Lebanese newspaper Al-Anwar stops printing

“Dar Al-Sayyad has decided to stop publishing Al-Anwar from next Monday,” the political daily said on its website. (Screenshot of Al-Anwar’s website)
Updated 28 September 2018

Lebanese newspaper Al-Anwar stops printing

  • Al-Anwar is the latest victim of the country’s media crisis.
  • Founded in 1943 by Lebanese writer Said Freiha, Dar Al-Sayyad has offices in London, Dubai, Riyadh, Cairo and Damascus, as well as Beirut.

BEIRUT: Lebanon newspaper Al-Anwar on Friday said its publisher was suspending its print version, as it became the latest victim of the country’s media crisis.
“Dar Al-Sayyad has decided to stop publishing Al-Anwar from next Monday,” the political daily said on its front page.
The newspaper, which was first issued in 1959, said the demise of its print version was due to “financial losses.”
The publisher’s eight other publications — including popular cultural weekly Al-Shabaka — would also cease to be printed, it said.
It was not immediately clear if there were any plans for the publications to continue to have a presence online.
Founded in 1943 by Lebanese writer Said Freiha, Dar Al-Sayyad has offices in London, Dubai, Riyadh, Cairo and Damascus, as well as Beirut.
The press in Lebanon has been in crisis for several years, both as it struggles to adapt to the digital era and faces economic difficulties.
In June, prestigious pan-Arab newspaper Al-Hayat closed its Lebanon offices, where it was first founded in 1946 before later becoming Saudi owned.
Its printing presses in Beirut stopped the same month, leaving its international version only available online.
In late 2016, Lebanese newspaper As-Safir shuttered 42 years after it published its first edition, with the founder saying it had run out of funds.
Other newspapers have carried out mass layoffs or suspended salary payments.


Algeria journalist acquitted after year in detention

Updated 23 September 2020

Algeria journalist acquitted after year in detention

ALGIERS: Algerian journalist Belkacem Djir, sentenced to three years’ jail in a common law case, was acquitted Wednesday and is expected to be released after over a year behind bars, his lawyer said.
“The Algiers court has announced that journalist Belkacem Djir has been acquitted,” Fatiha Rouibi wrote on Facebook.
Djir had been accused of using a “false identity” and “blackmail.”
No other information was available on the case against him, with lawyers refusing to discuss it publicly while acknowledging privately that his case was “sensitive.”
Djir, a 34-year-old journalist for private television channel Echourouk News, was detained in July 2019.
He is one of several Algerian journalists currently in prison.
They include Khaled Drareni, Casbah Tribune news website editor and correspondent for French-language TV5 Monde, and Abdelkrim Zeghileche, head of a web-based radio station.
They are being prosecuted in cases linked to “Hirak,” the anti-regime protest movement that began in February 2019.
Drareni was on September 15 handed a two-year jail sentence for his coverage of the movement that toppled Algeria’s longtime president Abdelaziz Bouteflika last year.
Zeghileche was sentenced in late August to two years in prison for “undermining national unity” and “insulting the head of state.”
A total of 61 people are currently behind bars for acts related to “Hirak,” according to CNLD, a rights group that lists prisoners of conscience in Algeria.