Muslim World League opens Rohingya relief center in Bangladesh

1 / 2
Dr. Al-Issa presiding over the meeting of leaders of the International Islamic Relief Organization on supporting Rohingya refugees. (SPA)
2 / 2
Dr. Mohammed Al-Issa inaugurating relief, care and development projects for Rohingya refugees. (SPA)
Updated 29 July 2018
0

Muslim World League opens Rohingya relief center in Bangladesh

  • The center will provide a small community for Rohingya refugees with social facilities
  • It will offer basic education, vocational training and primary health care

JEDDAH: Muslim World League Secretary-General Mohammed bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa inaugurated the Integrated Services Center for Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh on Saturday.
Al-Issa stressed the importance of the completion of the center as soon as possible in line with the MWL’s commitment to the best standards according to the conditions available for each environment, as well as the best practices in comprehensive humanitarian action, which represent a qualitative leap in relief work for Rohingya refugees who live in difficult conditions.
He said that the center will provide a small community for Rohingya refugees with social facilities offering basic education, vocational training and primary health care.
Al-Issa praised the efforts of the International Islamic Relief Organization in preparing and planning for the establishment of the Bangladesh center.
In a previous statement, the MWL addressed the international community, noting that the atrocities suffered by the Rohingya in Myanmar from brutal attacks and genocide in full view of the whole world is stain on the face of humanity and its international system.
“This disturbing historical chapter in the humanitarian and international record will be a witness to the magnitude of the failure to stop certain massacres and crimes of hatred,” Al-Issa said.
“These crimes represent one of the worst brutal and bloody terrorist images, which is no less than the terrorism and crimes of terrorist organizations around the world, such as Daesh.”
Al-Issa said that the MWL is focusing on the economic empowerment of refugees to help them be productive and self-sufficient in their own environments, and thus achieve sustainable development — the main aim of the humanitarian work of the MWL.
The secretary-general highlighted the importance of raising the health awareness of the Rohingya by focusing on and addressing the personal needs of women and their psychological and health requirements, in addition to providing personal health requirements for the rest of the family.
At the same time, these efforts should help mitigate the impact of physical and psychological violence suffered by Rohingya refugees, through specialized psychological and reunion programs, the care of orphans, widows, and other specialized programs, he said.
Al-Issa pointed out that the efforts of the MWL support its international presence as a world organization with great weight and influence, by harnessing all the potential to be present wherever required, on a purely humanitarian basis that does not carry any discrimination, based on the teachings of Islam.


North Korea faces lowest crop harvest in 5 years, widespread food shortages -UN

Updated 20 September 2019

North Korea faces lowest crop harvest in 5 years, widespread food shortages -UN

  • South Korea has pledged to provide 50,000 tons of rice aid to its northern neighbor through the UN World Food Programme
  • Sporadic famines are common in North Korea, although a severe nationwide famine in the 1990s killed as many as a million people

SEOUL: North Korea’s crop production this year is expected to drop to its lowest level in five years, bringing serious shortages for 40 percent of the population, as a dry spell and poor irrigation hit an economy already reeling from sanctions over its weapons programs, the United Nations said on Thursday.
In its latest quarterly Crop Prospects and Food Situation report, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said the poor harvest of the country’s main crops, rice and maize, means 10.1 million people are in urgent need of assistance.
“Below-average rains and low irrigation availability between mid-April and mid-July, a critical period for crop development, mainly affected the main season rice and maize crops,” the FAO said. The report, which covers cereal supply and demand around the world and identifies countries that need external food aid, didn’t disclose detailed estimates of production by volume.
North Korea has long struggled with food shortages and a dysfunctional state rationing system, and state media has in recent months warned of drought and other “persisting abnormal phenomena.”
The crops shortfall comes as the country bids to contain the spread of African swine fever in its pig herd, following confirmation of a first case in May.
The disease, fatal to pigs though not harmful to humans, has spread into Asia — including South Korea — since first being detected in China last year, resulting in large-scale culls and reduced production of pork, a staple meat across the region including in North Korea.
The FAO report followed earlier UN assessments this year that the isolated country’s food production last year fell to its lowest level in more than a decade amid a prolonged heatwave, typhoon and floods.
South Korea has pledged to provide 50,000 tons of rice aid to its northern neighbor through the UN World Food Programme (WFP). But its delivery has been delayed by Pyongyang’s lukewarm response amid stalled inter-Korean dialogue and denuclearization talks with the United States, Seoul officials said.
In July, the North’s official KCNA news agency said a campaign to mitigate the effects of drought was under way by digging canals and wells, installing pumps, and using people and vehicles to transport water.
But North Korea has told the United Nations to cut the number of its staff it deploys in the country for aid programs. citing the “politicization of UN assistance by hostile forces.”
Sporadic famines are common in North Korea, but observers said a severe nationwide famine in the 1990s killed as many as a million people.