paramount Pictures)
3 / 8
“Fallout” is by far the most expensive film in the Mission: Impossible series with a $178 million price tag. (Paramount Pictures)
4 / 8
“Fallout” is by far the most expensive film in the Mission: Impossible series with a $178 million price tag. (Paramount Pictures)
5 / 8
Tom Cruise, who performs all his own stunts, has described the Abu Dhabi skydive as “one of [my] most dangerous stunts yet.” (Paramount Pictures)
6 / 8
The Mission: Impossible – Fallout is eyeing a North American debut between $50 million and $65 million. (Paramount Pictures)
7 / 8
The Mission: Impossible – Fallout is eyeing a North American debut between $50 million and $65 million. (Paramount Pictures)
8 / 8
“Fallout” is by far the most expensive film in the Mission: Impossible series with a $178 million price tag. (Paramount Pictures)
Updated 26 July 2018

Tom Cruise lifts Mission: Impossible — Fallout to a new series best

  • With the series, Tom Cruise was, as its producer, very consciously launching his own action franchise
  • This series is a set-piece delivery mechanism, and its stories and central character are only there to make those moments happen

Through 22 years and six entries, there is no question as to what the driving force of the Mission: Impossible film franchise is—it’s Tom Cruise. With the series, Cruise was, as its producer, very consciously launching his own action franchise, and each entry since has been guided first and foremost by what stunt he wanted to perform next.
Writers on the second entry in 2000 said that the script was mainly a matter of fitting together the action set pieces that Cruise had already mandated and planned for the film. Now, 18 years later, writer/director Christopher McQuarrie has stated that the latest entry, “Mission: Impossible - Fallout,” featuring a skydiving sequence filmed in Abu Dhabi, began with Cruise saying he would like to pilot a helicopter in a chase.
It’s no wonder that the plots of this series feel so incidental. American poet Maya Angelou once said, “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” I’m near certain that she was talking about this film franchise. What you remember, as the story of each film self-destructs five seconds after you leave the cinema, is the moments—Cruise hanging from the ceiling, Cruise dangling off the Burj Khalifa, Cruise strapped to the side of a plane. This series is a set-piece delivery mechanism, and its stories and central character—the IMF agent Ethan Hunt—are only there to make those moments happen.


What is Fallout about? The previous installment’s terror group is back, they’ve got plutonium, and they plan to set off nuclear bombs. Ethan Hunt must pose as a terrorist and try to get the plutonium before they have the chance. That’s the plot, anyways. What this film is really about is Ethan Hunt, and how he goes about achieving his goals.

In Fallout, the name of the franchise is the key—each task that Hunt must complete starts off seeming difficult, and as it plays out, quickly seems truly impossible. Each sequence sets the stakes and then continues to raise them, giving this film a palpable tension unlike any action film has delivered in recent memory. But even as the odds get longer, and we the audience question how Hunt will manage to succeed, Hunt himself, even through all the punishment he takes, never loses faith—he will, simply, find a way.
This resonates because we believe it, too—not in the character, but in Cruise himself. In a series that has always relied on practical effects, we know, and are told over and over again, that this is really a 56-year-old Tom Cruise up there, risking his life, defying age, doing what no other person on Earth would dream of doing. Cruise is still the world’s best movie star, and best action star, because he decides he can be. It’s a faith that’s truly infectious. As stressful as this film is, it’s also, without a doubt, the year’s most uplifting, and life-affirming.

 

 


Emirati photographer finds that lockdowns have a silver lining

The photographer enjoys capturing industrial facilities and ghostly landscapes. (Tashkeel)
Updated 29 May 2020

Emirati photographer finds that lockdowns have a silver lining

DUBAI: The COVID-19 lockdowns may have cancelled festivals and closed down museums around the world, but some artists have continued to thrive.  

Emirati photographer Jalal Bin Thaneya told Arab News that in his field the pandemic has only slowed down artistic photography.

“Some documentary and news photographers are still able to work, especially those employed by organizations and governments fighting the virus,” Thaneya said. “Documenting and getting images of what is happening on the ground is extremely important.”

“Photography records moments,” the artist said. “In World War II, (the American photographer) Margaret Bourke-White was actively taking pictures and she has been a big influence on me.”

This, he believes, is an example of how photography and art have flourished during difficult times.

Despite the delays the lockdown has imposed on Thaneya’s projects, he says he now has got more time to work on his unpublished pictures. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Rims 02, 120x160 cm, 2018 / #industry #beyondthefence

A post shared by Jalal Bin Thaneya (@binthaneya) on

“Priorities have shifted overnight. I have many images I made that I never showed which I’m currently compiling. The lockdown has given me time to organize myself and prepare for future projects,” he said. 

The self-taught artist, who enjoys capturing industrial facilities and ghostly landscapes, said: “What I do is very niche and not widely appreciated in the region.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Valves / #industry #industrial_landscapes

A post shared by Jalal Bin Thaneya (@binthaneya) on

He discovered his passion by “accident” in 2013. “I saw old architecture being demolished at the Jabal Ali port and it is from that point that I started taking pictures of abandoned spaces before focusing on industrial landscapes and artefacts from 2016 to date.”

Thaneya believes that many people look down on his job. “However, if I listened to what people said, I would’ve stopped many years ago,” he added. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Raw material feeder and cement silos. // #Industry #Industrial_Dubai

A post shared by Jalal Bin Thaneya (@binthaneya) on

“You’ve got to follow your intuition and do things that give you purpose. Listening and following the crowd will only dilute your character and individual essence,” he advised other photographers who wish to pursue this career. 

“We cannot allow others to do the thinking for us, we need to be clear and focused on what we would like to achieve,” Thaneya said.