Center to measure Hajj pilgrims’ satisfaction with government services

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Muslim pilgrims touch the golden door of the Kaaba, the cubic building at the Grand Mosque, as they pray ahead of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday, Aug. 17, 2018. (AP)
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Muslim worshippers pray around the Kaaba, Islam's holiest shrine, at the Grand Mosque in Saudi Arabia's holy city of Mecca on August 16, 2018, prior to the start of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city. (AFP)
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Muslim worshippers perform prayers around the Kaaba, Islam's holiest shrine, at the Grand Mosque in Saudi Arabia's holy city of Mecca on August 15, 2018, prior to the start of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city. (AFP)
Updated 17 August 2018

Center to measure Hajj pilgrims’ satisfaction with government services

  • Adaa seeks to measure the performance of public entities and prepare periodic reports on the results of their performance
  • More than 30 services provided by government agencies will be assessed

JEDDAH: The National Center for Performance Measurement (Adaa) has activated one of its beneficiaries’ measurement tools to assess pilgrims’ satisfaction with government services during the Hajj season.
This measurement is in line with the Kingdom’s efforts to serve pilgrims and facilitate pilgrimage performance, and aims to improve services.
It also aims to support the improvement of government services by measuring service quality and beneficiaries’ satisfaction.
Adaa Director General Husameddin Al-Madani said that measuring pilgrims’ satisfaction complies with King Salman’s directives on offering the best experience for the Hajj.
Reports on pilgrims’ satisfaction will give government agencies the tools to enhance the efficiency and quality of services.
Al-Madani said that pilgrims’ satisfaction is centered around four key stages: Obtaining a Hajj visa or permit, the experience of traveling to and from Makkah, support services at the Two Holy Mosques and Hajj holy sites, and the departure experience. More than 30 services provided by government agencies will be assessed.
Al-Madani said that Adaa measurement follows the best international standards and covers five main criteria: Clear procedures, location readiness, speed of service, satisfaction of employees’ performance, and satisfaction with services.
Results will feed into Adaa’s quarterly beneficiaries’ satisfaction reports, which are presented to the Council of Ministers and shared with authorities to enhance public services.
Adaa seeks to measure the performance of public entities and prepare periodic reports on the results of their performance and the results of beneficiaries’ satisfaction of the quality of services provided by public entities.


Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Brilliance of the Souls’ comes to Saudi Arabia’s AlUla

Spheres of multicolored light hang at different heights and intervals from the ceiling, bringing to mind stars, planets and galaxies from afar. (Photo/Huda Bashatah)
Updated 50 min 55 sec ago

Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Brilliance of the Souls’ comes to Saudi Arabia’s AlUla

  • Visitors are instantly immersed in a different, ethereal world once the door closes behind them

ALULA: Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama has made her Saudi Arabian debut with one of her mirrored “infinity rooms” available to visit at AlUla’s Maraya Concert Hall.

The installation at AlUla, titled “Infinity Mirrored Room — Brilliance of the Souls,” is deceptively small at first. A totally reflective space with water surrounding a small platform on the ground for visitors to stand on, observers are instantly immersed in a different, ethereal world once the door closes behind them.
Spheres of multicolored light hang at different heights and intervals from the ceiling, bringing to mind stars, planets and galaxies from afar. The viewer is insulated from the outside world, and the space transforms from a confined room barely big enough for two people to an unending wonder.
The exhibit makes for a perfect place to take an ethereal, otherworldly selfie, as demonstrated by many of its visitors, such as Finnish resident Laura Alho, known online as “blueabaya.” Alho took to Twitter to post photos of her experience, saying she had “never seen anything like it.”
The concert hall itself is also covered in mirrors on the outside, designed with the intention of blending into the surrounding rocky landscape of AlUla without disrupting the natural beauty of the location.
Kusama, a 90-year-old artist from Matsumoto, is widely acknowledged as one of the most important contemporary Japanese creatives. Though she works primarily through sculpture and installation, she also paints, contributes to film and performance art, and dabbles in poetry, fiction, and fashion. She is famous for her conceptual art, which shows attributes of feminism, minimalism, surrealism, art brut, pop art, and abstract expressionism.

HIGHLIGHT

The ‘Infinity Mirrored Room’ is deceptively small at first. It is a totally reflective space with water surrounding a small platform on the ground for visitors to stand on.

At the age of 10, she began to experience vivid hallucinations which consisted of dense fields of dots, which inspired the Infinity Mirrored Rooms that she is most well-known for. As a way of therapy and self-expression, Kusama began creating these spaces with mirrored walls and multiple dots incorporated into the designs.
Kusama’s work is showcased at museums throughout the world, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, and the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo. There are 10 permanent Infinity Mirrored Rooms in museums worldwide, with several temporary showcases leased to various others. People have reportedly lined up for as long as five hours just to be allowed inside one for 30 seconds.
Interested parties can visit the Infinity Mirrored Room as part of the Winter at Tantora festival, taking place in AlUla until March 20. Access to the room is free to concertgoers with a ticket, details of which can be found at experiencealula.com