Indian Muslims protest China’s detention of Uighur Muslims

Indian Muslims shout slogans during a protest against the Chinese government, in Mumbai, India, Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP)
Updated 14 September 2018

Indian Muslims protest China’s detention of Uighur Muslims

  • About 150 Muslims have protested in Mumbai
  • The protesters chanted “Down with China’”

MUMBAI: About 150 Muslims have protested in Mumbai, India’s financial capital, to demand that China stop detaining thousands of minority Uighur Muslims in camps and political indoctrination centers in its Xinjiang region.
The protesters chanted “Down with China’” as they demonstrated outside a mosque after Friday noon prayers.
An organizer, Mohammed Saeed Nori, accused China of detaining many Muslims in camps and “snatching their religious freedom.”
China has tightened restrictions over the instruction of Islam and the Uighur language in an effort to assimilate the minority group into the Chinese mainstream, which is dominated by the Han ethnic group. It says the process will bring economic benefits to Xinjiang’s poor people.
China has denied operating the camps and said it is taking necessary measures to fight terrorism, religious extremism and separatism.


Cambodia to ban elephant rides at Angkor temples

Updated 15 November 2019

Cambodia to ban elephant rides at Angkor temples

  • The Angkor archaeological complex in northern Siem Reap attracts the bulk of the kingdom’s tourists
  • Apsara authority plans to end the elephant rides by 2020
PHNOM PENH: Cambodia will ban all elephant rides at the country’s famed Angkor temple park by early next year, an official said Friday, a rare win for conservationists who have long decried the popular practice as cruel.
The Angkor archaeological complex in northern Siem Reap attracts the bulk of the kingdom’s foreign tourists — which topped six million in 2018 — and many opt for elephants rides around the ancient temples.
But these rides “will end by the start of 2020,” said Long Kosal, a spokesman with the Apsara Authority, which manages the park.
“Using elephants for business is not appropriate anymore,” he told AFP, adding that some of the animals were “already old.”
So far, five of the 14 working elephants have been transferred to a community forest about 40 kilometers (25 miles) away from the temples.
“They will live out their natural lives there,” Kosal said.
The company that owns the elephants will continue to look after them, he added.
Cambodia has long come under fire from animal rights groups for ubiquitous elephant rides on offer for tourists, also seen in neighboring Thailand, Vietnam and Laos.
The elephants are broken in during training and rights groups have accused handlers of overworking them.
In 2016, a female elephant died by the roadside after carrying tourists around the Angkor Wat temple complex in severely hot weather.
The animal had been working for around 45 minutes before she collapsed.