Toyota recalls 70,000 vehicles to replace air bag inflators

Toyota is recalling about 70,000 Toyota and Lexus brand vehicles in North America to replace air bag inflators that could explode and hurl shrapnel at drivers and passengers. (AFP)
Updated 12 December 2018
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Toyota recalls 70,000 vehicles to replace air bag inflators

  • Takata uses the chemical ammonium nitrate to create a small explosion and inflate the bags
  • Can deteriorate and burn too fast, blowing apart a metal canister

DETROIT: Toyota is recalling about 70,000 Toyota and Lexus brand vehicles in North America to replace air bag inflators that could explode and hurl shrapnel at drivers and passengers.
The recall covers the 2003 to 2005 Corolla, the 2002 to 2005 Sequoia, the 2003 to 2005 Tundra and the 2002 to 2005 Lexus SC.
Takata uses the chemical ammonium nitrate to create a small explosion and inflate the bags. But it can deteriorate and burn too fast, blowing apart a metal canister.
The Toyota and Lexus vehicles were recalled previously and the inflators replaced with new ones that still used ammonium nitrate. In the latest recall, Toyota will use inflators made by another company with a safer chemical.
Owners will be notified early next year. Toyota says it has replacement parts available.
About 65,000 of the recalled vehicles are in the US
Toyota says it’s doing the recall a year ahead of a schedule set by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
At least 23 people have died worldwide due to the problem caused by inflators made by Takata Corp., resulting in the largest series of auto recalls in US history. They cover 37 million vehicles and about 50 million inflators in the US About 100 million inflators are being recalled worldwide.
The recalls forced Takata of Japan to seek bankruptcy protection.


Oil prices climb as Saudi capacity cushions impact

Updated 20 September 2019

Oil prices climb as Saudi capacity cushions impact

  • Kingdom pledges return to capacity by end of November as Kuwait strengthens security for oil sector

LONDON: Oil prices gained on Thursday, supported by supply risks as the market assesses the fallout from last weekend’s drone attacks on Saudi oil
infrastructure.

Brent crude futures gained $1.78 to $63.80 a barrel, while US West Texas Intermediate crude was up $1.28 at $58.40 a barrel.

The attacks knocked out around half of Saudi Arabia’s crude production and severely limited the country’s spare capacity, a cushion for oil markets in any unplanned outage.

“Global available spare capacity is extremely low at present following the weekend attacks, leaving little room for additional outages, which tends to be price supportive,” UBS oil analyst Giovanni Staunovo said.

Earlier this week Saudi Arabia set out a timeline for a resumption of full operations, saying it had restored supplies to customers at levels prior to the attacks by drawing from its oil inventories.

HIGHLIGHTS

• US to impose more sanctions on Iran.

• Cushing stocks at lowest since October, 2018.

• Global excess capacity at low level.

The Kingdom said it would restore its lost production by the end of this month, and bring its output capacity back to 12 million barrels per day by the end of November.

“These plans suggest Saudi Arabia will have no spare capacity for at least the next two and a half months,” consultancy Energy Aspects said.

Saudi Arabia, the world’s leading oil exporter, has said the crippling attack on its oil sites was “unquestionably sponsored” by Iran.

US President Donald Trump said there were many options short of war with Iran and added that he had ordered the US Treasury to “substantially increase sanctions” on Tehran. Iran has denied involvement in the strikes.

Iran warned President Trump against being dragged into all-out war in the Middle East.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has described the weekend strike as an act of war and has been discussing possible retaliation with Saudi Arabia and other Gulf allies.

Kuwait’s oil sector has raised its security to the highest level as a precaution, a Kuwaiti official said.

Separately, weekly data from the Energy Information Administration on US oil inventories provided a mixed snapshot.

Stockpiles of crude in the US the world’s largest oil producer, rose by 1.1 million barrels last week against analysts’ expectations for a drop of 2.5 million barrels.

However, stocks at Cushing, Oklahoma, the delivery point for benchmark futures, fell to their lowest since October 2018.