Indonesia disbands groups linked to Daesh

JAD leader Aman Abdurrahman urged followers to carry out a series of terror attacks, including the 2016 raid in central Jakarta that left eight people, including four extremists, dead. (Reuters)
Updated 31 July 2018

Indonesia disbands groups linked to Daesh

  • JAD leader Aman Abdurrahman was sentenced to death for masterminding a string of deadly attacks from his jail cell
  • The court verdict also included a 5 million rupiah fine for the group

JAKARTA: An Indonesian court declared on Tuesday all groups related to Daesh as defunct and disbanded Jamaah Anshor Daulah (JAD), a local militant group responsible for terror attacks in Indonesia, including the first attack in the country involving women and children in Surabaya in May.

Aris Buwono Langgeng, the presiding judge, told a court hearing at the South Jakarta District Court that JAD as a “corporation” was proven guilty, with convincing evidence that it has carried out terror attacks and incited widespread terror.

“(The court) hereby declares the Jamaah Anshor Daulah or JAD corporation or organization, and other organizations affiliated to Daesh as outlawed corporations,” Langgeng said.

The verdict also included a 5 million rupiah fine for the group.

The verdict makes JAD the second terror-linked group to be disbanded in Indonesia after Jemaah Islamiyah in 2008. The group was affiliated with Al-Qaeda and behind the deadly Bali bombings in 2002.

Zainal Anshori, a JAD leader of its East Java chapter who represented the group, shouted “God is Great” on hearing the verdict and before consulting his lawyer Asludin Hatjani about whether or not to appeal.

“We have consulted our client and he told me to just let it be, there is no use to appeal. It is not about whether he agrees with the verdict or not. He just didn’t specify the reason. So, as JAD’s lawyer, I would not appeal,” Hatjani told journalists after the hearing.

Adhe Bakti, a terrorism analyst, told Arab News that the verdict would pave the way for law enforcement officials to detain people alleged to support groups with links to Daesh.

It also empowers the police to step up a crackdown on alleged militants and to increase security when Indonesia hosts two international events — the Asian Games in August and the IMF-World Bank annual meetings in October.

“The judge took into account previous court rulings on defendants with links to JAD. The panel of judges came to the conclusion that JAD is indeed a corporation with members who have carried out terror attacks, therefore it can be classified as a terrorist group even though it is a loose organization,” Bakti said.

The same court sentenced JAD leader Aman Abdurrahman to death in June for urging followers to carry out a series of terror attacks, including the 2016 raid in central Jakarta that left eight people, including four extremists, dead.

However, during his trial, Abdurrahman denied supporting the suicide bombings carried out by two families on three churches and a police headquarters in Surabaya, Indonesia’s second-biggest city, and said that involving women and children in such attacks was cruel.

The US State Department named JAD as a global terrorist group in January 2017 and described it as “a terrorist group based in Indonesia,” established in 2015 and composed of almost two dozen Indonesian extremist groups that have pledged allegiance to Daesh leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi.

Meanwhile, the Indonesia government is verifying Filipino media reports that an Indonesian national was allegedly involved in a suicide car bomb in Basilan that killed 10 on Tuesday.

Lalu Muhammad Iqbal, the Foreign Ministry’s director for protection of Indonesians abroad, said that the ministry has instructed the consulate general in Davao to obtain official information on the alleged Indonesian national’s involvement in the attack.

“So far local authorities still have not indicated that there is an Indonesian national implicated, whether as a victim or as an alleged suspect,” Iqbal said.


Coronavirus worst crisis since Second World War, UN boss says as deaths surge

Updated 01 April 2020

Coronavirus worst crisis since Second World War, UN boss says as deaths surge

  • Around half of the planet’s population is under some form of lockdown
  • Lockdowns remain at the forefront of official disease-stopping arsenals — a strategy increasingly borne-out by science

WASHINGTON: The global death toll from the coronavirus pandemic continued to worsen Wednesday despite unprecedented lockdowns, as the head of the United Nations sounded the alarm on what he said was humanity’s worst crisis since World War II.
The warning came as Donald Trump told Americans to brace for a “very painful” few weeks after the United States registered its deadliest 24 hours of the crisis.
Around half of the planet’s population is under some form of lockdown as governments struggle to halt the spread of a disease that has now infected more than 850,000 people.
Well over 40,000 are known to have died, half of them in Italy and Spain, but the death toll continues to rise with new records being logged daily in the US.
“This is going to be a very painful — a very, very painful — two weeks,” Trump said, describing the pandemic as “a plague.”
“I want every American to be prepared for the hard days that lie ahead.”
America’s outbreak has mushroomed rapidly. There are now around 190,000 known cases — a figure that has doubled in just five days.
On Tuesday, a record 865 people died, according to a tally kept by Johns Hopkins University, taking the national toll so far to more than 4,000.
Members of Trump’s coronavirus task force said the country should be ready for between 100,000 and 240,000 deaths in the coming months.
“As sobering a number as that is, we should be prepared for it,” Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert.
America’s under-pressure health system is being supplemented by field hospitals sprouting up all over New York, including a tented camp in Central Park, a hospital ship and converted convention centers.
But even with the extended capacity, doctors say they are still having to make painful choices.
“If you get a surge of patients coming in, and you only have a limited number of ventilators, you can’t necessarily ventilate patients,” Shamit Patel of the Beth Israel hospital said. “And then you have to start picking and choosing.”
The extraordinary economic and political upheaval spurred by the virus presents a real danger to the relative peace the world has seen over the last few decades, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said Tuesday.
The “disease ... represents a threat to everybody in the world and... an economic impact that will bring a recession that probably has no parallel in the recent past.”
“The combination of the two facts and the risk that it contributes to enhanced instability, enhanced unrest, and enhanced conflict are things that make us believe that this is the most challenging crisis we have faced since the Second World War,” he said.
In virtual talks Tuesday, finance ministers and central bankers from the world’s 20 major economies pledged to address the debt burden of low-income countries and deliver aid to emerging markets.
Last week G20 leaders said they were injecting $5 trillion into the global economy to head off a feared deep recession.
In the European Union, however, battle lines have been drawn over the terms of a rescue plan.
Worst-hit Italy and Spain are leading a push for a shared debt instrument — dubbed “coronabonds.”
But talk of shared debt is a red line for Germany and other northern countries, threatening to divide the bloc.
Deaths shot up again across Europe. While there are hopeful signs that the spread of infections is slowing in hardest-hit Italy and Spain, which both reported more than 800 new deaths Tuesday.
France recorded a one-day record of 499 dead while Britain reported 381 coronavirus deaths, including that of a previously healthy 13-year-old.
That came after a 12-year-old Belgian girl succumbed to an illness that is serious chiefly for older, frailer people with pre-existing health conditions.
Lockdowns remain at the forefront of official disease-stopping arsenals — a strategy increasingly borne-out by science.
Researchers said China’s decision to shutter Wuhan, ground zero for the global COVID-19 pandemic, may have prevented three-quarters of a million new cases by delaying the spread of the virus.
“Our analysis suggests that without the Wuhan travel ban and the national emergency response there would have been more than 700,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases outside of Wuhan” by mid-February, said Oxford University’s Christopher Dye.